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Oregon Winter Predictions by Meteorologists

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 8

This is probably good news for me because I already spent too much money on equipment for me and my son.  I am already stressing out about how I can afford lift tickets.  It also reduces the risk of racking up more medical bills from emergency room visits.:)  It is good to have a back up sport to fall on.  For me, less snow means more of the mt bike trails will remain accessible and it costs less.  I have spent my money on randonee equipment so I wouldn't be so dependent on ski lifts.  I can still enjoy the outdoors and get a good workout.  For me, that means I can look forward to going into the spring ready for epic mt bike rides.

 

There was one year back around 2004 when the NW had a serious drought winter.  We made a spring break trip to Brundage, ID.  For some reason that specific resort got a lot of snow.  It got a huge dump right before we left.  We even had to drive through a snow storm.  The storm passed overnight.  It was the most awesome spring skiing I have ever experienced.  It was also the most memorable family trip we have had.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonazm View Post
 

This is probably good news for me because I already spent too much money on equipment for me and my son.  I am already stressing out about how I can afford lift tickets.  It also reduces the risk of racking up more medical bills from emergency room visits.:)  It is good to have a back up sport to fall on.  For me, less snow means more of the mt bike trails will remain accessible and it costs less.  I have spent my money on randonee equipment so I wouldn't be so dependent on ski lifts.  I can still enjoy the outdoors and get a good workout.  For me, that means I can look forward to going into the spring ready for epic mt bike rides.

 

There was one year back around 2004 when the NW had a serious drought winter.  We made a spring break trip to Brundage, ID.  For some reason that specific resort got a lot of snow.  It got a huge dump right before we left.  We even had to drive through a snow storm.  The storm passed overnight.  It was the most awesome spring skiing I have ever experienced.  It was also the most memorable family trip we have had.

It will be way too wet, muddy and cold for biking.

 

Sounds a lot like last year.  Trick was waiting for the big dumps in between the rain storms and jumping on it for a couple days of good skiing.

 

They are calling for less precipitation so maybe fewer season saving big dumps.

 

Waiting to get the video and transcript from the meteorologists winter prediction presentation at OMSI.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonazm View Post
 

This is probably good news for me because I already spent too much money on equipment for me and my son.  I am already stressing out about how I can afford lift tickets.  It also reduces the risk of racking up more medical bills from emergency room visits.:)  It is good to have a back up sport to fall on.  For me, less snow means more of the mt bike trails will remain accessible and it costs less.  I have spent my money on randonee equipment so I wouldn't be so dependent on ski lifts.  I can still enjoy the outdoors and get a good workout.  For me, that means I can look forward to going into the spring ready for epic mt bike rides.

 

There was one year back around 2004 when the NW had a serious drought winter.  We made a spring break trip to Brundage, ID.  For some reason that specific resort got a lot of snow.  It got a huge dump right before we left.  We even had to drive through a snow storm.  The storm passed overnight.  It was the most awesome spring skiing I have ever experienced.  It was also the most memorable family trip we have had.

It will be way too wet, muddy and cold for biking.

 

Sounds a lot like last year.  Trick was waiting for the big dumps in between the rain storms and jumping on it for a couple days of good skiing.

 

They are calling for less precipitation so maybe fewer season saving big dumps.

 

Waiting to get the video and transcript from the meteorologists winter prediction presentation at OMSI.

Eugene has a whole trail system that is almost specifically designed for wet, muddy winter riding.  Most of the trail work happens in the fall.  Riding in the mud really improves my bike handling skills.  It also builds up my muscle endurance for the spring.  It is good cross training for skiing.  I will admit I can only stand riding in the rain and cold for no more than 2 hours.

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonazm View Post
 

Eugene has a whole trail system that is almost specifically designed for wet, muddy winter riding. 

Eugene is 430 feet above see level, wet and muddy most of the year.  A bit different than riding rain washed ski trails on Hood at 6,000 feet if it's too warm for snow.  Risk of injury would be way higher on the bike on the steeps in the mud than skis on the snow at 6,000 feet in winter.  Cost too for that matter, bikes and gear cost about as much as skis and gear.

 

If like last year, just gotta be ready to take our shots when we get cold snaps and snow storms.  We ended up skiing into May last year and got in 30 days.

post #6 of 8

As a matter of appropriate trail etiquette, I wouldn't ride really saturated National Forrest trails.  That is why the WhyPass trail system was developed.

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonazm View Post
 

As a matter of appropriate trail etiquette, I wouldn't ride really saturated National Forrest trails.  That is why the WhyPass trail system was developed.


Were there any days last year you could not ride the WhyPass?

post #8 of 8

It would be a very rare situation for the BLM authorities to shut it down, with the exception of planned logging in a specific section.  I think there was only 1 low elevation snow storm last year that would have made it very difficult.  Icy access roads would be another problem.  High winds is the one environmental condition that is an absolute no go.  That is just a personal life safety issue.

 

The craziest mid-winter mtb ride I have ever had was on December 30th, year 200?.  It was a night ride on the North Fork River trail.  We had a really good early season snow fall.  However, really warm rains came in and practically melted everything.  The North Fork Willamette river was over 30+ feet higher than normal in some narrow sections.  On one small section the river came up over the trail.  When we rode through it, the water came up over our thighs and it wasn't even cold.  At that point, I decided that the potential of the river rising even higher was too great for my comfort.  I bailed out at the next bridge crossing. 

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