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Anyone use binding plates on fat skis?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I'm thinking about torque on the ankle.  

Seems like a binding plate might help reduce the torque when edging for hard-snow-groomer skiing.

post #2 of 8

All my fat skis (up to 130) have had riser plates on them (mostly home made).  If you in softer, 3-D snow it probably doesn't make too much difference, but on firmer snow I feel that it does.  Caveat: free-heel bindings, so I need all the torque I can get!

 

ps: never felt like it was straining my knees as some people seem to fear.

post #3 of 8
It does- thing the tall stack on a Duke, but you loose the pivoty capacity in tight spaces. I like my fats as low as possible.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Having the foot high up because of a binding lifter makes pivoting the ski more difficult?  

Really?  I'm not arguing, just haven't experienced this, and I'm not getting a mental picture of how that works.

I'd love an explanation.

 

I have 106s, but I don't get on them very much.  So I'm looking for others' wisdom here.

post #5 of 8

I had a demo binding with a slightly higher stack height on a pair of white Gotamas (~105mm waist), and they seemed to edge a little better than a flat mounted pair of Gotamas that I skied, but there are a lot of variables.  I like wider skis mounted lower, but a little rise won't kill anyone and might make them marginally easier to edge. Plenty of people out there running Sollyfit plates, etc that aren't flailing on the hill.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Having the foot high up because of a binding lifter makes pivoting the ski more difficult?  
Really?  I'm not arguing, just haven't experienced this, and I'm not getting a mental picture of how that works.
I'd love an explanation.

I have 106s, but I don't get on them very much.  So I'm looking for others' wisdom here.

As a racer type, I really struggled with learning how to ski fat skis. I chalked it up to technique for years and then someone enlighten me that it was due to the amount of lifters I was putting on the skis and the risers that I had on the soles of my boots. Combined with my relatively lightweight and small foot, it made pivoting the ski very difficult.

Basically any degree of left makes it easier to edge or tilt the ski up on edge. This is due to the fact that you're changing the moment arm of the ankle joint and it is really challenging to get pure pivoting motions out of the 3-D articulation. Any motion w a lift increases The tendency to roll the ski up on edge.

Once I went to all mountain boots without lifters and mounting my skis as flat as possible, I found that skiing 125 mm boards was a surfy dream.

For this very reason, mogul skiers love the Flexon with a very low heel and frequently use the FKS binding that is mounted directly to the ski. Have you ever seen a bump skier would lifters?

Does this help with the explanation?
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Very helpful.  I get it.  Thank you.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Very helpful.  I get it.  Thank you.

If you're used to having 5-8mm add on toe/heel lifters or running a clamp w a plate, it is an entirely different experience. The upside on being lower to the ski also increases the stability of the gear.... You will loose some on the capacity to rail, but I'm betting you have firm snow dedicated skis for that!
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