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My Better Half's First Season -- Keep me from mucking it up. [A Beginner Zone thread] - Page 2

post #31 of 56
If your wife really likes it, next year she could do unlimited lesson pass at Breck or Keystone.
post #32 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

 

Just to confirm, you will be skiing in Colorado?  Obviously suggestions about how to help a beginner in terms of technique and gear purchases are not that location specific, but someone who lives in ski country has a lot more options than someone in the flatlands who is flying with a novice for a ski trip.

 

Mod note: added "Beginner" to thread title.  Beginner Zone threads are carefully moderated.

 

Yep. Primarily at Loveland because of they're great first timer deal with the 3 class pass. And that I fell for the place last year (terrain + lack of crowds + proximity + snow quality + vibe.) We'll also have a ski weekend at Crested Butte with friends. A just-us getaway to Monarch. Both of which are included free (3 days) in our passes. 

 

I hope to also take her to Winter Park for a day (I've got a 4-pack there) and Copper for a day to see if she would prefer the RMSP next year if she's into the whole thing. 

post #33 of 56

1: She will develop at the pace she wants to, you might want her to improve faster but pushing is not going to be positive 

2: Forget about your skiing initially. If she is not in a lesson, having her wait somewhere while you get a few freshies in won't endear you. Waiting anxiously the bottom of a slope for her to catch up is worse. Never use the expression "just follow me".

3: If she enjoys it but it's clear your never going to be at a similar level take trips with others so she will have someone at the same level to ski with..

4: Doubling your costs could halve your skiing. While it's nice to have the partner along there is a lot to be said for separate vacations.

post #34 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

If your wife really likes it, next year she could do unlimited lesson pass at Breck or Keystone.

 

I'm pretty sure that's limited to level 5 and up. Is that reasonable after a season? (DH says he thinks it's 6 and up, but I thought 5.)

post #35 of 56
Quote:

Originally Posted by jmeb View Post

 

Yep. Primarily at Loveland because of they're great first timer deal with the 3 class pass. And that I fell for the place last year (terrain + lack of crowds + proximity + snow quality + vibe.) We'll also have a ski weekend at Crested Butte with friends. A just-us getaway to Monarch. Both of which are included free (3 days) in our passes. 

 

I hope to also take her to Winter Park for a day (I've got a 4-pack there) and Copper for a day to see if she would prefer the RMSP next year if she's into the whole thing. 

 

For the trip with friends, what's the ability level in the group?  Will she have people to ski with for at least half a day?  Doesn't mean they are also beginners, more than that are willing to take it easy and keep a beginner company for a few runs.  Does someone in the group know Crested Butte well?  If so, I suggest you get some advice about where to take a group of mixed ability.

 

For Monarch, plan to ski with her for a while but also go ski a few runs without her.  Ideally by then she'll be interested in skiing some greens or blues on her own.  It can take be more relaxing for a beginner to ski at their own pace without feeling like they are holding up others, especially an SO.  But obviously, you know your relationship a lot better than anyone on the Internet.

 

Even when cell phones work on a mountain, always good to have a back up plan for meeting up at lunch and end of the day.  Meaning when and exactly where.  Do not plan to meet "at the car" but rather pick a place that is reasonable to hang out for a while.  In some cases, doesn't hurt to have two meeting times somewhere on the slopes.  For instance, could say 2:30 or 3:30 with the agreement that there is no need to wait more than five minutes for the first meeting time.

post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

If your wife really likes it, next year she could do unlimited lesson pass at Breck or Keystone.

 

I'm pretty sure that's limited to level 5 and up. Is that reasonable after a season? (DH says he thinks it's 6 and up, but I thought 5.)


That makes getting to Level 5 a good goal.  Based on what that meant in a kids' ski school, I don't see any reason an athletic woman who skis 15+ days in Colorado can't get to that level.  Especially one who will start with a series of lessons.

post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

If your wife really likes it, next year she could do unlimited lesson pass at Breck or Keystone.

 

I'm pretty sure that's limited to level 5 and up. Is that reasonable after a season? (DH says he thinks it's 6 and up, but I thought 5.)


That makes getting to Level 5 a good goal.  Based on what that meant in a kids' ski school, I don't see any reason an athletic woman who skis 15+ days in Colorado can't get to that level.  Especially one who will start with a series of lessons.

 

According to Keystone, it's the first level of intermediate. This does seem reasonable.

 

http://www.keystoneresort.com/ski-and-snowboard/ski-and-ride-school/whats-my-ability.aspx#/Intermediate

 

Quote:
 Description: You ski or ride comfortably and confidently on all “green circle” and most groomed “blue square” terrain at Keystone. You can link turns (mostly parallel for skiers) of varying sizes and you can control your speed in most situations by adjusting your line, with little need for braking (“gliding the slow line fast”).

What to expect—depending on your needs and goals:
- Explore higher speeds and more vigorous movements for shorter, complete turns.
- Develop higher edge angles and discover the control and sensations of carved turns.
- Gain confidence on steeper, more challenging groomed blue terrain.
- Venture into easiest ungroomed terrain.
- Skiers learn to incorporate pole use for better timing and precision.
post #38 of 56

However - OP prefers skiing Loveland due to vibe and lack of crowds. Keystone and Breck are the opposite of that.

 

Unless OP wants to join those of us who do the upper level lesson pass to skip the lift lines, ski with a group of people of similar ability, and get guided to the stashes. Oh also learn stuff!

post #39 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by noncrazycanuck View Post
 

1: She will develop at the pace she wants to, you might want her to improve faster but pushing is not going to be positive 

2: Forget about your skiing initially. If she is not in a lesson, having her wait somewhere while you get a few freshies in won't endear you. Waiting anxiously the bottom of a slope for her to catch up is worse. Never use the expression "just follow me".

3: If she enjoys it but it's clear your never going to be at a similar level take trips with others so she will have someone at the same level to ski with..

4: Doubling your costs could halve your skiing. While it's nice to have the partner along there is a lot to be said for separate vacations.

 

1. Yes.

2. Yes. Besides, I have tons of thing I need to work on at a slow pace. One-ski skiing, skiing switch, etc etc. 

3. Yep, already lining some up.

4. She's understanding of me running off alone sometimes. She often takes trips I'm not invited on. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

For the trip with friends, what's the ability level in the group?  Will she have people to ski with for at least half a day?  Doesn't mean they are also beginners, more than that are willing to take it easy and keep a beginner company for a few runs.  Does someone in the group know Crested Butte well?  If so, I suggest you get some advice about where to take a group of mixed ability.

 

For Monarch, plan to ski with her for a while but also go ski a few runs without her.  Ideally by then she'll be interested in skiing some greens or blues on her own.  It can take be more relaxing for a beginner to ski at their own pace without feeling like they are holding up others, especially an SO.  But obviously, you know your relationship a lot better than anyone on the Internet.

 

Even when cell phones work on a mountain, always good to have a back up plan for meeting up at lunch and end of the day.  Meaning when and exactly where.  Do not plan to meet "at the car" but rather pick a place that is reasonable to hang out for a while.  In some cases, doesn't hurt to have two meeting times somewhere on the slopes.  For instance, could say 2:30 or 3:30 with the agreement that there is no need to wait more than five minutes for the first meeting time.

 

1. Very mixed. Aggressive, young, smart, ski patroller down to very cautious wives/girl friends. We'll both be covered. And have a couple along with us whose skied there a great deal.

 

2. That was the plan at Monarch. I'd love to hike some turns back in Mirkwood if conditions are safe enough to do so sans partner. 

 

3. Roger that. I was considering picking up some 2-way radios for communication at the base etc. I need a set for touring with my patrol buddy anyhow. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

However - OP prefers skiing Loveland due to vibe and lack of crowds. Keystone and Breck are the opposite of that.

 

Unless OP wants to join those of us who do the upper level lesson pass to skip the lift lines, ski with a group of people of similar ability, and get guided to the stashes. Oh also learn stuff!

 

OP would like that. However I'm not sure I love the idea of fighting crowds to/fro/there. With Gazex exploders going in over Berthoud next year I'm keen on making Mary Jane / WP our home base. Maybe even with a shared condo down in Fraser. 

 

Wonderful advice all. Lots to think about to make this a great first season. 

post #40 of 56

We have some 2-way radios. They're great, but bulky, and they won't necessarily work from a back side run to a front side ... just depends on the angles. Kinda depends on if you get good cell coverage at your mountain (we don't at A-Basin, but do at Breck). My husband got an FCC license to have access to the "better" frequencies (or something ... honestly I didn't pay that much attention. technically I should have the license, too). The only thing we've used them for in the last few years is communicating while blowing out the sprinklers or routing cables through the wall =/

 

I wish you the best. I haven't had much luck getting my husband excited about sports that I've acquired, nor has he had much luck with me; fortunately, we both live to ski in the winter, so we have that.

post #41 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
  •  
  • Boots: After first three lessons explore boots. I took her to try a few pairs on and she is adamant she needs a size that I'm sure is much too big (28 for her Womens size 10 foot?!). 

 Oh dear, that is so way too big, I don't know what to say!  A 26.5 should be just fine, especially for first purchase, but somehow you have to keep it no bigger than 27 in the rental. I'm a 9.5 in a 24.5; that's a little aggressive, obviously, but a 9.5 is not far from a 10. ...

 

I think there is a thread on SkiDiva that lists shoe vs boot size ... ok here it is, have her look through that and maybe it will be persuasive.

 

I'm a size 10 and I'm pretty sure I'm in a 26.5, properly fitted, etc. Now I'm questioning myself and will try to remember to check tonight. Regardless, it's a properly fit boot and I'm snug as a bug in it. (Well, I was until I packed out the liners severely - but that's "lift the toe" room, not "fore/aft" room. 28 is nuts.

 

I checked. I was wrong. I'm in a 25.5 - so right in line with what everyone else has been saying.

post #42 of 56

Qcanoe once took a picture of his boots lying on the floor next to his sneakers.  They were the same length on the outside.

I went upstairs to check mine.  Same thing.

 

Use that as a double-check if you like to see if you're in the right size boots.  Easy to do, and it doesn't require remembering numbers :o.

post #43 of 56
Jmeb's SO here. Thanks to all for the advice. However, I do think I'm being somewhat misrepresented here. My street shoe size is something more like 10.5-11. I agree that 28s are too big. Jmeb is exaggerating due to the fact that I tried on a particular pair of 26.5s, and I thought my toes are actually supposed to be in front of the rest of my foot, not underneath, yes? I'm a rock climber, I can handle a tight shoe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post

Oh fer Criminy sake.  Back off ,Gloria Steinem.  I am NOT patronizing,  This is the WOOing stage of learning/loving to ski.  It must be wine and roses before it is freezing rain, boilerplate, and brown bags.  

EVEN athletic women from Minnesota like to look pretty, have fun, and feel cared for.

If you want to be egalitarian, try this.  

Pull the blankets off the bed at 4:30am and get a cup of gas station joe.  Black.  
Make her buy gas..  
Make sure her boots hurt.  Best to leave them in the car overnight.   
Tap your foot while she gets dressed.  Mutter.  Tell her she is fat.  
Ditch her the first chance you get. Stick her in a big group lesson with a teenage dude instructor.
Ignore the frantic calls/texts from ski patrol.  
Meet her at the bar at 4:05. Compliment her air cast. Hit on some other babe.
Take her for a burger.  Get hammered.  
Rinse and repeat.  

Now THAT is what independent, enlightened, Minnesota gals really go for.  Shows that you respect 'em.

wink.gif

I do actually appreciate most of your advice, particularly about not waking up at the ass crack of dawn. But keep in mind that the quantity of X chromosomes I possess does not dictate how much I like shopping and looking pretty. Last year I went snowshoeing in -55 degree windchill. I know how to stay warm. And as far as fashionable outerwear, jmeb is the one sitting in the corner deciding if he needs purple or camo snow pants... I'm just going to wear the gray ones I got at the REI scratch and dent sale a few years ago.
post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmebsgirl View Post

Jmeb's SO here. Thanks to all for the advice. However, I do think I'm being somewhat misrepresented here. My street shoe size is something more like 10.5-11. I agree that 28s are too big. Jmeb is exaggerating due to the fact that I tried on a particular pair of 26.5s, and I thought my toes are actually supposed to be in front of the rest of my foot, not underneath, yes? I'm a rock climber, I can handle a tight shoe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pat View Post

Oh fer Criminy sake.  Back off ,Gloria Steinem.  I am NOT patronizing,  This is the WOOing stage of learning/loving to ski.  It must be wine and roses before it is freezing rain, boilerplate, and brown bags.  

EVEN athletic women from Minnesota like to look pretty, have fun, and feel cared for.

If you want to be egalitarian, try this.  

Pull the blankets off the bed at 4:30am and get a cup of gas station joe.  Black.  
Make her buy gas..  
Make sure her boots hurt.  Best to leave them in the car overnight.   
Tap your foot while she gets dressed.  Mutter.  Tell her she is fat.  
Ditch her the first chance you get. Stick her in a big group lesson with a teenage dude instructor.
Ignore the frantic calls/texts from ski patrol.  
Meet her at the bar at 4:05. Compliment her air cast. Hit on some other babe.
Take her for a burger.  Get hammered.  
Rinse and repeat.  

Now THAT is what independent, enlightened, Minnesota gals really go for.  Shows that you respect 'em.

wink.gif

I do actually appreciate most of your advice, particularly about not waking up at the ass crack of dawn. But keep in mind that the quantity of X chromosomes I possess does not dictate how much I like shopping and looking pretty. Last year I went snowshoeing in -55 degree windchill. I know how to stay warm. And as far as fashionable outerwear, jmeb is the one sitting in the corner deciding if he needs purple or camo snow pants... I'm just going to wear the gray ones I got at the REI scratch and dent sale a few years ago.

Welcome! It is such a nice change to actually get to meet the person being described in one of these posts!

post #45 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmebsgirl View Post

I do actually appreciate most of your advice, particularly about not waking up at the ass crack of dawn. But keep in mind that the quantity of X chromosomes I possess does not dictate how much I like shopping and looking pretty. Last year I went snowshoeing in -55 degree windchill. I know how to stay warm. And as far as fashionable outerwear, jmeb is the one sitting in the corner deciding if he needs purple or camo snow pants... I'm just going to wear the gray ones I got at the REI scratch and dent sale a few years ago.

 

When you're learning to ski, the snow quality a few hours later doesn't make much difference - but the number of people in the lift line is always much smaller at the very start of the day.

 

Assuming you get hooked like the rest of us did, you'll probably gravitate toward early mornings for your own reasons. My husband and I quickly got sick of being stuck in the I-70 parking lot, and for me at least after witnessing a few actual accidents, I figured it was a matter of "not if but when" in those conditions. So we used to leave Longmont at something crazy like 5 or 6 am to be in the A-Basin parking lot's first row. We'd laze around and eat breakfast, ski till 1, then done.

 

That does wear after a while. We're passionate enough about skiing that we now rent a condo so that we can drive up Friday night, drive back late Sunday after the traffic subsides. Or late Monday if the powder gods are sharing their gifts ... 

post #46 of 56

@jmebsgirl , Welcome!  

 

I still stand by getting a bootfitter to work with you on getting the right boots for your over all foot shape.  It will help tremendously with your long term comfort. 

Looking forward to seeing you around. 

post #47 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmebsgirl View Post

Jmeb's SO here. Thanks to all for the advice. However, I do think I'm being somewhat misrepresented here. My street shoe size is something more like 10.5-11. I agree that 28s are too big. Jmeb is exaggerating due to the fact that I tried on a particular pair of 26.5s, and I thought my toes are actually supposed to be in front of the rest of my foot, not underneath, yes? I'm a rock climber, I can handle a tight shoe.

Welcome to EpicSki!  Something tells me that you won't have any trouble enjoying time on snow this season.  I'm an advanced skier because I'm a ski nut.  Use rock climbing indoors as a fun way to stay in shape (only up to about 5.7).  I know what you mean about tight shoes.  The nice part about getting properly fitted boots is that they are only a little tight for a few days while the liner packs down a bit.  Does help to at least get an aftermarket footbed.

 

Have you done much gymnastics, dance, roller blading, or ice skating?  If so, picking up skiing should be pretty straightforward with a few lessons.

 

Once you are comfortable with turns, ask an instructor about side slipping.  It's not usually taught to beginners these days.  But it's a very useful survival skill.  Sooner or later I can see you ending up somewhere that is steeper than expected.  Knowing how to side slip means having a safe way down, even it's only for 10-20 feet.

post #48 of 56
Thread Starter 

Sometimes that happens. My bad. I'm making up for it with pouring her an egg nog soon and buying her a season pass ;).

post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

@jmebsgirl
I still stand by getting a bootfitter to work with you on getting the right boots for your over all foot shape.  It will help tremendously with your long term comfort.

What about short-term comfort? As a beginner, the last thing (pun intended) I'd want is to be distracted by my miserable, painful feet while trying to control these clown shoes called skis. Do bootfitters take into account that a newbie might not last the 3 or 4 days it takes to break in boots if they're miserable the whole time?

Just curious about the Bootfitters' Code for new skiers.
post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post


What about short-term comfort? As a beginner, the last thing (pun intended) I'd want is to be distracted by my miserable, painful feet while trying to control these clown shoes called skis. Do bootfitters take into account that a newbie might not last the 3 or 4 days it takes to break in boots if they're miserable the whole time?

Just curious about the Bootfitters' Code for new skiers.


A good bootfitter will take everything into consideration. 

 

One of the things I see with new skiers at our shop is the "wrong" boot.  The new skier buys bargain boots that they tried on until they felt "comfy" in the store and ended up having hot spots or too much movement in the boot after skiing a day or two. 

 

A good bootfitter will address the lifestyle of the skier as well as the foot shape and volume to try and eliminate typical beginner issues. 

post #51 of 56

If I could do one thing differently, it would have been to get to a competent bootfitter sooner. Someone with an overflowing list of recommendations, not just the convenient place at the base of the mountain. I am 100% certain my poorly-fit boots - supposedly fit with custom everything - were the reason I ended up with a morton's neuroma and required surgery to remove a nerve. Nerves don't grow back.

 

You can slip in and out of climbing shoes. You're in ski boots all day,and they are made out of plastic - no give whatsoever if there's a pressure point. That can lead not just to discomfort and pain, but to damage.

 

These days I no longer get into the fetal position and cry as I pull off my ski boots. It's pretty awesome that they're so comfy my husband has to remind me to take them off before I get in the car.

post #52 of 56
As far as boots Sue Booker at Loveland is a good choice. She will explain why newbies require a different tyoe of boot than experts and racers. It is also beyond convenient considering you will be taking lessons there.
post #53 of 56
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

As far as boots Sue Booker at Loveland is a good choice. She will explain why newbies require a different tyoe of boot than experts and racers. It is also beyond convenient considering you will be taking lessons there.

 

Great beta -- thanks!

post #54 of 56

@jmeb: how did the 2014-15 season go?  Have a ski vacation for this season planned yet?

 

Quote: Post #1

Originally Posted by jmeb View Post

This thread will track my wins and losses as I try to share the love of skiing with my significant other (SO) during her first season.

SO Background:
  • Young (a bit less than 30)
  • In decent shape -- bit of climbing / hiking / yoga.
  • 5'9"
  • Previous ski experience:
  • - Two days in the Midwest.
  • - No lessons. Friends put her on the chairlift. Ended day two with a light knee sprain. I was not present / associated with this bad juju.
  • To note: Is from Minnesota and knows how to handle extreme cold. Experience winter camping and hiking.


The Plan:
  • Utilize Loveland's Three-Class Pass (Lesson + Season Pass Package)
  • - One Full Day Lesson (Rentals Included.)
  • - Two Half Day Lesson (Rentals Included for whole day.)
  • After 1/2 days lessons, ski with her at Loveland Valley in the afternoon (assuming she wants to ski still.)


Equipment:
  • Use the rentals during the first three lessons -- get a feel for what it should be like outside of my "expertise" and have a pair of short skis to begin on.
  • Boots: After first three lessons explore boots. I took her to try a few pairs on and she is adamant she needs a size that I'm sure is much too big (28 for her Womens size 10 foot?!). Hopefully a lesson or two and some more non-me expertise will find her a good fit.
  • Skis: Rossignol B2 Bandits in 158. Skis in very good shape, bought off a friend whose wife outgrew them (in skill). May have to remount them depending on final boot size.

Goal:
  • If she likes skiing -- get her confident enough to explore on her own over blue/green terrain. Hopefully in time by end of February ski trip to Crested Butte so I have lots of time to go follow a local friend through what I hear is very humbling terrain.
  •  
  •  


The big question for me is how to negotiate the time after those lessons? Point me to threads I should read? Tips / Tricks / Suggestions? Start budgeting for regular lessons throughout the year?

I fear the biggest regular hiccup is going to be my need to be at the mountain stupid early. She is not an early riser. I hate traffic and love having a coffee, reading, and booting up methodically still in time for first chair.
post #55 of 56
Thread Starter 
Whoa bump :)
 
On the whole, it was a positive experience and she will be skiing again this year. Lesson package was great. By the time we were skiing together she was linking turns down green runs. Things were going well until we went to Copper. After a few runs with her and my mother, she started getting very skiddish, having trouble turning etc. Not a fun day. Dumbass that I was I didn't even think to check her equipment. When loading her skis back up for the drive home a day later (she skipped skiing that day) I found she had somehow ripped 12" of edge about 1/2 - 1" out and had a core shot at the edge. I was pretty embarrassed that I hadn't picked up on it earlier. 
 
Remainder of the season she worked on rebuilding her confidence. Used some rental skis she did like while the shop at the hill tried to fix the edge. They said it was a losing game, but we got 2 more good days out of it before it showed signs of pulling again for a $15 job. They have now been retired to become shot skis. 
 
For reference, here she is (starting about 1:30, blue skis, white jacket): https://vimeo.com/126050829 .  She was cruising. We both still have lots of technique to work on ;).  Please excuse my video editing -- she had just gifted me a goPro for my birthday a few days earlier. What's important is how awesome the conditions were for our last day of the year. 
 
Plans for this year
  • New skis -- already acquired. Still a beginner-ish ski. A few cm longer than her previous pair. For Xmas or later in the season she may get another new pair
  • Boots. She swears that her current ones are comfortable and warm, but the shell fit is like...30mm? Maybe more? Maybe an Xmas gift if she wants some.
  • Another lesson pack + season pass. Again at Loveland. 
  • 2 couples trips: 1 to Crested Butte and 1 to Durango or Monarch (all on our pass.) 

 

Also very excited that our ski-gang this year includes 3 other couples/families all with female skiers of a similar level. She's much happier to push herself when its with other gals than with me. 

 

We also have an agreement that the ski van must be warmed, and her passenger seat bed made before she gets in. 

post #56 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post
 
Whoa bump :)
 
On the whole, it was a positive experience and she will be skiing again this year. Lesson package was great. By the time we were skiing together she was linking turns down green runs. Things were going well until we went to Copper. After a few runs with her and my mother, she started getting very skiddish, having trouble turning etc. Not a fun day. Dumbass that I was I didn't even think to check her equipment. When loading her skis back up for the drive home a day later (she skipped skiing that day) I found she had somehow ripped 12" of edge about 1/2 - 1" out and had a core shot at the edge. I was pretty embarrassed that I hadn't picked up on it earlier. 
 
Remainder of the season she worked on rebuilding her confidence. Used some rental skis she did like while the shop at the hill tried to fix the edge. They said it was a losing game, but we got 2 more good days out of it before it showed signs of pulling again for a $15 job. They have now been retired to become shot skis. 
 
For reference, here she is (starting about 1:30, blue skis, white jacket): https://vimeo.com/126050829 .  She was cruising. We both still have lots of technique to work on ;).  Please excuse my video editing -- she had just gifted me a goPro for my birthday a few days earlier. What's important is how awesome the conditions were for our last day of the year. 
 
Plans for this year
  • New skis -- already acquired. Still a beginner-ish ski. A few cm longer than her previous pair. For Xmas or later in the season she may get another new pair
  • Boots. She swears that her current ones are comfortable and warm, but the shell fit is like...30mm? Maybe more? Maybe an Xmas gift if she wants some.
  • Another lesson pack + season pass. Again at Loveland. 
  • 2 couples trips: 1 to Crested Butte and 1 to Durango or Monarch (all on our pass.) 

 

Also very excited that our ski-gang this year includes 3 other couples/families all with female skiers of a similar level. She's much happier to push herself when its with other gals than with me. 

 

We also have an agreement that the ski van must be warmed, and her passenger seat bed made before she gets in. 

Thanks for the update!  Other than wondering if her boots really fit, it sounds like a good start overall.

 

Can't imagine that much damage to a ski.  I was on a pair of demo skis with a bad tune at Alta and it was very strange.  Could barely make the skis turn at all.  Felt like I was going to end up in the trees at the side of a blue groomer.  The woman who had taken them before me had said something about the tune, but I had no idea how much difference it could make.

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