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Progression [from beginner to expert, in MN]

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 

Hello, 

 

I was lucky enough to have a friend drag me and my lady along for a chilly first time out skiing last year on New Years Eve. The weather that night was -18F wearing a jacket that they let me use XXL (I wear a medium) you would think anyone would have had a awful time. Crazy as we are we fell 100% in love with skiing. Skied i think a total of 6 times last year and made the decision that this is now going to be our life.

 

So here we are in the 14/15 season bought all our gear and even though opening day here was last Friday the only day we have taken off has been Monday. What we have decided is we will ski 6 days a week with Mondays being off days. Sundays we will be in a group ski school and Wednesdays we will take private lessons (not together).

 

Now my question is with this much dedication and mileage planned what should my expectations be as for progression? Our first private of the year we took on Sunday coming in with the little we learned last year, I am now skiing parallel and the instructor had me doing edging drills and balance drills after first watching me ski. I just don't know where i should be setting the bar should I be expecting to hit expert by the end of the year or is that to aggressive? I just need some real expectations from your experiences.

 

Thanks in advance for the advice and knowledge!

post #2 of 40

Welcome to our wonderful sport and to epic.  There is no way to answer your question except to say that I doubt you'll be an expert in your first season even if you ski 100 days or more!  But who knows?  Expert is a high bar to set.  Short of that it's impossible for anyone to predict the future.  Every student and every person is different.

 

That said you'll probably get pretty damn good at it.

 

Good luck and have fun!

post #3 of 40

I would expect to end up at what you consider expert right now.

 

Only problem with that is that by the time you get there, the level that you consider expert will be much higher.

 

Best of luck!

post #4 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddyJbird View Post
 

Hello, 

 

I was lucky enough to have a friend drag me and my lady along for a chilly first time out skiing last year on New Years Eve. The weather that night was -18F wearing a jacket that they let me use XXL (I wear a medium) you would think anyone would have had a awful time. Crazy as we are we fell 100% in love with skiing. Skied i think a total of 6 times last year and made the decision that this is now going to be our life.

 

So here we are in the 14/15 season bought all our gear and even though opening day here was last Friday the only day we have taken off has been Monday. What we have decided is we will ski 6 days a week with Mondays being off days. Sundays we will be in a group ski school and Wednesdays we will take private lessons (not together).

 

Now my question is with this much dedication and mileage planned what should my expectations be as for progression? Our first private of the year we took on Sunday coming in with the little we learned last year, I am now skiing parallel and the instructor had me doing edging drills and balance drills after first watching me ski. I just don't know where i should be setting the bar should I be expecting to hit expert by the end of the year or is that to aggressive? I just need some real expectations from your experiences.

 

Thanks in advance for the advice and knowledge!


Welcome to EpicSki! and the skiing world!  It's great fun, isn't it?  Might help to know what region you are skiing in.  How much vertical and skiable acreage is there at your home mountain?

post #5 of 40
Welcome to epic!

Two things come to mind. One is that you might want to consider joining a seasonal program if they have one in your area. This way you'll have the same coach for the season. Where I work they have adult clinics that run for 5 weeks. Something where you get the same coach for each session. It is usually less expensive too.

Another way to look at this isn't whether or not you achieve a certain level, but how much you progress. Focus on the day instead of the goal. If you search here at epic, you'll find that the definition for expert is rather elusive and might include things you don't care about (racing, terrain park etc). You'll eventually come up with what you believe it means to you.

Enjoy the journey. The destination might end up being anti climatic but you'll have a blast along the way. I know I am biggrin.gif

Ken
post #6 of 40

Wow, skiing six days a week?  That will enable you to progress quite quickly just from all the mileage you'll be getting on skis.

 

Where are you based out of?

 

As you'll be taking regular private lessons, I'd recommend booking with the same instructor over and over again, assuming you "click" with your instructor of course.  Different instructors communicate the same thing in different ways and being asked to do the same thing in different ways can be very confusing.

 

If you search the archives of this forum, you'll see that there have been some endless discussions on what constitutes an "expert" skier.  One of the great things about skiing is that there's always something more to learn.

 

Keep us posted on how you're progressing.

post #7 of 40

EddyJ, welcome to the community.

Like L&A said, enjoy the journey. 

Instructors have three basic rules for students; Safety, Fun and Learning.

I've been skiing for over 35 years and it's still fun.

After 35 years, am I an expert, I don't know but I'm still learning. Last year I got my PSIA level 1 certification at the age of 66. Tonight is the first meeting of my Level 2 training group, I can't wait.

Skiing is a lifetime sport. I intend to be skiing with my kids when I'm 80.

 

Enjoy the journey and never stop learning.

post #8 of 40

Wow, you've fallen hard!  Bravo.  Time and mileage will get you far.   And it sounds like you are very determined to excel.  That attitude will produce results.  Not everyone is as dedicated to becoming an expert as you are.  Private lessons once a week are the best of all worlds for that.  In a seasonal group you might end up getting little or no personal feedback.  The personal feedback provided in a private will help you improve faster than skiing around in a group with some pointers and drills offered every now and then.  But the group can provide social contacts and fun without all the constant pressure of working on new movement patterns.  Can you do both?  Oh wait, I see you are doing that.  Perfect.  

 

I second the idea to set up those weekly privates with the same coach all season.  But the best coach for you might not be the first person you work with.  Do due diligence at the ski school desk when you make those appointments.  Ask for seasoned instructors with lots of return clients, and if you can, ski with different recommended coaches from week to week at first (the best coaches may be booked up though).  Once you find the best person for you, set up appointments for the rest of the season.  

 

One season with 60 days on snow isn't going to make you an expert at all kinds of skiing.  You'll have days where you'll have big breakthroughs that will make your heart pound.  You'll "get down" all kinds of terrain that today you can't, and by the end of the season you'll actually ski some of that terrain with confidence and grace.  You may also have days when you wonder why you ever thought you were improving.  Snow changes; what worked for you yesterday may not work today.  Someone said the expert you want to be right now is probably within your reach for this season, but once you get to that point you'll have another kind of expert in mind for next season.  Yep, that's how it goes, even after years of skiing, for those who get their kicks from challenges.

 

There are lots of us who would love to read about your progress this season.  Where are you skiing?   What kinds of terrain does your mountain offer?

post #9 of 40
The one thing to be wary about when setting expectations is the disappointment factor should you set your goals unreachably high. Focus more on just enjoying each increase in ability. Let me add that I started going downhill on skis in 1948 and have skied 130+ days nearly every year since 1970.. I gain something in my ski performance almost every season.
post #10 of 40

Welcome to Epic!

 

What I would like to offer up is a learning philosophy on how you can best progress.

 

You will find a plethora of opinions and advice in this forum from many excellent coaches, teachers and long time recreational skiers.  Because we are only human and there is only so much one can write, much of the valuable advice and opinions are predicated on assumptions and in contexts that you, depending on your experience and knowledge, may be unaware of often making it difficult to understand and implement.

 

So here is my bare bones approach to learning sports: There are two physical components to sport.  Skills and technique.  You DEVELOP skills and you APPLY technique. Skill level enables the application of technique. 

 

Let me embellish..

 

So as not to assume, what follows is in the general context (but not exclusively) of medium radius carved turns.

 

The PSIA skill set is comprised of Rotary skills, Pressure Management skills and Edge Management skills. These three skills are integrally developed within the skill of Dynamic Balance (balance while on the move and in the case of skiing, while the surface is constantly changing).  

 

I read you have worked on balance drills... I have found that the more tasks you accomplish to develop dynamic balance, the more success you will have with the other skills. The bigger you make your "envelope" of dynamic balance the more you will be able to control your movements and apply technique.

 

One of the ultimate tasks is to be able to make linked medium radius turns on one ski both inside and out. Moving through a turn transition on one ski really challenges your entire skills set because: 1. you are moving your Center of Mass (CoM) between a gravitational force environment to one progressively influenced by circular (centripetal/centrifugal) forces brought on by the edging/bending of the ski. 2. you are changing edges and  3. You are acutely dealing with the release and application of pressure. But I digress. 

 

Getting to higher levels requires dedication to skill building tasks and lots of practice. And as always, do this with an eye on safety first.

 

Good Luck and enjoy the ride!

post #11 of 40
Thread Starter 

First off wow! Thank you for all the replies!

 

Currently I am based out of SE Minnesota and our hill is Afton Alps it's nothing like East or West. But I have also heard if you can ski the junk in the Midwest you can ski any where. I think it's roughly close to 300 acres 50 trails and 18 lifts and 350ft vertical (best info I can find) the best part is it is now owned by Vail so our passes are good for any Vail resort. Already have a week long trip planned for 3rd week in February to Breckenridge of course we will hit up the other Vail resorts during that week as well. Having said that i'm a pretty last minute guy and so is my lovely lady so i'm sure we will be on a few road trips both out west and east. I do have a brother in CT so that give me an excuse for east and army buddies i served with stationed in Fort Carson, so east and west covered check!

 

As for instructors Sunday when we took our private we ended up with a young 17yo level 2 instructor being that it was our first of the season we took it together. Luckily being that it's very early and only a few runs open etc... instructors were out and about I would assume just enjoying being out skiing again. A female Instructor rolled up while we were doing our lesson and joined in she decided to take my lady off with her and teach her seeing that we were at different levels they both agreed it would be best. My lady immediately clicked with her and in 5 min's she had her calmed down and doing perfectly shaped S turns down the blue run. My instructor was so impressed by what he saw he immediately said "Holy crap do you see that? Lets follow them down!"

 

I loved the fact that after we separated my instructor got me right away and could see i was a sponge to soak up what ever he tossed at me, I felt like he was going to challenge me and help me to progress as fast as I could nail it. I could see right away she was comfortable with hers as well and knew at that moment these would be the people we would be sticking with. After we got down the hill the last time we chatted for quite some time probably 15-20 and after that it was carved in stone yep these are the 2 people that will help us along our journey!

 

Now I know as for what is considered expert could be a never ending journey for a life long skier constantly progressing always having something to tackle. But for what I consider expert and a successful season from Beginer to Expert would be:

 

Being able to handle all terrain on my hill (minus terrain park to old to get body slammed onto a pipe)

Being able to handle most all terrain out West (again minus terrain park and no cliff jumping)

Races possibly.

And hitting level 9 on Vails epicMIX 1-9 scale

 

Long term goals are:

 

PSIA certified 

Part-Time Instructor (Lady is a NP so possibly ski patrol for her)

Weekend Racer 

Powder Chaser 

 

 

As for updates I will post some on here as well as starting a blog. I came across a article about a guy that started a journey from never golfing to professional golfer and found his blog it was quite amazing and inspiring. So I think for this epic journey of hard work and dedication I to will be starting a blog to hopefully inspire someone else that it all pays off if you put your mind to it. Knowing what I know now and had I not grown up poor I would chosen to dedicate my work life to Skiing instead of a career in the IT industry.

post #12 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddyJbird View Post
 

First off wow! Thank you for all the replies!

 

Currently I am based out of SE Minnesota and our hill is Afton Alps it's nothing like East or West. But I have also heard if you can ski the junk in the Midwest you can ski any where. I think it's roughly close to 300 acres 50 trails and 18 lifts and 350ft vertical (best info I can find) the best part is it is now owned by Vail so our passes are good for any Vail resort. Already have a week long trip planned for 3rd week in February to Breckenridge of course we will hit up the other Vail resorts during that week as well. Having said that i'm a pretty last minute guy and so is my lovely lady so i'm sure we will be on a few road trips both out west and east. I do have a brother in CT so that give me an excuse for east and army buddies i served with stationed in Fort Carson, so east and west covered check!

 

[snip]

 

As for updates I will post some on here as well as starting a blog. I came across a article about a guy that started a journey from never golfing to professional golfer and found his blog it was quite amazing and inspiring. So I think for this epic journey of hard work and dedication I to will be starting a blog to hopefully inspire someone else that it all pays off if you put your mind to it. Knowing what I know now and had I not grown up poor I would chosen to dedicate my work life to Skiing instead of a career in the IT industry.

I would love to follow your journey via a blog!

 

I'm an older skier but not an instructor, so will wait and see what they have to say.  One thing I do know is that it's quite possible to learn a great deal at a small hill.  My home mountain is in northern VA.  What I've learned working with my Level 3 coach the last few seasons has made a big difference when I head out west.  Only became an advanced skier in the last decade.

post #13 of 40
Quote:

Originally Posted by EddyJbird View Post

 

Now I know as for what is considered expert could be a never ending journey for a life long skier constantly progressing always having something to tackle. But for what I consider expert and a successful season from Beginer to Expert would be:

 

Being able to handle all terrain on my hill (minus terrain park to old to get body slammed onto a pipe)

Being able to handle most all terrain out West (again minus terrain park and no cliff jumping)

Races possibly.

And hitting level 9 on Vails epicMIX 1-9 scale

 

I applaud the goal-setting, but I have to say that you are aiming awfully high with some of these goals.

  • The "Level 1..9" thing is simply a way to organize ski school classes.  Very few people continue to take lessons after the "low intermediate" stage, so once you reach the "Level 6, 7" range (i.e., solid intermediate) -- well, you're probably going to be in a "group lesson" that consists of only you and your wife.  Basically, don't put too much stock into what your "level" is...  as you progress higher on the scale, you become very aware of what areas need improvement and group lessons become less and less useful, at which point your "level" is simply a number.
  • As for racing, there are no particular "skill" requirements for "open to the public" races.  The most common is NASTAR which is hosted by many races.  I've seen kids snowplowing through the course, so it doesn't require any sort of particularly advanced ski technique.  Jumping into a race course is a fun experience and a great learning tool even if your time isn't particularly fast.  Some people get smitten by the race bug; a whole segment of the sport is devoted to finding ways to go a little faster.
  • You will find that "most all terrain" out West is a wildly different animal than "most all terrain" in the midWest.  Just saying.  ;)
post #14 of 40

I will echo what Kevin said above, and I will add:

 

when you reach the intermediate stage (and you will, very soon)  it is very easy to become discouraged at the slower rate of apparent progress, especially if you take a week or more break and muscle memory starts to fade.     It is also very easy at that stage to become lost, confused among skillsets and to lose your place in the progress book, if you will permit the metaphor.     External frameworks can help a lot with this.   In your case, I reckon the sooner you start training for instructor the better.  

post #15 of 40

Welcome to Epic Eddy!

 

Lofty goals are fine. Lofty expectations are trouble. Everyone learns at their own pace. In general, the better you get the harder it is to improve but people often make breakthroughs that can bump their progress in spurts. As stated above the definition of "expert" is variable. The current PSIA skill level breakdown is beginner, intermediate and advanced. Getting to the Advanced Zone is certainly doable in a 60 day season for an average skier, but you're probably going to be a bit limited in "all terrain" experience and "all conditions" experience and you'll be especially limited in combinations of all terrain and conditions (e.g. Vail type mogul runs that are completely [cough] firm on a spring morning before the sun softens the snow into corn). I would expect that you might want to opt to leave serious tree skiing until next season.

 

At my little bump hill in south central PA I once had a pre teen girl who was on her 10th day of her first season. She had taken one 90 minute lesson per week. Our lesson was on the expert terrain and she was doing fine. At the end of the lesson she was ready for most of Vail's mapped terrain. Her rate of learning was "average". Little people tend to learn faster, but a 60 day season at Afton Alps with regular lessons ought to easily get you to the ability to handle all of their terrain. This experience should also get you the fundamentals that will greatly assist adapting to steeper terrain and different snow conditions at places like Vail, but the knowledge of what small adjustments need to be made and the ability to make them will probably take more effort and luck (e.g. a 3 foot powder day) than this season will provide. I've seen people with many years of experience very happy to limit themselves to easy blue terrain at places like Vail. My dad skied for over 50 seasons. He could probably count the number of black runs skied in his career on 2 hands and never learned how to ski in more than 4" of powder.

 

I always try to set "stretch" goals but exceed my expectations. Look through the old threads here on Epic You should find some gems to help you on your journey.

post #16 of 40

Welcome Eddy!  

 

I ski Afton most every weekday, you can find me on the hill in the orange jacket and blue pants, I would like to ski with you.  

 

I'm planning on taking some lessons when I'm out west, as I agree, it's difficult to become an "expert" in all terrain types here on the molehills of MN.  MN is a great place to learn the fundamentals, and become an expert carver, we have the icy hills and repetition for it.  I will say the "black" runs here are nothing like what you'd see in CO, UT, or virtually any real mountain.  The biggest issue I've noticed preventing a midwest skier from becoming a legitimate "expert" is the fear factor.  We aren't exposed to any really scary runs here, and when at a legitimate mountain, many skiers shy away from the challenging terrain needed to improve to that next level.

post #17 of 40

Hi Eddy

 

 I started teaching at Afton in '81, and have been teaching at Sugarbush since '96 so I certainly think it is possible to become an expert skier at Afton. The biggest thing is spending time on skis, and getting good feedback. While I was still working there there were  a couple of weeknight or weekend series classes where you stayed with the same group, same instructor for the season and is great fun. Afton's school was big enough that at that time all the upper level series classes were taught by L3s, mostly by examiners.

 

As too teaching. I met my wife when she came to Afton to start teaching the third season she skied. People skills and willingness to learn are way more important then skiing skills for new hires. I started skiing as a 10 year old and took classes and a little racing but it wasn't until I started to teach that I really learned to ski. There is nothing like trying to explain things to someone else to really learn it yourself. If you are looking to really learn to ski, teaching is a great way to do it. Afton has traditionally had a very strong school and gives a solid grounding in the basics of skiing and teaching.

 

From where you are Welch village is a bit closer to you, and (20 years ago, man I'm getting old) had a school with a very good reputation for turning out solid skiers/instructors.

 

Afton had a busier more Western feel, Welch a more laid back eastern vibe, but as of the last time I skied both areas Afton had a greater Quantity of snow and Fantastic lighting for night skiing, Welch usually had better quality of snow, and a couple steeper runs but the lighting was not great.  

post #18 of 40

Welch is doing some great things with their ski school these days. I would highly recommend lessons there.

post #19 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by EddyJbird View Post
 

First off wow! Thank you for all the replies!

 

Currently I am based out of SE Minnesota and our hill is Afton Alps it's nothing like East or West. But I have also heard if you can ski the junk in the Midwest you can ski any where. I think it's roughly close to 300 acres 50 trails and 18 lifts and 350ft vertical (best info I can find) the best part is it is now owned by Vail so our passes are good for any Vail resort. Already have a week long trip planned for 3rd week in February to Breckenridge of course we will hit up the other Vail resorts during that week as well. Having said that i'm a pretty last minute guy and so is my lovely lady so i'm sure we will be on a few road trips both out west and east. I do have a brother in CT so that give me an excuse for east and army buddies i served with stationed in Fort Carson, so east and west covered check!

 

As for instructors Sunday when we took our private we ended up with a young 17yo level 2 instructor being that it was our first of the season we took it together. Luckily being that it's very early and only a few runs open etc... instructors were out and about I would assume just enjoying being out skiing again. A female Instructor rolled up while we were doing our lesson and joined in she decided to take my lady off with her and teach her seeing that we were at different levels they both agreed it would be best. My lady immediately clicked with her and in 5 min's she had her calmed down and doing perfectly shaped S turns down the blue run. My instructor was so impressed by what he saw he immediately said "Holy crap do you see that? Lets follow them down!"

 

I loved the fact that after we separated my instructor got me right away and could see i was a sponge to soak up what ever he tossed at me, I felt like he was going to challenge me and help me to progress as fast as I could nail it. I could see right away she was comfortable with hers as well and knew at that moment these would be the people we would be sticking with. After we got down the hill the last time we chatted for quite some time probably 15-20 and after that it was carved in stone yep these are the 2 people that will help us along our journey!

 

Now I know as for what is considered expert could be a never ending journey for a life long skier constantly progressing always having something to tackle. But for what I consider expert and a successful season from Beginer to Expert would be:

 

Being able to handle all terrain on my hill (minus terrain park to old to get body slammed onto a pipe)

Being able to handle most all terrain out West (again minus terrain park and no cliff jumping)

Races possibly.

And hitting level 9 on Vails epicMIX 1-9 scale

 

Long term goals are:

 

PSIA certified 

Part-Time Instructor (Lady is a NP so possibly ski patrol for her)

Weekend Racer 

Powder Chaser 

 

 

As for updates I will post some on here as well as starting a blog. I came across a article about a guy that started a journey from never golfing to professional golfer and found his blog it was quite amazing and inspiring. So I think for this epic journey of hard work and dedication I to will be starting a blog to hopefully inspire someone else that it all pays off if you put your mind to it. Knowing what I know now and had I not grown up poor I would chosen to dedicate my work life to Skiing instead of a career in the IT industry.

 

Most of those goals are pretty good for where you're at. Just don't be afraid to change them as you get more into the sport. As mentioned, you're going to quickly find yourself putting less and less value on a lesson level number. A piece of advice, move the "skiing most terrain out west" from the "this year" category to the "long term" category. The terrain and snow out west are vastly different than what you will be skiing in Minnesota, and you will not have enough time on that terrain this year to be able to comfortably ski a fraction of it. Once you get out west, you'll also realize that "most terrain" includes a whole ton of stuff that isn't on the trail map. Tree skiing is a big thing, and is not easy by any stretch of the imagination. 

 

Also, I would do a little further inquiry about the certifications of your instructors. Gaining your Level 2 is not a very easy feat, and usually takes a number of years to accomplish. I'm not sure about Central division, but in the Eastern division of PSIA, it is literally impossible for a 17 year old to have a Level 2. Somebody can join at 16, and then needs a minimum of 2 years of PSIA membership and teaching before being eligible to take a Level 2 exam. Even if that isn't the case out there, it is a very rare thing to find a 17 year old who has the teaching ability to pass Level 2 muster. 

 

Very glad to see such enthusiasm, and don't forget to have fun out there!

post #20 of 40

freeski919, half the fun of going out west from the midwest for the first time is finding out how big and long the runs are. I agree that after a year at Afton EddyJ won't be able to ski most of the terrain at Vail but he'll have the skills to get down a lot of it. And should he get 6" of fresh in China Bowl one morning he'll know nirvana, maybe won't ski it pretty but he'll sure enjoy it.

 

As for the Afton Ski School, they've been pretty well respected for some time. The new SSD is from Canada with an extensive racing background and the equivalent of a USSA Level 500.

Many instructors and supervisors have worked out west when they were younger and several of the older instructors go out west and instruct the last month of the season. Vail even has a program to get Afton instructors to fill in out west when the Afton season ends so they can extend their season well into April. 

As far as EddyJ's instructor goes, he is indeed 17, is a level 2 and super enthusiastic . There were only 37 people who passed Level 2 in Central Div last year and he was one of them.

The female instructor that 'rolled up' and took over with EddyJ's wife is a Ski School supervisor who is almost a Level 3. She has been trying to take the L3 exam the past two years and got hurt in February both years. So, the EddyJ family is in really good hands. And I'll bet there will be a little friendly competition between the two instructors to see which student has the most fun when their students go out west.

 

Heluva, I'm not sure if you know that Welch changed over to PMTS two years ago so doing a lesson there would add a different dimension.

post #21 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCC55125 View Post
 

freeski919, half the fun of going out west from the midwest for the first time is finding out how big and long the runs are. I agree that after a year at Afton EddyJ won't be able to ski most of the terrain at Vail but he'll have the skills to get down a lot of it. And should he get 6" of fresh in China Bowl one morning he'll know nirvana, maybe won't ski it pretty but he'll sure enjoy it.

 

As for the Afton Ski School, they've been pretty well respected for some time. The new SSD is from Canada with an extensive racing background and the equivalent of a USSA Level 500.

Many instructors and supervisors have worked out west when they were younger and several of the older instructors go out west and instruct the last month of the season. Vail even has a program to get Afton instructors to fill in out west when the Afton season ends so they can extend their season well into April. 

As far as EddyJ's instructor goes, he is indeed 17, is a level 2 and super enthusiastic . There were only 37 people who passed Level 2 in Central Div last year and he was one of them.

The female instructor that 'rolled up' and took over with EddyJ's wife is a Ski School supervisor who is almost a Level 3. She has been trying to take the L3 exam the past two years and got hurt in February both years. So, the EddyJ family is in really good hands. And I'll bet there will be a little friendly competition between the two instructors to see which student has the most fun when their students go out west.

 

Heluva, I'm not sure if you know that Welch changed over to PMTS two years ago so doing a lesson there would add a different dimension.

:hijack: Curious, what are the prerequisites for L2 and L3 cert in Central Div? 

post #22 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCC55125 View Post

Heluva, I'm not sure if you know that Welch changed over to PMTS two years ago so doing a lesson there would add a different dimension.

Yes. Very much aware.
post #23 of 40
First off,

EddyJBird, I'm glad you enjoyed your first lesson, and I look forward to working with you in the future. I know the other instructor is equally excited to be working with your lady as well!

I'd like to offer further insight to freeski919, being the 17 year old level II certified PSIA instructor. Central division has similar requirements as other divisions to obtain level II. Typically, you must be 18 and have a long experience of teaching to pass. Luckily, I received excellent opportunities along the road, and was at Afton enough to large amounts of teaching experience. Our local ed staff member did a mock exam, and helped me find a way through the biased guidelines where age somehow dictates how well you can teach and ski. I went to the March exam earlier this year (2014) and passed all three days in both categories. All of my examiners were also level 3 examiners, including Jennifer Simpson, a member of the Alpine team.

I am actively training for level 3 with the other instructor, and I can certainly assure you we are indeed racing to see who can get their student to progress to a higher ability level quickest.
post #24 of 40
Thread Starter 

Update time, 

 

Took about a week off for family visit down south, we wanted to hit up a hill while down there however time didn't really allow for anything but family time. Tonight will be the first night back on ski's since the short break but I'm sure after a few minutes I'll be back into shape. Tonight and throughout the week we will most definitely be venturing out to new terrain as there is more open now as opposed to opener week. Our last day out prior to our vacation I did try out a different blue run than what we have been running down and didn't have any issues. The lady is a little timid her biggest enemy is herself she don't really have the confidence at the moment. Think I'll start feeding her raw steaks and motor oil to get her to start feeling more aggressive. 

 

One major thing i did try last time out though was really pushing the ski on edge. Wow what a difference in turning it felt like i was literally on rails instead of shaving the snow. I will definitely be working more on that tonight I'm hoping for clear slopes not much traffic. Also I'd like to shorten up my turn radius think I'll check out some info before i leave work so i can work on that as well.

 

 

Oh yes and if anyone knows a good way to repair pants please let me know. The lady ripped hers down the back leg about 1.5 inches. (they lasted 4 days)

 

Again thanks for all the info and responses! 

post #25 of 40

The usual:  use duct tape to repair ripped ski pants.

post #26 of 40
You should look onto the sports acabemy program (for grown ups) offered at afton. I have done it several years now and its good time, instructors are great. Highly recommed it. It starts up in a couple of weeks and they have a boys class and a girls class. If you have kids, the kids sessions run at the same time whoch give the opportunity for both adults and kids to take group lessons. Enjoy.
post #27 of 40
Thread Starter 

That's what we plan on doing for Sundays starting this weekend, even though it's supposed to be super warm but session 3 would run into our trip to Breckenridge in Feb so we have to do session 1. It should be quite fun to meet some others out on the slopes that we may otherwise not get the chance to. We also have the ladys little one skiing now as well and he will be doing Sundays as well in the kids session.

post #28 of 40
Thread Starter 

I recently figured out my skis are way to short I have been skiing on Rossignol Experience 83's in a 168, I'm 6'1 and 175lbs. So I have been on the hunt for some good skis that I will not out grow and narrowed it down to some Kastle MX78 in a 176. I knew when I bought Rossi's they were short but they were at a ski swap cheap new un-mounted that I could learn on them and then pass them onto the lady. She's on a 160 which we also knew were short but good for learning so hopefully next week we will be bumping up in length! 

 

Now the mission is what do I slap on these Kastle's for bindings? I have seen threads about a KTI roller plate system with marker 12 bindings or do i go without a plate system? Just don't want to have to remount anytime soon here. Open to suggestions from you as a community. 

 

One other question as well before my ski update, Should i look into a boot alignment for me and the lady? Can't help but think just off the shelf boots with no adjustment we are in perfect alignment.

 

Now for the Update:

 

I am proud to announce progression is coming along nicely since i was told to tip forward into the turns I have found it much easier to initiate a turn. And for short turns I was trying them out over the weekend really was not to hard just have to keep moving. So pumped for this one as well ventured out into practically all the blues now find them very easy to get down. Having said that I think I'm seeing some black in my future early next week if not this weekend!

 

 

Edit: Shout out to Dawgcatching.com for putting those Kastle's aside for me until tomorrow :D


Edited by EddyJbird - 12/11/14 at 10:46am
post #29 of 40

I might be in the minority here, but I find binding plates to make "not a whole lot" of a difference in most skiing applications.  Physics says that plated skis are a bit easier to get on edge, but I'm not usually concerned with whether it took 0.01 seconds or 0.02.

 

Quote:
Should i look into a boot alignment for me and the lady? Can't help but think just off the shelf boots with no adjustment we are in perfect alignment.

 

There are a very few lucky people in the world who were blessed with perfectly straight symmetrical legs.  Statistically speaking, you're not one of them.  Virtually everybody who didn't hit the genetic lottery will ski better with alignment work done to their boots.

post #30 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSIASkier View Post

First off,

EddyJBird, I'm glad you enjoyed your first lesson, and I look forward to working with you in the future. I know the other instructor is equally excited to be working with your lady as well!

I'd like to offer further insight to freeski919, being the 17 year old level II certified PSIA instructor. Central division has similar requirements as other divisions to obtain level II. Typically, you must be 18 and have a long experience of teaching to pass. Luckily, I received excellent opportunities along the road, and was at Afton enough to large amounts of teaching experience. Our local ed staff member did a mock exam, and helped me find a way through the biased guidelines where age somehow dictates how well you can teach and ski. I went to the March exam earlier this year (2014) and passed all three days in both categories. All of my examiners were also level 3 examiners, including Jennifer Simpson, a member of the Alpine team.

I am actively training for level 3 with the other instructor, and I can certainly assure you we are indeed racing to see who can get their student to progress to a higher ability level quickest.

 

EJB you have a fantastic ski coach in PSIASkier.  I spent three days with him in March taking that LVII exam (with different results, regrettably) and from the first morning our group could tell he was beyond LVII standards (in terms of skiing, and soon to learn in coaching/teaching).  I've met very few instructors that were as passionate about skiing and ski instruction as he is.  Add in his ability to assess and provide straightforward feedback and EJB, Afton and PSIA are lucky to have him.  I wish you wish you both many fun and challenging seasons for years to come.

 

Do Well,

Mike

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