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Increasing medial rotation of the femur

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I've been aware for years that I have restricted medial rotation of my right femur, much less than my left. It's been the case for all my adult life and pictures of me as a child show it was present then. When I'm standing or lying my right leg externally rotates significantly. It's caused all sorts of alignment issues and I think it originates from tibial torsion but that's just my amateur diagnosis.

 

I've worked hard technically to compensate but I feel like I can't compensate any further and it will restrict my future improvement as I work towards my CSIA Level 3 this season unless I can increase my range of motion in this area.

 

I figure that if I work to stretch my lateral rotators and strengthen my medial rotators that logically this will help, though experience tells me things are usually more complex than logic suggests.

 

If anyone has any specific exercises or advice that might help I'd really appreciate it. I'm 57 and keep myself fit.

 

Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 4
If it is internal rotation you're lacking, lay on your back,r knee bent, foot on the floor, then with the left leg, push the right knee to the left. Hold for 5+ minutes a couple of times a day.
I had the same problem, and after a few months it improved significantly.
post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adie View Post
 

I've been aware for years that I have restricted medial rotation of my right femur, much less than my left. It's been the case for all my adult life and pictures of me as a child show it was present then. When I'm standing or lying my right leg externally rotates significantly. It's caused all sorts of alignment issues and I think it originates from tibial torsion but that's just my amateur diagnosis.

 

I've worked hard technically to compensate but I feel like I can't compensate any further and it will restrict my future improvement as I work towards my CSIA Level 3 this season unless I can increase my range of motion in this area.

 

I figure that if I work to stretch my lateral rotators and strengthen my medial rotators that logically this will help, though experience tells me things are usually more complex than logic suggests.

 

If anyone has any specific exercises or advice that might help I'd really appreciate it. I'm 57 and keep myself fit.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Look into Yin Yoga.  I started yoga this past spring.  That in itself has helped my joint ROM immensely.  Yin Yoga tends to have you in a pose and you hold it for 3-5 minutes. Similar to what rod9301 posted.  I have always had a similar issue.  Like most, I can do somethings better/easier  on one side than the other.  Since I started yoga, I can now have the rom on my right side that I have on my left side.  My left side became better too, so the might not ever match up, but I'm confident they'll get to a point that I'll need to find a different excuse.

 

Have you considered getting it professionally diagnosed?  I did a yoga work shop and they talk about the paths or trains in our body.  How you can go from you toes to your head without having to change trains.  I was surprised to see how much stretching my feet helped my upper body rotation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rod9301 View Post

If it is internal rotation you're lacking, lay on your back,r knee bent, foot on the floor, then with the left leg, push the right knee to the left. Hold for 5+ minutes a couple of times a day.
I had the same problem, and after a few months it improved significantly.

 

I do this very same thing on both sides.

post #4 of 4
Be careful with stretching with limited internal hip rotation, as it might be a bony limitation, in which case stretching it will cause damage to the joint. Generally there are three things that might be causing the range limitation: a structural limitation (bone doesn't stretch), capsular restriction (manual therapy plus stretching can help), or a muscular limitation (stretch and strengthen as you suggest ).

It turns out there is a lot of variety in the orientation of our hip joints.

Since it's been around forever, I'd guess it's structure, but being as this is an "I'd guess" via the internet from a trainer (as in not a doc, physio,AT, chiro), I'd strongly recommend going to a good pro from the list above for input as to the origin of the limitation.

You may also find this article about hips interesting. It's a summary of what I learned at a course given by a world renowned physical therapist about movement disorders of hips (and backs). http://elsbethvaino.com/2010/12/lessons-of-the-hip-and-spine-from-dr-shirley-sahrmann/

Elsbeth
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