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Should I or Shouldn't I? [replace Volkl Unlimited AC7.4, started skiing two years ago, Tahoe]

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Ski on what I have for at least a little longer or spring for something new! (Of course my heart tells me newer is better.)

 

What I have now

Volvo Unlimited AC7.4 170 (Bought used in total unknown condition and pretty  thrashed)

 

About me. 

38yo

200 lbs 

6ft

 

2 seasons under my belt and am comfortable on medium blue runs. 

Ski in the tahoe area (squaw, alpine, etc). 

 

There are some great deals on skis on eBay and I really want to justify buying something. Should I spend some more time on what I have or get something new?

 

I'm thinking of something like a q-98, bonafide, experience 88. 

Would those be appropriate if I did decide to get something? between 175-180?

 

Thanks!

Sean

 

Mod note: moved to Ski Gear, added to title

post #2 of 10

Paging @Philpug

post #3 of 10

If you end up using the new equipment and it makes a difference to you, then the answer is yes, you should buy it.  This stuff wears out or goes obsolete.

If you are spending more than a few days on the mountain, or you have a season pass, then you should be using modern equipment that can increase your fun.  

 

So the justification is you're you're already committed time and money to have runs on the hill, and you are maximizing fun with the final factor of using good equipment.

An analogy would be like buying an expensive sports car, then saying you can't afford gas to drive it.

 

 

I suppose though this depends on your financial situation and what you can afford.  If the skis mean you're putting it on credit and eating ramen, perhaps you need to work on your income stream rather then your skiing.  I think though in general most people here in general have dispensable income to spend on this hobby.

 

 

BTW, you said you ski at squaw/alpine.  If you have the pass, then on weekdays you have 50% off demos, which is a very generous perk bringing the price to about $35 with as many swaps as you want.  The squaw demo center does have a good selection of demo skis (alpine a little less) , but may not bring them all out until the mountain is better covered (even though they also reserve the right to charge you for damage).  Because the last few seasons were so bad, many of the demo skis are basically new.

 

If you demo, then you can find out whether you are having more fun on the better skis, or if what you really need are lessons or skills improvements.

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies. It's not really a matter of being able to afford it but whether it'd be worthwhile given my relative inexperience to get new skis. Would I even notice? I haven't skied on anything but the volkis. 

 

I have a season pass to squaw and plan on at least 12 days this winter. Don't know if any of those days will be weekdays to get the demo discount. 

 

Now I just need to get it through committee;)

post #5 of 10
Boots come first.

Find a great boot fitter, they may be able to get you into last years boots and save you some money. The best ski is just another ski if your boots don't transfer your thought's to the ski.

paging @Phil

http://starthaus.com/contact/
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterneRouge View PostWould I even notice? I haven't skied on anything but the volkis. 

 

Yes.    And for someone at your skill level a different ski could be more functionally enabling than for someone at a higher level.
 

The problem with your skill level is that you don't know what you want or could best use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterneRouge View Post
 

 

I have a season pass to squaw and plan on at least 12 days this winter. Don't know if any of those days will be weekdays to get the demo discount. 

 

Now I just need to get it through committee;)

 

 

Will the committee approve getting a wider pair for deep or manky days and keeping the Volkls for no-new-snow days?   If so, go 95-109 and don't bother with the 75-95mm waist range.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Yes.    And for someone at your skill level a different ski could be more functionally enabling than for someone at a higher level.
 

The problem with your skill level is that you don't know what you want or could best use.

 

 

Will the committee approve getting a wider pair for deep or manky days and keeping the Volkls for no-new-snow days?   If so, go 95-109 and don't bother with the 75-95mm waist range.


So the Volkis are worth keeping? It would make getting something like a q98 make a little more sense. I think...

I've already taken care of the boots, got a good deal on some 2014 rossi all track 100s. 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterneRouge View Post
 


So the Volkis are worth keeping? It would make getting something like a q98 make a little more sense. I think...

I've already taken care of the boots, got a good deal on some 2014 rossi all track 100s. 

 

Well, sure, I mean all we know is the model and not the shape they're in.   

 

Based on just the model, they're probably OK to have for no-snow days, they're probably a reasonable ski to take lessons on, they're probably a reasonable ski to take into bumps,  and they're probably a reasonable ski to learn to wax and tune on.

 

The words 'good deal' in the same breath as 'boots' just raised the "OMG HE BOUGHT TOO BIG" hackles in at least half the readers of your thread.  

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterneRouge View Post
 


So the Volkis are worth keeping? It would make getting something like a q98 make a little more sense. I think...

I've already taken care of the boots, got a good deal on some 2014 rossi all track 100s. 

Worth keeping as compared to what alternate option?

You can always keep the skis and take them out for fun, they have practically little to no sale value.  

Take them out, don't take them. it's your choice.

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Well, sure, I mean all we know is the model and not the shape they're in.   

 

Based on just the model, they're probably OK to have for no-snow days, they're probably a reasonable ski to take lessons on, they're probably a reasonable ski to take into bumps,  and they're probably a reasonable ski to learn to wax and tune on.

 

The words 'good deal' in the same breath as 'boots' just raised the "OMG HE BOUGHT TOO BIG" hackles in at least half the readers of your thread.  


Ahh, see that's the mistake I made LAST year:)

Got some used dalbello (sp?) in 30.5. 

Way way way way too big. 

 

Educated myself a little and actually paid attention to how the boot fit before buying and ended up with a 28.5 

Learned that ski boots fit NOTHING like regular shoes, boot, etc. 

 

I'll keep them (since they are worthless;) and work on getting something new soon. 

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