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Waxing Irons Need Tuning Too!

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

If you have not checked your iron, or got a new one, it may need some work.  See the video to see what I am saying.  Awesome waxer's know all about this stuff.  This is more from me to help those who need it.  We all start on square one.  Enjoy.

 

post #2 of 18

I  must have missed the step where you adjusted the frequency of the embedded ultrasonic transducers.;)

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

I  must have missed the step where you adjusted the frequency of the embedded ultrasonic transducers.;)


Humor is always good!  But really, those irons with the ultrasonic transducers are too spendy for me and they are made in China too!

 

I wonder....does any other country make a ski iron besides China?

post #4 of 18

I'm not sure where my thrift store Black&Decker travel steam iron was made but it keeps a steady temp and cost me $10. I wax my skis in the living room of my ski chalet/5th wheel trailer so I don't scrape or polish either. I wax regularly to feed my bases, not to race.:devil:

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

I'm not sure where my thrift store Black&Decker travel steam iron was made but it keeps a steady temp and cost me $10. I wax my skis in the living room of my ski chalet/5th wheel trailer so I don't scrape or polish either. I wax regularly to feed my bases, not to race.:devil:


Don't over feed those bases!  They will become overweight!  :rotflmao:

post #6 of 18

I've always been under the impression that my iron was supposed to be shaped? Have I been wrong?

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

I'm not sure where my thrift store Black&Decker travel steam iron was made but it keeps a steady temp and cost me $10. I wax my skis in the living room of my ski chalet/5th wheel trailer so I don't scrape or polish either. I wax regularly to feed my bases, not to race.:devil:

Well, mine was from Wal Mart but I do it exactly the same way. My tuning shop is a re-purposed bedroom now used as an art studio/work room/storage room, so I can't let anything fall on the carpet that won't come out easily.

 

How do you tune a re-purposed steam iron anyway?

post #8 of 18

I used a regular steam iron for many years and I'm not really convinced that the dedicated ski iron I have now works any better.
 

A dry iron looks better built than most ski wax irons ;)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Electric-CP43001-Classic-Iron/dp/B000VU9T74

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by awowadas View Post
 

I've always been under the impression that my iron was supposed to be shaped? Have I been wrong?


I guess that depends on the shape!

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrison Claystone View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post
 

I'm not sure where my thrift store Black&Decker travel steam iron was made but it keeps a steady temp and cost me $10. I wax my skis in the living room of my ski chalet/5th wheel trailer so I don't scrape or polish either. I wax regularly to feed my bases, not to race.:devil:

Well, mine was from Wal Mart but I do it exactly the same way. My tuning shop is a re-purposed bedroom now used as an art studio/work room/storage room, so I can't let anything fall on the carpet that won't come out easily.

 

How do you tune a re-purposed steam iron anyway?


Same deal.  Make sure it's smooth and not edge high.

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldjeep View Post
 

I used a regular steam iron for many years and I'm not really convinced that the dedicated ski iron I have now works any better.
 

A dry iron looks better built than most ski wax irons ;)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Continental-Electric-CP43001-Classic-Iron/dp/B000VU9T74


An iron like that will not flow the wax as even if you do a light layer of the spendy stuff.  It's going to push the wax off the ski.  Ski irons are more square.  The more square shape helps the wax to spread more even.  It will not hold heat well as a ski iron either.  Never said it couldn't work, but why?  The Toko T-8 is only like 60 dollars.

post #12 of 18
The Toko T8 I bought last fall was so concave (railed, I guess) that it scraped my base edges and wouldn't melt wax down the center of the bases unless I ironed one side of the ski at a time, and when I used more wax for hot scrapes the concave surface on the liquid wax created a lot of suction. And this even on flat freshly ground bases! I started sanding it flat at the end of the season, but I got a bit disgusted when I realized I'd obliterated the outer ends of the shallow grooves from much of the base plate's edges while I was was still far from flattening the concave center. mad.gif

Meanwhile, I picked up a little Wintersteiger iron that's much flatter and holds temperature as well as the Toko. I guess I should give the T8 another try, though; maybe the flattened outer edges of the base plate allow the iron to at least melt wax down the middle of the ski and help with the suction.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

The Toko T8 I bought last fall was so concave (railed, I guess) that it scraped my base edges and wouldn't melt wax down the center of the bases unless I ironed one side of the ski at a time, and when I used more wax for hot scrapes the concave surface on the liquid wax created a lot of suction. And this even on flat freshly ground bases! I started sanding it flat at the end of the season, but I got a bit disgusted when I realized I'd obliterated the outer ends of the shallow grooves from much of the base plate's edges while I was was still far from flattening the concave center. mad.gif

Meanwhile, I picked up a little Wintersteiger iron that's much flatter and holds temperature as well as the Toko. I guess I should give the T8 another try, though; maybe the flattened outer edges of the base plate allow the iron to at least melt wax down the middle of the ski and help with the suction.


Sounds like you got a really bad one.  Mine is fine now.

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

The Toko T8 I bought last fall was so concave (railed, I guess) that it scraped my base edges and wouldn't melt wax down the center of the bases unless I ironed one side of the ski at a time, and when I used more wax for hot scrapes the concave surface on the liquid wax created a lot of suction. And this even on flat freshly ground bases! I started sanding it flat at the end of the season, but I got a bit disgusted when I realized I'd obliterated the outer ends of the shallow grooves from much of the base plate's edges while I was was still far from flattening the concave center. mad.gif


Meanwhile, I picked up a little Wintersteiger iron that's much flatter and holds temperature as well as the Toko. I guess I should give the T8 another try, though; maybe the flattened outer edges of the base plate allow the iron to at least melt wax down the middle of the ski and help with the suction.


Sounds like you got a really bad one.  Mine is fine now.
I was convinced it was my skis that were railed, even though they'd just been ground. It wasn't until it did the same on another pair that I thought to check the iron. redface.gif
post #15 of 18

Thankfully, I didn't learn about the "hanging bur" until I read it on these forums; my iron has structure to spread the wax.  It has a pretty big solid base plate for steady temp too. 

BTW, the bur never bothered me, but I always wanted my edges locked in anyways (only recently (last decade or so) decided to re-investigate and improve my non-locked in turns).

 

Thanks for the video Jacques; I'll check for flatness.

 

IMG_0202.jpg

 

IMG_0201.jpg

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

Smooth, flat, and with structure is good!  Maybe even round the edges just a bit on the clothing irons. 

post #17 of 18

I like most started off with irons purchased at Goodwill, I had a collection of everyday irons and travel irons for travel. I made a temperature control using a dimmer and a metal electrical box to dial in the heat which was necessary for the travel irons as most that I have have no heat control. One day in REI at the end of the ski season I saw a Swix T75 FX for half price $20, how could I lose? Well the first time I used it I found like Jacques, mine was railed pretty bad, that it took several hours to make it flat. Although the sole (base) seems to be aluminum, it is a alloy that is pretty hard to sand. I went along with that iron for several years until Artech had a end of the season, half off sale on a Toko T14 Digital iron. Certainly a much nicer iron but it too was not flat, although not as bad as the Swix. I really like the digital feature of the T14 and the thicker sole, seems to hold temp really well plus you know when it has achieved the target temp. I still use a old Black & Decker up at the ski cabin so yes you can do a good job with any of them it just does not have the quick temp response of the digital iron, if that matters to you.

post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertRS View Post
 

I like most started off with irons purchased at Goodwill, I had a collection of everyday irons and travel irons for travel. I made a temperature control using a dimmer and a metal electrical box to dial in the heat which was necessary for the travel irons as most that I have have no heat control. One day in REI at the end of the ski season I saw a Swix T75 FX for half price $20, how could I lose? Well the first time I used it I found like Jacques, mine was railed pretty bad, that it took several hours to make it flat. Although the sole (base) seems to be aluminum, it is a alloy that is pretty hard to sand. I went along with that iron for several years until Artech had a end of the season, half off sale on a Toko T14 Digital iron. Certainly a much nicer iron but it too was not flat, although not as bad as the Swix. I really like the digital feature of the T14 and the thicker sole, seems to hold temp really well plus you know when it has achieved the target temp. I still use a old Black & Decker up at the ski cabin so yes you can do a good job with any of them it just does not have the quick temp response of the digital iron, if that matters to you.


Good info Robert.  Thanks!

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