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Winter Tire Sales Are Losing Traction - Page 3

post #61 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post
 

1:  I got Nokian WRG2 All Season tires - these are the absolute best AS tires on the market for snow/slush/ice in my opinion.  They are AS tires that perform better in snow than most snow tires out there.  I used snow tires 1 winter, Blizzaks, and the Nokian WRG2 is just as good in snow, and better on hard packed snow and ice than the Blizzaks. The WRG2 is designed to bridge the gap between AS and snow tires. 

 

2. Storing 4 tires is a pain in the ass, takes up too much room in the garage.


^^^^^^  YES!!!  The WR was great and the WR G2 has been great too. We've had several sets of both and have the WR G2 currently on our small AWD/4WD SUV. There's a WR G3 out now too, so I imagine the WR G2 is pretty well phased out at this point, and there is no choice but the WR G3. I am told though that the WR G3 is even better, but they went back to directional (WR was directional, but the WR G2 wasn't). The WR G3 no longer comes big enough for our big AWD/4WD SUV but the Nokian Rotiva AT is their bigger winter rated year-round tire and that worked out well for us last winter and so far this winter. With two SUVs having 8 winter tire/wheels to store is way too much trouble when these year-round winter rated tires work so well. BTW, with both of our SUVs when the TPMS light is on then both vehicles' computers will not let you disable (turn off) the Traction Control / Vehicle Stability Control-Assist. 

post #62 of 470

In Europe, the WR and WR G2 are still available, as the W+ and All Weather+ respectively.

 

http://www.nokiantyres.com/winter-tyres/nokian-w/

 

http://www.nokiantyres.com/winter-tyres/nokian-all-weather-/

post #63 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

When we moved from 40 degree weather to 15 degree weather this happened today as we climbed the ski mountain.  

 

 

 

I checked them in the lot.  They were all at about 27#s.  Added a little air on the way home.  But it is usually helpful to know when they are a little low, but not enough to notice by eyeballing them.  FWIW I had checked them about 3 weeks ago but it was much warmer then.


cold temps = lesser volume = less pressure be careful of inflating in the cold if you don't actually live there, they might be over inflated by the time you get home ;)

post #64 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 


cold temps = lesser volume = less pressure be careful of inflating in the cold if you don't actually live there, they might be over inflated by the time you get home ;)

I had that same thought..  I waited until I got back down beyond the foothills before checking them again and adding air.  Temps were warmer then and there.  The light was still on by the way.  Here's another thought that crossed my mind.  Why wouldn't the pressure in the tires INCREASE when going up a mile in elevation the same way our potato chip bags get all FAT when we bring our lunch up there?:dunno  I really thought that even with the temp drop the elevation change would have offset that.  Anyway, it's all good now.

post #65 of 470
Thread Starter 

I got the Blizzack WS60's last year and ti was the fasted wearing snows I had, I would have been lucky to get 2 seasons out of them, let alone like my General's being able to get 2 plus selling them for $100 after. Discount Tire swapped me out of them and upgraded me to a new tires for $200, mounted and balanced so back to the Generals for me. As far as the TPMS light, it doesn't bother me at all. 

post #66 of 470

I'd rather check my tire pressure a few extra times than drive a tire till the sidewall touches the road, which I've done once before when I didn't get the sensor reset. Expensive lesson. I probably "should" be able to tell when a tire is going flat just by road feel, but sometimes I'm just not focused on how the car is driving.

post #67 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 


cold temps = lesser volume = less pressure be careful of inflating in the cold if you don't actually live there, they might be over inflated by the time you get home ;)

I had that same thought..  I waited until I got back down beyond the foothills before checking them again and adding air.  Temps were warmer then and there.  The light was still on by the way.  Here's another thought that crossed my mind.  Why wouldn't the pressure in the tires INCREASE when going up a mile in elevation the same way our potato chip bags get all FAT when we bring our lunch up there?:dunno  I really thought that even with the temp drop the elevation change would have offset that.  Anyway, it's all good now.

Depends on the amount of altitude change vs the temp change. Also with colder temps metal shrinks a bit, which could lead to minor leaks! I actually like the run tires a bit softer in winter, it should increase the grip!

for every 1F of difference pressure changes by 0.052psi air pressure is not linear so the higher you are the less difference you'll see. let's say you went from 6000ft to 7000ft base of the mt. you would have had a change of 0.5psi
Going from 40F to 15F gave you a change of -1.8psi so a net change of -1.3psi. I hope I still remember it correctly lol

post #68 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 

Depends on the amount of altitude change vs the temp change. Also with colder temps metal shrinks a bit, which could lead to minor leaks! I actually like the run tires a bit softer in winter, it should increase the grip!

for every 1F of difference pressure changes by 0.052psi air pressure is not linear so the higher you are the less difference you'll see. let's say you went from 6000ft to 7000ft base of the mt. you would have had a change of 0.5psi
Going from 40F to 15F gave you a change of -1.8psi so a net change of -1.3psi. I hope I still remember it correctly lol

Well, we went form 500 feet at home to 5,500 feet  at the resort so that would be 2.5 up versus the 1.8 minus from the temp if I am understanding you correctly.

post #69 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 

Depends on the amount of altitude change vs the temp change. Also with colder temps metal shrinks a bit, which could lead to minor leaks! I actually like the run tires a bit softer in winter, it should increase the grip!

for every 1F of difference pressure changes by 0.052psi air pressure is not linear so the higher you are the less difference you'll see. let's say you went from 6000ft to 7000ft base of the mt. you would have had a change of 0.5psi
Going from 40F to 15F gave you a change of -1.8psi so a net change of -1.3psi. I hope I still remember it correctly lol

Well, we went form 500 feet at home to 5,500 feet  at the resort so that would be 2.5 up versus the 1.8 minus from the temp if I am understanding you correctly.


Yes but this is a basic formula (which could be wrong btw... it has been a while since last time I used gas laws), not considering tire temperature, actual air pressure from weather, volume changes from leaks/stretching of tire, heat dissipation and so on. :)

post #70 of 470
post #71 of 470

Did anyone else's TPS sensors have a hysterical fit driving over NY and CT potholes this weekend?       As in: tire pressures nominal, nothing at all wrong, sensor flashing on then off? 

post #72 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Did anyone else's TPS sensors have a hysterical fit driving over NY and CT potholes this weekend?       As in: tire pressures nominal, nothing at all wrong, sensor flashing on then off? 

 

Sorry, I don't run them. My light's on full time :)

post #73 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Did anyone else's TPS sensors have a hysterical fit driving over NY and CT potholes this weekend?       As in: tire pressures nominal, nothing at all wrong, sensor flashing on then off? 


Nope


Sent from my iPhone. There may be horrible grammar and misspelling involved
post #74 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Did anyone else's TPS sensors have a hysterical fit driving over NY and CT potholes this weekend?       As in: tire pressures nominal, nothing at all wrong, sensor flashing on then off? 


Everything was/is working properly with our two SUVs TPMS sensors in RI, CT, MA, and NH - despite potholes, and some cold nighttime temperatures. Our ski house had a good foot of snow leading up to this weekend and the driveway got pretty icey, and even though it was really difficult to walk on the pitched part of the driveway we had no trouble driving up and down. We didn't even have to turn off the Vehicle Stability Control/Assist to get up, nor did the dashboard light even go on indicating that it was doing its yaw control thing. I can guarantee that if I had the old 2WD sedan with full out snows it would have taken me several tries to get up, and definitely with the yaw control turned off.

post #75 of 470

I live in Minnesota. Lots of snow. I put my snow tires on in November and run them through March or April and then change to my all seasons for the rest of the year.   No question - this is the way to go. 

post #76 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 


^^^^^^  YES!!!  The WR was great and the WR G2 has been great too. We've had several sets of both and have the WR G2 currently on our small AWD/4WD SUV. There's a WR G3 out now too, so I imagine the WR G2 is pretty well phased out at this point, and there is no choice but the WR G3. I am told though that the WR G3 is even better, but they went back to directional (WR was directional, but the WR G2 wasn't). The WR G3 no longer comes big enough for our big AWD/4WD SUV but the Nokian Rotiva AT is their bigger winter rated year-round tire and that worked out well for us last winter and so far this winter. With two SUVs having 8 winter tire/wheels to store is way too much trouble when these year-round winter rated tires work so well. BTW, with both of our SUVs when the TPMS light is on then both vehicles' computers will not let you disable (turn off) the Traction Control / Vehicle Stability Control-Assist.

 

the WR G3 (the car version).... there are 2 tread patterns, depending on the size.

 

the "A" version is assymetric  (I have this)

the "D" version is directional.

 

the SUV version... they look directional.... (edit:) and found good pics on the internet showing the sidewall that indicators a specific rotation


Edited by tanscrazydaisy - 12/1/14 at 7:41am
post #77 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I got the Blizzack WS60's last year and ti was the fasted wearing snows I had, I would have been lucky to get 2 seasons out of them, let alone like my General's being able to get 2 plus selling them for $100 after. Discount Tire swapped me out of them and upgraded me to a new tires for $200, mounted and balanced so back to the Generals for me. As far as the TPMS light, it doesn't bother me at all. 

We've got Blizzack WS70 and DM-V1 on our vehicles.  Nothing unusual to report about wear, but I wonder if the generally frigid temps in the Canadian Rockies help with longevity.  They certainly are a soft grippy tire, and my mechanic emphatically warned DO NOT keep your Blizzaks on when it starts getting warm, as he said the soft compound will wear away very quickly.

 

During the shoulder seasons I phase in/out one set of tires: keeping one vehicle ready for long drives on warm roads and the other ready for early/late season blizzards and ski days.

post #78 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHRISfromRI View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Did anyone else's TPS sensors have a hysterical fit driving over NY and CT potholes this weekend?       As in: tire pressures nominal, nothing at all wrong, sensor flashing on then off? 


Everything was/is working properly with our two SUVs TPMS sensors in RI, CT, MA, and NH - despite potholes, and some cold nighttime temperatures.

 

Interesting.   Of the 5 cars we had at the house, 4 had problems.

post #79 of 470
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanmoreBruce View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

I got the Blizzack WS60's last year and ti was the fasted wearing snows I had, I would have been lucky to get 2 seasons out of them, let alone like my General's being able to get 2 plus selling them for $100 after. Discount Tire swapped me out of them and upgraded me to a new tires for $200, mounted and balanced so back to the Generals for me. As far as the TPMS light, it doesn't bother me at all. 

We've got Blizzack WS70 and DM-V1 on our vehicles.  Nothing unusual to report about wear, but I wonder if the generally frigid temps in the Canadian Rockies help with longevity.  They certainly are a soft grippy tire, and my mechanic emphatically warned DO NOT keep your Blizzaks on when it starts getting warm, as he said the soft compound will wear away very quickly.

 

During the shoulder seasons I phase in/out one set of tires: keeping one vehicle ready for long drives on warm roads and the other ready for early/late season blizzards and ski days.

Yes, we had some unusual wear coming back from Colorado this last spring with all the extra weight in the car (16 pair of skis in the Thule didn't help)  and the temps hitting the upper 80's coming through the desert. I will say we did the same trip the prior 2 years with the General Altimax and didn't get the excess wear that the Blizzaks showed. My tire guy did say that the WS60 was a one year tire and was replaced by the WS70. 

post #80 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Yes, we had some unusual wear coming back from Colorado this last spring with all the extra weight in the car (16 pair of skis in the Thule didn't help)  and the temps hitting the upper 80's coming through the desert. I will say we did the same trip the prior 2 years with the General Altimax and didn't get the excess wear that the Blizzaks showed. My tire guy did say that the WS60 was a one year tire and was replaced by the WS70. 

A 1 year tire!? :eek  I didn't realize it wore that quickly!  We've got 2 seasons on the WS70 on our minivan and there's no unusual wear, lots of life left.  I wouldn't be surprised if other tires did last longer, there is no denying that the Blizzaks have a soft compound.   Of previous tires I that I can remember I had 3 pairs of Bridgestone Winter Slalom (and/or a rebranded model from Canadian Tire) which wore pretty well, was excellent in deep snow, but wasn't nearly as good on ice as the Blizzak.  

post #81 of 470
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CanmoreBruce View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Yes, we had some unusual wear coming back from Colorado this last spring with all the extra weight in the car (16 pair of skis in the Thule didn't help)  and the temps hitting the upper 80's coming through the desert. I will say we did the same trip the prior 2 years with the General Altimax and didn't get the excess wear that the Blizzaks showed. My tire guy did say that the WS60 was a one year tire and was replaced by the WS70. 

A 1 year tire!? :eek  I didn't realize it wore that quickly!  We've got 2 seasons on the WS70 on our minivan and there's no unusual wear, lots of life left.  I wouldn't be surprised if other tires did last longer, there is no denying that the Blizzaks have a soft compound.   Of previous tires I that I can remember I had 3 pairs of Bridgestone Winter Slalom (and/or a rebranded model from Canadian Tire) which wore pretty well, was excellent in deep snow, but wasn't nearly as good on ice as the Blizzak.  

Let me clarify, it was on the market for one year. I will say, I would have been not too confident in these to get a second season out of them. Either way, I swapped put of them and am happily back back on the Generals. 

post #82 of 470

Regarding the Nokian "all weather" tires..I've had those and while they are pretty good snow tires and mediocre summer tires, they are probably the worst cold, wet weather tire I've ever had.  Brutal wet traction.  I can only guess they upped the hardness of the compound to make the blocky tread last in the heat. 

post #83 of 470
Anyone have experience with this Auto Sock thing? Apparently approved for use in several states.
8119gl4yehL._SL1500_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/AutoSock-AS645-Winter-Traction-Device/dp/B001NCHVK6/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1417541933&sr=1-1#productDetails

Looks crazy to me, so asking about actual experience here.
post #84 of 470

CDOT used the AutoSock last winter to clear bozos from I-70, and it sounds like it worked well.  Here's a story from the local news:

 

http://kdvr.com/2014/02/13/cdot-has-plans-to-avoid-repeat-of-weekend-nightmare-mountain-commute/

post #85 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Anyone have experience with this Auto Sock thing? Apparently approved for use in several states.
8119gl4yehL._SL1500_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/AutoSock-AS645-Winter-Traction-Device/dp/B001NCHVK6/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1417541933&sr=1-1#productDetails

Looks crazy to me, so asking about actual experience here.


I don't think it's approved in every state... you should check. people that have used it in snow said it works YMMV

post #86 of 470
Quote:

Originally Posted by jzamp View Post
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Looks crazy to me, so asking about actual experience here.
 

I don't think it's approved in every state... you should check. people that have used it in snow said it works YMMV

 

Apparently they are approved for use in WA and will meet requirements when chain restrictions are in place.  I'd never heard of them until today.

post #87 of 470
The only reason I'd heard of them is my daughter has been living in Tacoma the past few months, her snow tires are here, but she hasn't been able to leave to come home. She found these things and is buying two sets for when she comes home for Christmas and can swap the tires. Although really, I'd rather she stopped and got a hotel room..
post #88 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Anyone have experience with this Auto Sock thing? Apparently approved for use in several states.

http://www.amazon.com/AutoSock-AS645-Winter-Traction-Device/dp/B001NCHVK6/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1417541933&sr=1-1#productDetails

Looks crazy to me, so asking about actual experience here.

I do not have actual experience, but I did a little research because my wife's FWD car sometimes has trouble with our driveway, even with traction control and Hakkapaliitas. They look easy to put on and could be just the thing to get the car up the 100ft driveway.

 

Apparently they work well, are easy to put on and are approved in some states as a substitute for chains.

 

That said, they should also be removed immediately when you reach dirt or pavement. Their lifespan on anything but snow is very short.

 

I haven't purchased a pair yet. I still have to go out once in a while and back the car up the driveway. In the dark. Which means it may take several tries because I can't see very well. But maybe it's no harder than putting on a pair of Auto Socks in the dark.

 

In other matters, interior BC (that's British Columbia, Canada, for all you people from Away) has signs all over the place indicating that you must have winter tires, complete with snowflake, or be carrying chains from October 1 to April 30. Seems a bit extreme, since the snow around here is long gone by April 30, but, whatever. RCMP sometimes has checkpoints for seatbelts, tires and beer on your breath, but not often. I wish they would do it at the bottom of the Whitewater access road more often, since there are few things more irritating than some idiot with the wrong tires stuck sideways across the only access on a powder morning.

post #89 of 470

Is no one using Spikes-Spiders anymore? 

post #90 of 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
 

I do not have actual experience, but I did a little research because my wife's FWD car sometimes has trouble with our driveway, even with traction control and Hakkapaliitas.

 

Have you tried turning off the Traction Control before approaching your driveway, and then carrying some momentum to to help you get up? We've found that turning it off made a huge improvement in our success rate of getting up our driveway with our former 2WD and full out snow tires. We still didn't make it all of the time, but we sure did a lot better with with the TC/VSC-VSA turned off than turned on.

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