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Foot Numbness

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi All...

 

I definitely need some help with this issue that has been bothering me for a couple years. I have seen a few bootfitters, but it is still persisting. Whenever skiing, or even standing in my boots at home, I will get numbness in the front of my foot that will start in the balls of my feet and go onto the toes. When I take my boots off, it can last for 30 minutes with 0 feeling in my toes. My info:

 

Super narrow heel

On a board, I measure around a 26 and use a 25.5 boot. My foot measures a 96 last.

I have been in the Salomon x-max 120 and Lange XT 130 LV

Very agressive skier

I have medium-low arches, instaprint and quickbed custom footbeds

Very limited dosiflexion with a heel lift in my boots

5'9 and 170 Lbs.

 

Would the width effect this? I don't really know what to do because not much is helping. It really ruins my day because I end up having to take my boots off by the 3rd or 4th run. ANY advice would be appreciated! Thank you

post #2 of 14

Can't see your feet from here but-----The boots you mentioned  might be just on the narrow side enough to push your met heads together and pinch the Dorsal Pedis nerve which would cause the problem you describe.

 

Put the boots on and wait for the numbness to start---pull the boots and socks off one at a time and look at the sides of your foot (first and fifth metatarsal heads) for redness which would indicate pressure.  If this is the case a simple stretch to the shell should fix the problem.

 

On the other hand, if you happen to have a square ended foot that doesn't fit up into the toe box too well, this could also push your met heads together causing the problem.

 

How do you tighten the buckles on your boots?

 

mike

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Mike... That could definitely be it. My lower buckles are all on the first or second notch and I'm usually conscience not to overbuckle. I think the toe box being expanded could be the issue so I'll give that a try. Thank you! 

post #4 of 14

The major cause of numbness in the forefoot/toes is ankle range of motion limitations.  When seated with the lower leg exactly vertical, you should be able to lift the forefoot off the floor with the heel planted to the point where two fingers can fit under the outside (little toe side) of the ball of the foot.  If there is not that much flexibility in the ankle, a heel lift glued under the liner will help reduce the problem.  Take the forward lean spoiler out of the boo'ts shaft.  Attach a Booster strap to the inner side of the boot's spine and harness the tongue in to reduce the amount of flex needed to star the turn (allowing a more upright leg angle.)

Remolding the forefoot in the InstaPrint footbed allowing more depth under the balls of the feet also helps.

cheers

Bob G  

BootDoctors Telluride

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootDr1 View Post

The major cause of numbness in the forefoot/toes is ankle range of motion limitations.  When seated with the lower leg exactly vertical, you should be able to lift the forefoot off the floor with the heel planted to the point where two fingers can fit under the outside (little toe side) of the ball of the foot.  If there is not that much flexibility in the ankle, a heel lift glued under the liner will help reduce the problem.  Take the forward lean spoiler out of the boo'ts shaft.  Attach a Booster strap to the inner side of the boot's spine and harness the tongue in to reduce the amount of flex needed to star the turn (allowing a more upright leg angle.)
Remolding the forefoot in the InstaPrint footbed allowing more depth under the balls of the feet also helps.
cheers
Bob G  
BootDoctors Telluride

Bob... Thank you very much for the response. I am aware of my limited ROM (around 5 degrees) and there has been a heel lift put into my boots already to account for this. Skis great, but the numbness still persists as often as ever. I know bootfitting on the internet is hard, but I don't have time to go to a very very good fitter as there are none within 2 hours. I appreciate you trying to help. If this was your client, what would you check next besides ankle ROM? Forefoot boot width?
post #6 of 14

ankle dorsiflexion is one of the causes of many forefoot problems. from what you said the ankle ROM has been addressed with a heel lift. at 5 degrees of ankle ROM, you probably need a LARGE lift. with the raising of the heel, it can take a medium height instep and push it into the roof of the boot making it appear to the boot as a high instep. nerve and bloodflow to the toes  are compromised when there is instep pressure, perform a tongue-ectomy or an up stretch of the shell , or both.

 

jim

post #7 of 14

100% agree with everything everyone has said so far, but try this as well.... place a magazine on the floor something with some guts 5 or 6 mm thick, now stand with the heels of your boots on the magazine, does this speed up the numbness onset...now try with the toes on the magazine, does this slow it down?

 

it is most likely the lack of flexion which is causing the problem but this test may help to show if the binding delta is accentuating it... depending on your skis you will being tipped forward a little or a lot, and with a small boot this tipping is increased, it may be that adding a lifter plate under your toe piece of your binding  will balance you out and reduce the pain

 

good luck getting it sorted

Colin

post #8 of 14

The heel lift is step one.  But using step 2 and 3 will continue the road to solving the issue. The Booster strap will help.  Remolding the forefoot with more depth under the met heads will help too.

The InstaPrint  X Sport footbed has a configuration where the plastic stops right behind the met heads.  The met heads are cushioned with an accommodating eva foam.  When I have a client with limited dorsiflexion, this footbed is my go to; not the blue ski wide blank. 

It is possible to excavate material from the boot boaard under the forefoot and the ledges on both sides of the boot board to increase met head accomodation and further reduce the compression.

cheers

Bob

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the replies. Super helpful and I appreciate it a lot. I know online boot fitting is no easy task. Definitely think it is an issue of needing more space with the met heads in the boot, but I do not think that I will be able to gain access to the Instaprint X Sport without seeing one of you. I need to get them remolded to add depth for sure... Would you expand and press out the toe box of the boot as mike suggested? Both of these seem like logical solutions that may work even better if I applied both. Thank you!  

post #10 of 14

Mike made the suggestion to expand the forefoot in his first post.

 

forefoot width is a possibility, however your foot is on the narrow side for the boots you have described causing a problem, and you have 2 different footbeds, if well made, that should have your foot stable and the shortest and narrowest that it would be.

 

using your numbers.....measured 96mm forefoot, x-max 120 approx 97.5mm in forefoot dimension in a size 25.5 with a round open toe box, lange xt 130 lv approx 96 in a 25.5. with a fairly tapered toe box on the lateral side of the foot. the point is that both of these boots run wider than promoted by the manufacturer. the only info missing to us is the actual shape of your toes and their width. 

 

can you take a picture that clearly shows the front of your feet and post it on this thread? that will help us to either know that you need a shell shape change in  the front half of the boot, or lead you back to some of the other possibilities that have been mentioned by bob, colin, and myself.

 

a second photo of your feet next to the boot toe from above would also be very telling.

 

jim

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Jim... With all of this in mind, I had the Insta-Print remolded to add more depth underneath the met heads. This, in conjunction with the large heel lift, has seemed to do the trick... kind of. The recently added larger heel lift (due to some medical ankle issues that have reduced mobility) has put too much pressure on my instep. When I took my socks off, there were obvious red lines from the pressure  right on my instep. I need to ski for a day to be sure, but with my narrow foot I am lead to believe (as you stated) that it is not completely a forefoot width issue. Looking at the X-Max Liner, there is almost no foam in the tongue in that area to excavate, but that seems to be the route to take in my case. Hmm.. How to go about this.

Thank you for the insight. 


Edited by eastskier27 - 11/16/14 at 4:27pm
post #12 of 14

It is possible to push the instep of a boot upward to relieve pressure in that area.  One of the tools available to do this is shown below:

 

http://southernski.com/toe-jam-spreader-instep-jack.html

 

we have moved the instep of a boot upward by a quarter of an inch with this tool.

 

mike

post #13 of 14

the top plastic skin of the x max tongues you are talking about are 2 to 3 mm thick over the mid foot bump. completely removed over the pressure point will give you as much space as you took away by raising the heel lift, and it will be specific relief of pressure to nerves and blood flow. the lange has a s%&t ton of fit foam and other unnecessary accoutrements over the instep that can be removed/sculpted/thinned to make a specific pocket for the instep bump.

 

this work combined with a shell up stretch, will give you more than enough room to relieve the pressure over the top of your foot that is causing the sensation at your ball of foot and toes.

 

jim

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you! Will try this out and let you know. I appreciate it

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