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Let's talk about PRESSURING the ski - Page 3

post #61 of 67
One of the ladies in my L2 last year did this for a teaching demo and passed. I liked it a lot smile.gif

zenny
post #62 of 67
We do not want to create pressure. We aim to efficiently use our inertia and gravity via the ski's edge and allow pressure to appear and gradually bend the skis as much as needed, when needed.

This is done via stiffening and then relaxing the muscles of the outside leg at the right time, as the skis were put on edge the right amount and the body aligned properly, in preparation.

Eh?
Edited by razie - 11/5/14 at 8:05pm
post #63 of 67

Well Razie, at a minimum you can change the distribution of pressure.  Pick one foot up (for example).  Move the CoM forward or aft. 

 

I'd also argue you can increase or decrease pressure.  Flex or extend...

 

Mike

post #64 of 67
For sure, we can do... The question is what we should do...

Instead of extending, I like to think of it as stiffening the muscles (and in reality is not just the leg, but the core as well) - it sends less of a message that one should push into the ski: you can activate the muscles to resist the turn even as you're flexing, it's all a matter of timing and how much.

I think the outside leg is extended some time before max pressure, so it's not really the extension, but a separate decision and mechanism to create/increase the centripetal force and bend the ski to max.
Edited by razie - 11/5/14 at 8:16pm
post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post

For sure, we can do... The question is what we should do...

Instead of extending, I like to think of it as stiffening the muscles (and in reality is not just the leg, but the core as well) - it sends less of a message that one should push into the ski: you can activate the muscles to resist the turn even as you're flexing, it's all a matter of timing and how much.

I think the outside leg is extended some time before max pressure, so it's not really the extension, but a separate decision and mechanism to create/increase the centripetal force and bend the ski to max.

I agree.   Once you understand and develop the mindset that creating and maintaining a centripetal (circular) condition is key, then you look at the mechanics in a different light.

post #66 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post

totally agree YM and LF!  That is how I teach never evers to turn, but with less emphasis on actually lifting the ski and more on tipping it flat while lightening it.  LF, just curious why do you start with backwards first?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

I think TheRusty mentioned it once here on Epic.  I've done it a few times with never-evers.  More often I've worked it into beginner lessons as a supplemental thing when they are trying to get their first turns working.  I don't use it every time.  My lessons are short, so I don't have time to do anything that doesn't produce results immediately.  Skiing backwards sometimes fits the bill.  For some reason, when they are going down backwards they tend to do the shortening more strongly than when they are heading down frontways.  It serves as a WOW lightbulb moment.  Herringbone up, slide down backwards towards my voice; don't turn around and look; just go straight backwards with both legs evenly weighted; shorten one leg (or bend one knee) and see what happens.  It works great with British teenagers on school trips.  

Oh wait.  The first time I encountered this was in my first Level II Skiing exam, which I failed.  On the last day, after we had finished the skiing tasks, our examiner took us down a green trail and had us do this backwards wedge.  When we had all experienced the flex-to-release backwards, he announced "Now that's how you need to start your turns if you want to pass your Level II Skiing."  His implication at that moment was that we had all failed.  

One of my beginner lesson procedures has for many years been to herringbone up a gradual rise and slide back down backwards, using the wedged skis to control speed. I usually suggest narrowing and widening the backward wedge. Then we climb back up and turn around to use the wedge going forward. Next time I use this, we're going to climb up a third time and slide backward with lightening pressure on one foot.
post #67 of 67
Thread Starter 

These climb-up-glide-down first exercises are critical in that first day ever lesson.  I try to get them turning left and right and coasting to a stop (facing forward) before we go over to the real bunny slope.  We don't have a magic carpet for beginner adults, so the climbing can wear them out if I have them do it too many times.  For every climb up, they need to have a new breakthrough on the way down that strengthens their newbie turns without scaring them silly.  Otherwise I tire them out before they even get to experience real gravity with a view down the hill.  

 

Maybe I'll try the backwards single turns more often this year.  Kneale, let me know how yours work out!  

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