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Lookin for a ski for park and tight glades

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Signed up on here in the hopes that you guys could help me out this year :)

 

First off I work at a ski shop and we supply Head, Rossignol, Viole, G3, and Scott skis. I can get any of these companies or their affiliates at pretty much half price so unfortunately I'm all but limited to them. I'm buying two pairs this year and I'm pretty much set for a powder ski... But what I still need in a ski:

 

- maneuvers through tight glades (and moguls) really well

- twin tip for park

- handles well at speed

 

The Rev 85 Pro, for example, would be a really good choice except that the Rev line doesn't have a true twin tip, so it's my last resort. Also I've been reading a lot of forum posts on here and people have mentioned the Head Monster 78, the Volkl 724 Pro, and the Nordica Top Fuel which have sounded really good, but none of those are available to me because they're either no longer sold or I can't get a discount on them.

 

I appreciate any help :D everyone here seems pretty knowledgeable!

post #2 of 15

Head- The Caddy  http://www.head.com/ski/products/skis/park-pipe/?region=us

Rossignol- Slat      http://www.rossignol.com/US/US/slat--2014--RADMD01--product--alpine-men-skis.html   

Scott- Jib TW         https://www.scott-sports.com/us/en/products/2322819992184/SCOTT-Jib-TW-Ski/

 

 

All three of these options are really nice skis for what you are asking for, the Slat would be my first choice based on your limited info supplied. The Caddy is probably a better choice if you are lighter weight and live somewhere with not much snow. The Scott is designed by one of the very best park skiers on earth and might be the best park option.

 

As far as "working in a shop"...

 

 

You should have access to catalogs, training websites like 3point5, rep clinics and, hopefully, experienced coworkers. Utilize these resources, they are a much more reliable source than anonymous folks on the internet. Honest*.

 

 

 

*just a little good-natured ribbing, I know the internet doesn't convey tone very well, so please understand I'm kidding around... mostly, like 95%. or maybe 85%, but I'm mostly kidding (but if you do work in a shop and interact with customers please learn the product).

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Damn I knew you guys would help me out :)

 

I've definitely had a look through our stock at the shop and know it all (that's why I have my pow skis picked out) but outside of what we've got on the wall I haven't had a chance to do much research and also haven't really known where to start. Thanks for the pointer to 3point5 thought! I'll suggest to the owner that we get in on that. Rep clinics for the most part are scheduled for a few weeks from now. Anyway now to the fun part..

 

They all look pretty sweet. I had the Jib in my head because I've mounted a few of those which were brought in on special order, but I never really thought of it as a maneuverable ski. As far as I can tell the edge and the swing weight weren't designed for throwing the ski around in snow; but rather just in the air or to hop on a rail.

 

Is it right to say the Jib would work for 70% of time in the park and 30% ripping glades and moguls, the Slat would be more 40% park and 60% tight turns, and the Caddy would be somewhere in the middle maybe at 50-50?

 

Right now it looks like the Slat's gonna be the way to go. I'm finding trees or buildings jumps out of bounds more often than training park, so whatever park ski is best for dodging trees will probably be my choice.

 

 

thanks for all your help man... any other suggestions always appreciated!

post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazingPenguin View Post
 

 

Is it right to say the Jib would work for 70% of time in the park and 30% ripping glades and moguls, the Slat would be more 40% park and 60% tight turns, and the Caddy would be somewhere in the middle maybe at 50-50?

 

 

I'd put it more at:

Jib 80% park 20% all mountain

Caddy 45% park 55% all mountain, the 84mm waist plus slight tip and tail rocker make this maybe the best bump ski of the bunch.

Slat 30% park 70% all mountain, as well as probably the most stable ski at speed as well as widest and most rockered making it very versatile.

 

where do you ski (region)?

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Lake Louise in the Rockies (Canada) has been my my home Hill for years but this year since everything costs half as much as usual I'm really hoping to do a lot of trips to Fernie, Castle, Revelstoke, and maybe Jackson Hole. I want to hunt down the powder this year but I realize that when the family goes skiing that won't really be possible at Louise...

Also I know that the thinner waist make the Caddy a slightly better bump ski but judging by its rocker and sidecut/edge hold the Slat would still do me well among the bumps right?
post #6 of 15

Yes, the Slat would be great. It might be too wide if you were skiing in say, South eastern US... but now that I see you are in an area with snow, it would be my first choice of these skis for you.

post #7 of 15
K2 pretty much defined this category (ah, still remember the public enemy), I'd look at the Shredittor 92 (a ski on my own short list). Fits your bill moving forwards and backwards
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazingPenguin View Post

 

First off I work at a ski shop and we supply Head, Rossignol, Viole, G3, and Scott skis. I can get any of these companies or their affiliates at pretty much half price so unfortunately I'm all but limited to them. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

K2 pretty much defined this category (ah, still remember the public enemy), I'd look at the Shredittor 92 (a ski on my own short list). Fits your bill moving forwards and backwards

No, it doesn't.

 

Part of being good at giving ski advice is listening to the customer's needs and wants and then putting their needs in front of your own preferences. Not trying to be harsh, just trying to be a good (professional) example to our new friend, the flammable spheniscidae. Your ski advice is good, but his stated wants/needs eliminate it from consideration.

post #9 of 15
Oh, sorry....visit a shop that carries K2 and grab a Shredittor 92. Park and tight trees : this is the ski,
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Looked it up and it was definitely worth a mention, thanks man. Depending on what price I can get the Slat for maybe the Shreditor won't be that much more. But like I said lol if I can get the Slat for 300 less then that's like 6 more days of skiing smile.gif
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

 

Part of being good at giving ski advice is listening to the customer's needs and wants and then putting their needs in front of your own preferences. Not trying to be harsh, just trying to be a good (professional) example to our new friend, the flammable spheniscidae. Your ski advice is good, but his stated wants/needs eliminate it from consideration.

 

[rant on] How many husbands come in for skis for the wife and they are on say a Mantra..to get a Aura for the wife or a Kendo/Kenja or Bonafide/Samba...dealing with this with skis is one thing...but when it comes to boots...Oy-vey. [/rant off]

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazingPenguin View Post

Lake Louise in the Rockies (Canada) has been my my home Hill for years but this year since everything costs half as much as usual I'm really hoping to do a lot of trips to Fernie, Castle, Revelstoke, and maybe Jackson Hole. I want to hunt down the powder this year but I realize that when the family goes skiing that won't really be possible at Louise...

Also I know that the thinner waist make the Caddy a slightly better bump ski but judging by its rocker and sidecut/edge hold the Slat would still do me well among the bumps right?

Just out of curiosity but when you say you want a park ski what are you planning on doing with it? A pipe ski is a completely different animal then a slopestyle and if all you really want to do is hit the occasional booter and be able to ski switch I wouldn't even bother getting a park focused ski but a twin tip all mountain instead. Unless you plan to start doing a lot of spinning and jibbing you won't really see a benefit  

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Honestly I should probably be looking for closer to an all-mountain. I trained freestyle for several years so at this point it feels like a necessity to be able to ski switch but I definitely won't be looping the park more than 10 times a day. I'd want a ski I can use to hit rails and spin hard without a worry and that's really the only thing I need in the park.

More important is that it'll hold an edge and avoid chatter at speed and still be super manoeuvrable in tight trees.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlazingPenguin View Post

Honestly I should probably be looking for closer to an all-mountain. I trained freestyle for several years so at this point it feels like a necessity to be able to ski switch but I definitely won't be looping the park more than 10 times a day. I'd want a ski I can use to hit rails and spin hard without a worry and that's really the only thing I need in the park.

More important is that it'll hold an edge and avoid chatter at speed and still be super manoeuvrable in tight trees.

 

Okay well if you have a background in it that makes a lot more sense. Honestly there are quite a few park skis these days that will work well for you and I know you wanted to stay with the brands you mentioned but none of them with the exception of possibly Scott really make great park skis anymore. If you get on 3point5/promotive you'll have access to High Society that makes a great all mountain ski with park bias that would be pretty much perfect for what you want. You can also find Armada new old stock for like $200 if you ask around. If you can find a few years old Thalls that would be sick.I picked up a pair and had two people try and buy them off me the first day out. 

 

Just checked promotive and Armada is on there too now so definitely check them out

post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, thanks for all the help so far. I've realized that I should be looking more for a maneuverable, tight-turning ski I can take through the trees but still use in the park.

 

So I think the Rossi Storm or the Rossi Smash are looking pretty good right now. The storm if I decide I'll do more park this year or the Smash if I think there'll be more snow.

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