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Setting up new E100s

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hi gang.  I'm the proud owner of a new pair of Rossi E100 (182).  I'm mounting them with STH2 16s, for what I think will be a very sweet ride.  I'm super excited!!

 

Anyway, I want to put a 3 degree side edge on them and wanted to run my plan by the pros to get their insights (I haven't set up a new pair of skis in about 5 years and am probably a bit out of practice).  Here are some observations and my plan:

 

1) The E100 has angled sidewalls, so I don't think I need to remove any material.  Does this sound right, or should I pull out my trusty sidewall plainer (i.e., a sharp wood chisel, followed by a few grades of sandpaper -- hey, it works!);

 

2) With note (1) in mind, my first move is to put a panzer file in a 3 degree edge tool and set the edge. 

 

3) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way through 100, 400, and 600 diamond files.

 

4) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way though 600, 800, and 1600 ceramic stones.

 

5) As for the topsheet, I'm not sure what material it is, so I don't know whether I can smooth it out at the tips and tails like I would a GS ski.  Does anyone know whether I can take a file to it???

 

6) Wax, wax, wax. 

 

7) Wax a bit more.

 

8) I don't have any tools for the base (I don't even have a true-bar any more).  Any advice on what I should do about the base (edge and structure).  I'll send these to a shop to mount the bindings: should I have them check the base bevel, should I have them put structure in the base and re-set at 1 degree?  What would you guys/gals do if these were yours?

 

Thanks a bunch for the advice!!

post #2 of 8
If you trust your shop get them to do the base and the side edge to 3 while the bindings are getting mounted. Ski 'em and then maintain them yourself. If they end up pooching it, you can fix it yourself but I guess if you trust the shop to do your mount and base, likely you can trust them to do a good job on everything else to get you started.

Jealous, the season is still a fair way off here in the East.
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbuquerqueDan View Post
 

Hi gang.  I'm the proud owner of a new pair of Rossi E100 (182).  I'm mounting them with STH2 16s, for what I think will be a very sweet ride.  I'm super excited!!

 

Anyway, I want to put a 3 degree side edge on them and wanted to run my plan by the pros to get their insights (I haven't set up a new pair of skis in about 5 years and am probably a bit out of practice).  Here are some observations and my plan:

 

1) The E100 has angled sidewalls, so I don't think I need to remove any material.  Does this sound right, or should I pull out my trusty sidewall plainer (i.e., a sharp wood chisel, followed by a few grades of sandpaper -- hey, it works!);

 

2) With note (1) in mind, my first move is to put a panzer file in a 3 degree edge tool and set the edge. 

 

3) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way through 100, 400, and 600 diamond files.

 

4) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way though 600, 800, and 1600 ceramic stones.

 

5) As for the topsheet, I'm not sure what material it is, so I don't know whether I can smooth it out at the tips and tails like I would a GS ski.  Does anyone know whether I can take a file to it???

 

6) Wax, wax, wax. 

 

7) Wax a bit more.

 

8) I don't have any tools for the base (I don't even have a true-bar any more).  Any advice on what I should do about the base (edge and structure).  I'll send these to a shop to mount the bindings: should I have them check the base bevel, should I have them put structure in the base and re-set at 1 degree?  What would you guys/gals do if these were yours?

 

Thanks a bunch for the advice!!

No reason to touch the base edge without skiing on them first. Although you may want to check with a true bar and see that the base edge is consistent and no more than 1 degree and that the bases are flat (at least 10-12mm in from each edge)  a bit of concavity in the center is fine, 

 

Then this is what I would do as follows on the side edge: 

 

Step 8 – setting the side edge angle – Most folks are running a 3 degree side edge angle today for all skis;  I like to make 1 or 2 passes with a 5 to 7 degree angle using a cross (panzer) file along the whole length of the edge; this allows the top corner of the steel to blend nicely with the sidewall. Next, begin sharpening your side edges using the cross (panzer) file at 1 degree more than you intend to run – use a 4 degree if you intend to finish with a 3. When you have a sharp ski from tip to tail, move to a mid or small sized file with the final angle you want (3 degree) and continue sharpening. The process of finishing the side edge is designed to continually smooth out the previous work, leaving you with a nice smooth, grippy edge. I like to make a few passes with a middle grit diamond file next, of course attached to the file guide.  (and of course you can add aprogressiion of diamond stone grits here if you'd like) This will really soften the rough effect that the file has left .  Now you are ready to really put the edge on – use your Arkansas or ceramic stone with your file guide, and begin working the side edge steel back and forth until it is extremely smooth and sharp.

At this point in a new ski prep, I will take an Arkansas or ceramic stone and lightly pass it along the base edge to cut the “curl” of steel that has developed from all this filing. I usually do this freehand, with light to medium pressure.  (**Crucial step in the process**)

An extremely light pass with NO pressure on the edge point with your gummi block will finish the edge off, and you should have a very sharp, smooth edge that is ready to ski.

 

 

I don't think you need to use so many diamond stones I would use a 200, a 400 and 600 and stop there. 100 is really coarse and I only use it for smoothing out really bad nicks in the side edge. 


Edited by Atomicman - 10/30/14 at 6:41pm
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 


That's great, AtomicMan.  I have a 4 degree beveler, so I'll start with that and then set my edge with the 3.  I use the 100 grit diamond stone because I don't think my bastard file is as sharp as it could be, so I almost use the stone as a substitute -- it takes off a surprising amount of material.  Don't worry about that hanging burr, I'll get it off!!  I'll have the shop test the bases and work on them if they're out of wack.

 

Now we just need some snow to start falling around here so I can hit Wolf Creek on Thanksgiving!

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbuquerqueDan View Post
 


That's great, AtomicMan.  I have a 4 degree beveler, so I'll start with that and then set my edge with the 3.  I use the 100 grit diamond stone because I don't think my bastard file is as sharp as it could be, so I almost use the stone as a substitute -- it takes off a surprising amount of material.  Don't worry about that hanging burr, I'll get it off!!  I'll have the shop test the bases and work on them if they're out of wack.

 

Now we just need some snow to start falling around here so I can hit Wolf Creek on Thanksgiving!

Thanks AD, and by the way that was written by Dave Peszek who used to be the tech guy for Holmenkol. 

 

I have edited it slightly and changed the order a bit.   (I Iike the hanging burr removal and final gummi pass to be the last 2 steps) otherwise word for word!

 

By the way I use a hard blue gummi and I do use a a short Panzer to start. Artech ski has a fairly inexpensive 7 degree side edge beveler and that may work better for you with the angled sidewalls than a side wall planer!

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Well, I don't have anything larger than the 4 degree, so I made a little modification: a bit of duct tape around the top to make a greater angle...

I made a quick pass with this set-up, which took off a bit of sidewall close to the edge and nice long ribbons of edge.  I'm about to run though your (Holmenkol's) steps. 

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbuquerqueDan View Post
 

Hi gang.  I'm the proud owner of a new pair of Rossi E100 (182).  I'm mounting them with STH2 16s, for what I think will be a very sweet ride.  I'm super excited!!

 

Anyway, I want to put a 3 degree side edge on them and wanted to run my plan by the pros to get their insights (I haven't set up a new pair of skis in about 5 years and am probably a bit out of practice).  Here are some observations and my plan:

 

1) The E100 has angled sidewalls, so I don't think I need to remove any material.  Does this sound right, or should I pull out my trusty sidewall plainer (i.e., a sharp wood chisel, followed by a few grades of sandpaper -- hey, it works!);   Plane the sidewalls out if the gate. This is step one.   Get a Plane BEAST or some other planer.  Don't do it with a wood chisel.  Plane BEAST uses a small section of a panzar file.

 

2) With note (1) in mind, my first move is to put a panzer file in a 3 degree edge tool and set the edge.   I would save the panzar for sidewall shaping and or sidewall planing.

 

3) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way through 100, 400, and 600 diamond files.  Good.

 

4) With the same 3 degree tool, work my way though 600, 800, and 1600 ceramic stones. Good

 

5) As for the topsheet, I'm not sure what material it is, so I don't know whether I can smooth it out at the tips and tails like I would a GS ski.  Does anyone know whether I can take a file to it???   Very good.  This is your second step after sidewall planing.  If it is a cap-ski skip this step.  Shaping is for sandwich skis.  Some sandwich skis will be somewhat shaped already, some not at all.

 

6) Wax, wax, wax.  Yes, plus scrape and brush each time.  Use base preparation waxes each time.  Progress from softest to hardest.

 

7) Wax a bit more.  You can't wax too much as long as you don't overheat.  Maybe start working some low fluoros at this point.

 

8) I don't have any tools for the base (I don't even have a true-bar any more).  Any advice on what I should do about the base (edge and structure).  I'll send these to a shop to mount the bindings: should I have them check the base bevel, should I have them put structure in the base and re-set at 1 degree?  What would you guys/gals do if these were yours?  Get a base bevel guide tool and do it yourself.  Bevel until you hit the base just a tinny bit.  You can see this happen with your eyes.  No need to get them "checked" for that.

 

Thanks a bunch for the advice!!

Just my two cents of advice for you.   Good luck!

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlbuquerqueDan View Post
 

Well, I don't have anything larger than the 4 degree, so I made a little modification: a bit of duct tape around the top to make a greater angle...

I made a quick pass with this set-up, which took off a bit of sidewall close to the edge and nice long ribbons of edge.  I'm about to run though your (Holmenkol's) steps. 

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