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Where to ski in Colorado? [moved to Denver] - Page 2

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

@skiNEwhere mentioned Prima Cornice, so this is where I win the argument by mentioning East Vail. Game, set, match.
Easy there killer. I didn't realize we were in a game, and even if we were East Vail is OOB.

One trail doesn't make a mountain steep though, which is why as a whole Vail is considered flat.
post #32 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post

Easy there killer. I didn't realize we were in a game, and even if we were East Vail is OOB.

One trail doesn't make a mountain steep though, which is why as a whole Vail is considered flat.

Now that we gave nailed down how awesome the terrain is, the next trump is the epic pass. The best value in skiing- for a nominaI fee, I can stand in line an unlimited number of times at major resorts all over the country while fiddling with Epicmix on my phone.
post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post


Now that we gave nailed down how awesome the terrain is, the next trump is the epic pass. The best value in skiing- for a nominaI fee, I can stand in line an unlimited number of times at major resorts all over the country while fiddling with Epicmix on my phone.


Well, I won't claim that Breckenridge is uncrowded.  But with the opening of Peak 6 last year, the lift lines were much shorter.  And just like everything, knowledge is king.  There's places to ski that have lots of challenge and where the lift lines are no more than 5 minutes.  And there's places where you can choose to ski where you can stand in line for a long time.

 

Anachronism, you like to disparage the Vail resorts and there is some justification in it.  But the quality of skiing is a lot higher than you give credit.

 

Mike

post #34 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgiblin415 View Post
 

. I would skip keystone. 

 



Would others that know Keystone concur with this?
I have skied Keystone only a couple days and it was some time ago. I skied a glade called Pika in The Outback Section that was fairly tight and had some length. I skied one of the bowls served by the $5 cat ride above The Outback. Believe it was Puma Bowl to skier's left. It was single black diamond at most, but had about a foot of fun untracked fresh snow the time I was there. Also, there were several fully bumped up runs of decent length on North Peak. I thought I saw some interesting stuff and little cliff drops in the woods (The Windows?) while riding the Outpost gondola from Dercum Mtn to North Peak? If you take the $5 cat ride above The Outback is there anything to skier's right in North Bowl or glades below it that is particularly challenging?
Thanks.


I think you did a pretty good job of summarizing the more advance terrain at Keystone.  The trees and glades off the Outback are excellent as are the bump runs on North Peak.  And midweek, Keystone is empty so fresh snow lasts all day.

post #35 of 37

I did the opposite as you, lived near Denver and went west and now ski at Kirkwood.

 

 

You may aswell try every area on your epic pass but I bet you'll like abasin the most. Vail/Breck/Keystone are good mtns but draw an impressive crowd and the terrain is probably not gonna get you fired up like chair 10 or KT.

 

Get a Loveland 4 pack on days you don't want to deal with the epic crowds. LL has a very similar vibe as Kirkwood although there's tons of flat spots and the steeps are pretty short....it is your best bet locally if you want to actually ski powderIMO.

 

Also I would set aside some time to try some different areas. Crested Butte, Telluride and locally Winter Park is where I'd start.

post #36 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Because of it's continental snow pack, Colorado doesn't have as many inbounds steep rocky chutes like Palisades or the Cirque. What it does have, are long sustained steep pitches. The best of which are in Aspen, CB, Telluride and Silverton.


This means that you can't count on many of those steep areas in Colorado being skiable until February.  This is almost routine at A-Basin, and CB has areas like Third Bowl and Banana/Funnel that never open at all in many seasons. Save those excursions to the more distant areas not on your pass for February/March.

 

So my first advice is to stick with your big Epic Resorts in December/January, realizing you may find crowds unacceptable on peak weekends/holidays.  These threads always get into the "Vail is too flat" argument.  While it lacks Squaw-style steeps, there's enough variety plus high snowfall (similar to Winter Park and trailing only Wolf and Steamboat in CO) to keep most advanced skiers entertained for a long time IMHO.   Beaver Creek is where you want to go on the crowd avoidance days. The high alpine at Breck is the most convenient area for steeps until A-Basin gets covered, but it's wind exposed and takes some time to fill in also.

 

You have just left CA after 3 quite dismal years at Squaw.  Those kind of seasons are less than half as frequent in CO.  However the big years when you can be skiing steeps in early/mid-December occasionally in the Sierra are extremely rare in CO.  You should plan on skiing the late season intensively.  April is in many respects the best month in Summit County. All terrain is open, crowds are way down,  the altitude preserves packed powder conditions as well as anywhere (comparable to Mammoth), and the snowfall decrease from March to April is slight, so you're still getting powder days.

post #37 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 


This means that you can't count on many of those steep areas in Colorado being skiable until February.  This is almost routine at A-Basin, and CB has areas like Third Bowl and Banana/Funnel that never open at all in many seasons. Save those excursions to the more distant areas not on your pass for February/March.

 

So my first advice is to stick with your big Epic Resorts in December/January, realizing you may find crowds unacceptable on peak weekends/holidays.  These threads always get into the "Vail is too flat" argument.  While it lacks Squaw-style steeps, there's enough variety plus high snowfall (similar to Winter Park and trailing only Wolf and Steamboat in CO) to keep most advanced skiers entertained for a long time IMHO.   Beaver Creek is where you want to go on the crowd avoidance days. The high alpine at Breck is the most convenient area for steeps until A-Basin gets covered, but it's wind exposed and takes some time to fill in also.

 

You have just left CA after 3 quite dismal years at Squaw.  Those kind of seasons are less than half as frequent in CO.  However the big years when you can be skiing steeps in early/mid-December occasionally in the Sierra are extremely rare in CO.  You should plan on skiing the late season intensively.  April is in many respects the best month in Summit County. All terrain is open, crowds are way down,  the altitude preserves packed powder conditions as well as anywhere (comparable to Mammoth), and the snowfall decrease from March to April is slight, so you're still getting powder days.

  Nonexistent would be better than way downThumbs Up

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