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Instructors: your favorite first-timer bump progressions - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
 

Rusty you hit a major conundrum smack between the eyes in your second sentence.  That is,  handling customers that arrive at line up to learn bumps and you can tell by just looking at how they stand on their skis, that bumps ain't in their near future and that $25 or so they just spent should be directed to the goals of your sentence.  

I'm lucky in that we have to travel to get to the bumps so we have time to try some quick fixes. If that does not work and the guest still wants to get their butt kicked, I have a few cheat tricks that can aid survival and our nasty bump run always has an escape route. I take more students to terrain over their heads than many top notch instructors because I have a silly belief that I can manage the risk (which is hard work), I've yet to get burned for doing this and I keep getting good results. The conundrum starts to disappear when you can see these students as opportunities instead of challenges. My goal is to get to "wow" in every lesson (note - this is a stretch goal). It helps if you believe that there's always a "wow" out there to be had. A wow does not have to require delivering on unrealistic expectations. I've been known to tap into my evil side to get results when facing unrealistic expectations.

post #32 of 34
Thread Starter 
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

I don't have a set progression for first time bumpers. I need to see good stance and balance and an ability to make a short radius turn before we start bumping. 

Rusty you hit a major conundrum smack between the eyes in your second sentence.  That is,  handling customers that arrive at line up to learn bumps and you can tell by just looking at how they stand on their skis, that bumps ain't in their near future and that $25 or so they just spent should be directed to the goals of your sentence.  

 

Seems like this is the perfect time to keep the client happy and have them traverse in a countered stance across the bump field absorbing the bumps, plant the pole and make one turn, then traverse across in the opposite direction, repeat.  Have them narrow the traverse as comfort develops.

 

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
....
Regarding traversing bump fields: I like to follow the alley initially, doing a garland uphill at the base of each bump we cross. I also like to emphasize the importance of pressing the tips down the back side of the bumps we're "absorbing" during the traverses.

 

Turning this traverse into garlands (for additional speed control?) is a great idea, as is keeping the tips on the snow.    

post #33 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
 

Rusty you hit a major conundrum smack between the eyes in your second sentence.  That is,  handling customers that arrive at line up to learn bumps and you can tell by just looking at how they stand on their skis, that bumps ain't in their near future and that $25 or so they just spent should be directed to the goals of your sentence.  

I'm lucky in that we have to travel to get to the bumps so we have time to try some quick fixes. If that does not work and the guest still wants to get their butt kicked, I have a few cheat tricks that can aid survival and our nasty bump run always has an escape route. I take more students to terrain over their heads than many top notch instructors because I have a silly belief that I can manage the risk (which is hard work), I've yet to get burned for doing this and I keep getting good results. The conundrum starts to disappear when you can see these students as opportunities instead of challenges. My goal is to get to "wow" in every lesson (note - this is a stretch goal). It helps if you believe that there's always a "wow" out there to be had. A wow does not have to require delivering on unrealistic expectations. I've been known to tap into my evil side to get results when facing unrealistic expectations.

 

Teaser.  Details, please!  I'm taking notes.  

post #34 of 34

Way too much to give many details. The absorption traverse is the old standby, but a traverse that hits the valleys "alley" that minimizes absorption is better for severe cases. Dialing the speed and the angles way down, going one bump at a time, setting the path and setting the DIRT dial way low are key elements of any cheat. Most back seat skiers can manage an edge set that can be used to do something to control speed. A pivot, skid and edge set technique can be used to get down a zipperish line on an easy bump run. For kids, I may choose an absorption traverse line, but have them jump the bumps instead of absorb them. You have to read your audience and the conditions du jour before deciding what to do.

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