or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beaver Creek First Week of Jan - Page 2

post #31 of 44


Those skyways are not steep, but as Nathan mentioned, they are narrow and there are drop offs onto runs which can look like cliffs ;)   The most difficult part of them, however, is the skating to keep going on the flats.  If you don't keep some speed up, and beginners rarely can or do keep their speed up, you'll have to skate which is work - beginners don't skate the best just like they don't ski the best.   When you are on those things you need to keep an eye uphill and don't get creamed by any yahoos bombing across them.  And that's what the slow areas are all about, BTW - they don't want people straightening through those areas at a zillion miles an hour through all the beginners.  That's where the beginning lessons will be happening.

 

Take her cues for what she's ready to do.  Give her some greens if she needs it.  The advice to lead when you are together is solid.  Traffic nearby tends to make beginners nervous.  I started late in life and in the beginning I was afraid I'd turn in front of someone and get run over.  Later I was afraid someone would turn in front of me and I wouldn't react quickly enough and I'd run somebody over.  Personally it was a big breakthrough for me when I reached the point where I'd look for holes developing in the traffic and let the skis go and drop through.  Once I stopped worrying about traffic things started to go much better for me.  Lead away from traffic, try the sunny side of the runs where the snow might be a little softer and the light better.  Pick spots down the slope and tell her that's where you guys are going and you'll wait there for her.  Play "stay in my tracks" and little games like that.  Pick a short steep and play "do this in three (or two or four or whatever) turns".   The Beav has a ton of small groups of trees that you can plan to stop in front of, or behind or whatever.  Don't tell he what she needs to do but, rather, mention things that helped you, particularly, IMHO, what something felt like rather than the mechanics of it.  And whatever you do, DON'T LAUGH AT HER!  ;)

 

You're gonna have a great time!  

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

I didn't mean to imply that Grouse has groomers or that I was comparing groomers. I meant to communicate that I may be mistaken in my impression that Beaver Creek has little in the way of challenging terrain compared to Breck. It may be that I simply know Breck better than Beaver Creek.

 

Monique, you need to spend some more time at the Beav.  The bump runs on Birds of Prey are the real deal and better than any bump terrain at Breck -- steep, long and big bumps.  The Beav, however, has no bowl skiing and there's just a lot more terrain at Breck than at BC.

 

Mike

 

Tangential ... I've only ever skied one day at BC. We had no guide and unsurprisingly wasted a little time doing stuff we weren't thrilled by. Anyway, it was an awesome day in almost every respect once we finally got by all the military checkpoints that appear to be designed to keep the hoi-polloi (us) as far away from the actual base as possible. Specifically I remember taking what I thought was one of the most fun bump runs I've ever been on. Looking at the map now, I think it must have been Ripsaw. Mike? Yes? Anyway, the magic thing about it is that it starts off really easy with some nice islands and little contours. Super confidence-building, bring a grin kind of bumps. But it goes on. And as it goes on it gets steeper ... very ... very gradually. By the last bit it's really quite demanding. I had to concentrate pretty hard - in a good way. But there was no hesitation or fear factor because all the pitch gets introduced just as you're ready for it, and not before. Would love to ski that again. The gorgeous Colorado sun, so anemic in Maine in January, did not hurt, of course. :)

post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Yes, she does seem to be more comfortable when I go ahead. I learned the hard way that I shouldn't have attempted to teach her. Thankfully, her uncle, a family friend and someone who we went on family ski trips with every year as I grew up is a part time ski instructor. How one of his only 2 nieces didn't first ski until her mid 20s is beyond me. Haha. Once he was able to spend day a day with her she started to progress. She has really progressed quickly IMO for the limited skiing she has done. Thankfully, she is very receptive to my tips at this point. Though being more aggressive in her turns and stops is really the only comment I typically make.
post #34 of 44
Splendido is sublime.
And for a unique experience, try Beano's Cabin.
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

 

I didn't mean to imply that Grouse has groomers or that I was comparing groomers. I meant to communicate that I may be mistaken in my impression that Beaver Creek has little in the way of challenging terrain compared to Breck. It may be that I simply know Breck better than Beaver Creek.
Monique, you need to spend some more time at the Beav.  The bump runs on Birds of Prey are the real deal and better than any bump terrain at Breck -- steep, long and big bumps.  The Beav, however, has no bowl skiing and there's just a lot more terrain at Breck than at BC.

Mike

Tangential ... I've only ever skied one day at BC. We had no guide and unsurprisingly wasted a little time doing stuff we weren't thrilled by. Anyway, it was an awesome day in almost every respect once we finally got by all the military checkpoints that appear to be designed to keep the hoi-polloi (us) as far away from the actual base as possible. Specifically I remember taking what I thought was one of the most fun bump runs I've ever been on. Looking at the map now, I think it must have been Ripsaw. Mike? Yes? Anyway, the magic thing about it is that it starts off really easy with some nice islands and little contours. Super confidence-building, bring a grin kind of bumps. But it goes on. And as it goes on it gets steeper ... very ... very gradually. By the last bit it's really quite demanding. I had to concentrate pretty hard - in a good way. But there was no hesitation or fear factor because all the pitch gets introduced just as you're ready for it, and not before. Would love to ski that again. The gorgeous Colorado sun, so anemic in Maine in January, did not hurt, of course. smile.gif

Ripsaw and its friends in Rose Bowl are super fun. I haven't been back there since the lift was replaced with a faster one. I find them a little - one note? But I agree they can be challenging, especially Cataract which just goes on and on. I guess I need to figure out what I mean by challenging. Maybe it's just that I prefer trees and bowls to bumps. Bumps don't feel steep to me because there are so many different surfaces and angles? You never really have to be skiing on the steep part, not for long.

Apparently by challenging I mean something more akin to "scary" than "exhausting."
post #36 of 44
Thread Starter 

I think she might be alright on the skiway if it isn't that steep.  But I can definitely see the freakout.  However, like you said, we will only be able to ski the limited greens on Bachelor and Arrowhead.  Hopefully by day two we will be able to hit up all of those blues.  If that's the case, I will probably be content with 3 days at Beaver Creek.  We will definitely be taking the shuttle over and spending the vast majority of day 1 at the top of Beaver Creek (that is, when done with the lesson).  Flat terrain could be her weakest part of skiing at this point, so I'm hoping to avoid as many catwalk type trails as possible.  Like you said Knucklehead, when she stops worrying so much about the traffic and skiing with confidence, I think her enjoyment will skyrocket.  It really did once she stopped physically stressing so much on the way down.  Once she started making the turns more effortlessly and letting the skis do more of the work, and her thighs weren't burning from a MI green, she started to see the real enjoyment of skiing.  I feel like she has a couple more of those a-ha moments ahead, hopefully soon.  Good tips on how to approach some things with her.  I can always use those, as I could be more patient generally speaking and don't remember much of being at her level (I was 6). 

post #37 of 44
I have always wanted to ski stone creek chutes, how hard is it? It sucks the trees are so thick you can't see down the run to check it out. I would also like to do min turn mile but should prob go with someone who has done that before.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by billy94z View Post

I have always wanted to ski stone creek chutes, how hard is it? It sucks the trees are so thick you can't see down the run to check it out. I would also like to do min turn mile but should prob go with someone who has done that before.

 

How about... fun steep but not scary steep?   Stone Creek chutes  are a blast.  Other than some cliffs there is nothing scary back there, but take a buddy with you for sure.   They used to feel more gnar when they were out of bounds.

 

Minturn mile (at Vail) is more of an experience than good skiing beyond the first few turns just out the gate.  Good fun, though, on the right day with the right crowd.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
I guess I need to figure out what I mean by challenging. Maybe it's just that I prefer trees and bowls to bumps. Bumps don't feel steep to me because there are so many different surfaces and angles? You never really have to be skiing on the steep part, not for long.

Apparently by challenging I mean something more akin to "scary" than "exhausting."

 

WADR, if a bump run is not scary enough for you... you need to ski faster!  :)

 

Grouse Mountain has some of the steepest, longest bump runs in Colorado.   The great thing is the prototypical Beav clientele has no interest in runs like that, so the snow stays nice longer than most areas anywhere near Denver.

post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Streak View Post

And for a unique experience, try Beano's Cabin.

 

Yes, Beano's!

 

My two favorite restaurants are Beano's and Blue Moose Pizza, the most expensive and least expensive at the Beav.   If you go to them both, it averages out.  Thumbs Up

 

And... if the OP is thinking of popping the question, Beano's is the place.  (not the Blue Moose :))

post #40 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

Tangential ... I've only ever skied one day at BC. We had no guide and unsurprisingly wasted a little time doing stuff we weren't thrilled by. Anyway, it was an awesome day in almost every respect once we finally got by all the military checkpoints that appear to be designed to keep the hoi-polloi (us) as far away from the actual base as possible. Specifically I remember taking what I thought was one of the most fun bump runs I've ever been on. Looking at the map now, I think it must have been Ripsaw. Mike? Yes? Anyway, the magic thing about it is that it starts off really easy with some nice islands and little contours. Super confidence-building, bring a grin kind of bumps. But it goes on. And as it goes on it gets steeper ... very ... very gradually. By the last bit it's really quite demanding. I had to concentrate pretty hard - in a good way. But there was no hesitation or fear factor because all the pitch gets introduced just as you're ready for it, and not before. Would love to ski that again. The gorgeous Colorado sun, so anemic in Maine in January, did not hurt, of course. :)


Q

 

Ripsaw is a great run into Rose Bowl.  And it does get steeper.  But the real stuff is on the other side of the mountain, Peregrine, Goshawk and Kestrel on Birds of Prey.  Then you have some other shorter and less steep stuff off of Grouse, like Bald Eagle, Osprey, and Falcon Park.

 

A fun thing to do is the Talons Challenge.  It's all of the Black and Double Black runs off of Birds of Prey, Grouse, and Larkspur lifts in one day.  You can do it with a ski instructor or they have a one day open event.  About 24k vert of bumps.  It wears you out.

 

Mike

post #41 of 44
If I'm not mistaken there is a clip of Vince skiing Ripsaw at about the two minute point of this video he put together from our visit to Beaver Creek in 2012. May be a few shots of Goshawk in this video too. ...and some lame old guy skiing groomers too:-)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV9FaZ6SD_U
post #42 of 44

Spent about 10 days at BC in Feb 14 with my GF who is not a risk taker;) All the easy runs are up the top and to get back down its either the incredibly boring Cinch run  or the relatively steep blues so most days she downloaded on the Centennial.  

 

I'm an intermediate, not keen on bumps but dont mind steep, Check the daily grooming reports, blacks like double diamond are a piece of cake when freshly groomed, even golden eagle is not that bad if you can hold an edge! I skied some of the other ungroomed  double blacks ok but only mornings after fresh snow. On the other hand I found the blue tree runs quite challenging and the black ones terrifying! I guess it shows what a bad tree skier I am;(

 

We also did Vail, Keystone and Breck, her favorite was Keystone but I'm dead keen to spend more time in the back bowls at Vail on a day with some visibility!

post #43 of 44

I think it's a big positive she wants a lesson the first day.  You should maybe start with the tour and then look for some challenging sectors above her ability range when you're own your own.  Stay away from her class while in progress but show up before the end of it so the 3 of you can chat about what she's doing and where is appropriate for her to be skiing (you might ask the instructor about Vail as well as Beaver Creek) the next day. 

 

If I were based in Beaver Creek for 4 days I would be skiing Vail one or two of them but not driving the extra distance into Summit County.

post #44 of 44
Thread Starter 
We will definitely be doing Beano's, Blue Moose, and Grouse Mountain Grill since it's in our hotel. How about Vail? We will be eating at least one night there. What's everyone's favorite place to eat there?

She is very excited to take a lesson. We are thinking she is going to take an intermediate lesson. It says moving from green to blue runs. Does anyone know how much time they would spend on the greens before going to the blues? I would think they progress to the blues. Do they spend the morning on greens maybe? If she was able to do blue runs there from day one, that would obviously be awesome.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel