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Epic Mix and Handicap Parking - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

 

Actually, the energy expenditure of a person with a prosthetic can be twice as much as one without, depending upon the level of the amputation. That means, if the amputation is above the knee, it takes a lot more oxygen to maintain the same gait as someone without an amputation. The other issues people with amputations have is pain at the interface between the prosthetic and the remaining limb. This is the reason many people with that have had amputations choose to ski without it. The pain is increased when walking, but someone may choose to deal with it instead of crutches on snow and ice. This is the reason people with medical knowledge are consulted to determine the rules for acquiring permits and that we shouldn't judge based on quick observations.

I also know that the amputee I ski with doesn't like leaving his prosthetic around because of the a fore mentioned priced so he will often leave it in the car and hop/use his outriggers to the lift. Some places it's more convenient to use stairs then the ramp and or elevator so he will walk from the car. He leaves the pant leg rolled up on the prosthetic though so people rarely give him looks  The ski hill is about the only place he utilizes the permit though. 

post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post
 

I also know that the amputee I ski with doesn't like leaving his prosthetic around because of the a fore mentioned priced so he will often leave it in the car and hop/use his outriggers to the lift. Some places it's more convenient to use stairs then the ramp and or elevator so he will walk from the car. He leaves the pant leg rolled up on the prosthetic though so people rarely give him looks  The ski hill is about the only place he utilizes the permit though. 

 

Good point. I ski at places that have disability centers, so that's what I was thinking about. It would be scary to think of leaving something that valuable in a regular lodge.

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mustski View Post
 


A disability that causes screaming pain is not the same thing as fatigue.  Sorry.  My husband has been disabled since he was 40 years old.  He loves to ski.  The ability to park close allows him to ski when otherwise it would not be possible.  He can't buckle or unbuckle his own ski boots.  I get down on my knees and put his boots on and take them off for him.  It's not a function of age, mobility, or exhaustion.  It's a function of pain.

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post


I don't think it is appropriate to compare people when you know nothing about the other. It easy to make incorrect assumptions when you don't know the details of another's condition.

 

I never said that Mutski's husband didn't deserve a sticker. I said my father in law also has a medical need that isn't easily visible to bystanders.   I did say that at some point probably all really old people do but don't know where that need engages..

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

This is similar to the situation with my father in law.  He has pretty bad diabetes, lost some toes, but mostly he can become light headed when walking a long distance yet he looks just fine.  He delivers meals on wheels in his spare time and other charity stuff.  But, most times he can walk across the just fine.

 

On the other hand, most of us could ski longer if we could park closer, both from a fatigue standpoint and the obvious convenience standpoint.  When I'm at a certain elderly age where I tire faster than I do now I probably deserve a handicapped spot at the ski hill as much as anyone in the above type of scenario.  But, where does that point arrive, being able to ski five hours instead of four, or being able to ski two hours instead of one?

 

However, the young and otherwise healthy guy with the $20,000 prostetic that allows him 90% of the mobility that I have probably shouldn't be using the spot at the ski hill.

 

This whole thread is about speculation with regard to people we don't personally know.. i.e. based on someone's epicmix stats.  For all we know those stats were earned in a sitski.

 

Go on though..  Judge me based in what you think I meant and not what I actually meant.  H8rs gotta H8:newkeyboard:

 
 
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

 

 

 

I never said that Mutski's husband didn't deserve a sticker. I said my father in law also has a medical need that isn't easily visible to bystanders.   I did say that at some point probably all really old people do but don't know where that need engages..

 

 

 

This whole thread is about speculation with regard to people we don't personally know.. i.e. based on someone's epicmix stats.  For all we know those stats were earned in a sitski.

 

Go on though..  Judge me based in what you think I meant and not what I actually meant.  H8rs gotta H8:newkeyboard:

  You specifically compared your father in law to mustski's husband and said they had similar situations.  Perhaps if you were more clear in your writing, people would not misunderstand you.
 

post #35 of 41

Basically, back to this individual that is at the top of the EpicMix leader board.

 

If he received the placard for himself and he shouldn't have one, at least in Colorado, I think the penalty is essentially just taking it away and not being able to get one for five years.

 

If he is using someone else's placard and he/she isn't with him, he's risking them using their placard for five years, but I think it takes a couple of violations for that to happen.

 

Basically, the only person that can ask him for anything is a police officer. From what I understand, the officer can ask to see the registration that comes with the placard, but nothing about the actual disability.

post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

 

Basically, the only person that can ask him for anything is a police officer. From what I understand, the officer can ask to see the registration that comes with the placard, but nothing about the actual disability.

Yep that is probably due to HPPA regulations.  The sad thing about all this would be that the most abuse of these privileges probably happens when those that really need them need them the most... Christmas week at.....:nono: the mall.  Heck, I've been desperate and frantic enough to think.. gosh it sure would be nice to have a handicapped pass... and done it while giving a :nono: dirty look someone skipping from their car to the main entrance.  Guess the moral of the story is it isn't up to us to judge, even though we know that there is probably a lot of abuse happening.  You just don't know what you don't know..:dunno

post #37 of 41

It seems to me that if you don't have any conditions that might qualify you for a handicapped parking space, you could choose to thank your lucky stars for being temporarily abled rather than being overly worried with what other people are doing and whether have suffered enough to deserve the perk.

post #38 of 41

Why bother with the handicapped spot? Use the fire lane in front of the store. Around the holidays I was at the mall trying to get out of the parking lot and not moving due to a traffic jam caused by some idiot who had parked in the fire lane--the only lane--directly in front of Nordstrom's. Who should come out of the store and get in the car--one of my partners, who had had a C section 3 days before, and her mother, who had had a broken hip fixed in surgery 2 weeks before. They were shopping for hats to wear to the baby's ritual circumcision. (The male kind, in case you're wondering). Tough ladies.

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

It seems to me that if you don't have any conditions that might qualify you for a handicapped parking space, you could choose to thank your lucky stars for being temporarily abled rather than being overly worried with what other people are doing and whether have suffered enough to deserve the perk.

I had a handicap tag for 6 wks or so after my surgery last summer. I didn't really use it very often, because it wasn't that big of a deal for me to walk in a cast and I was craving the exercise, but I did use it when I needed to pick up DD and her friends after the One Direction concert! lol, that was useful. (Mostly, if I felt like I needed it, it was waaaay too crowded to want to be in that place anyway)

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

I had a handicap tag for 6 wks or so after my surgery last summer. I didn't really use it very often, because it wasn't that big of a deal for me to walk in a cast and I was craving the exercise, but I did use it when I needed to pick up DD and her friends after the One Direction concert! lol, that was useful. (Mostly, if I felt like I needed it, it was waaaay too crowded to want to be in that place anyway)

 

 

LOL One Direction!  My day for stuff like that is drawing near.  Probably next year.  

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

 

 

LOL @ One Direction!  My day for stuff like that is drawing near.  Probably next year.  

Mine passed quite quickly ... now she drives herself to Red Rocks ....

 

Also: I had a point for posting that previous post, and I don't remember what it was. heh. I think it had to do with the fact that it's not that difficult to get a placard even if you don't really need it that badly.  And at a ski area, really, how many people really need it? I mean, proportionately. My first job was at some tennis courts, the entire front row, about six spots, was reserved for handicap. They were always empty. I mean, sure every once in a while someone's grandmother would come watch or whatever, but no one ever parked there.

 

So that is a little bit on the other side of it, but I don't mean it in a bad way. If you have a tag, park there, I don't care. Some people need it, but really, they are easy to get, and most recipients could probably get by without it, if you want to get picky. Therefore, it's silly to judge. 

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