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What Hirscher said i.e Crossfit

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

……“CrossFit showed me a total new way of training for range of motion in all those workouts. I’m fighting against tired legs, which is so normal when you do CrossFit, so it changed my whole way of standing on my feet. It was a good decision,”………

 

That ought to rock the boat a bit.

post #2 of 5

:popcorn

post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by loboskis View Post
 

:popcorn

This pretty much sums it up.  The discussion is endless.  

 

If my workout routine allows me to be fit enough to ski multiple days, that is a positive affirmation of my choice.  From what I have seen, Crossfit would probably do that for me.  I don't see any reason to argue against it.  I like a little more isolated leg strength exercises. That helps me to maintain top end strength for handling greater G-forces in a turn.   There is probably more specific training for skiing that would be better.  Do what the pros do if your body can handle it.  The main distinctions between me and the pros, is age, time available and the amount of skiing I actually do.  I just have to make the most of what's available to me.  

 

At the end of the day, I take inventory of my limiting factors and make adjustments accordingly.  I can predict my top 2 before I even hit the slopes.  1.  Cardiovascular acclimation to elevation.  Not much to do for that but more hard exertion at elevation (6000 ft +).  Mt biking at high elevations is good prior to the snow fall.  But it doesn't last until the resorts open.  2.  Prolonged foot speed.  I get blown out of the moguls after 6 turns.  More lateral plyometric speed drills usually pays off.

 

Bottom line:  For a recreational skier, do what gives you the highest grin factor on the slopes and don't be overly concerned about public affirmations.

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonazm View Post
 

This pretty much sums it up.  The discussion is endless.  

 

If my workout routine allows me to be fit enough to ski multiple days, that is a positive affirmation of my choice.  From what I have seen, Crossfit would probably do that for me.  I don't see any reason to argue against it.  I like a little more isolated leg strength exercises. That helps me to maintain top end strength for handling greater G-forces in a turn.   There is probably more specific training for skiing that would be better.  Do what the pros do if your body can handle it.  The main distinctions between me and the pros, is age, time available and the amount of skiing I actually do.  I just have to make the most of what's available to me.  

 

At the end of the day, I take inventory of my limiting factors and make adjustments accordingly.  I can predict my top 2 before I even hit the slopes.  1.  Cardiovascular acclimation to elevation.  Not much to do for that but more hard exertion at elevation (6000 ft +).  Mt biking at high elevations is good prior to the snow fall.  But it doesn't last until the resorts open.  2.  Prolonged foot speed.  I get blown out of the moguls after 6 turns.  More lateral plyometric speed drills usually pays off.

 

Bottom line:  For a recreational skier, do what gives you the highest grin factor on the slopes and don't be overly concerned about public affirmations.


Practical and nicely said

post #5 of 5

I have a funny feeling I got sucked in by this one (newbie).  Is there a good workout that can improve my sucker prevention fitness?

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