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Keystone night skiing tickets available separately?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Keystone's website doesn't mention night-skiing-only lift tickets, and sort of makes it sound like night skiing is only available to full-day ticket-holders.  There are some reviews that mention buying Keystone night tickets on Liftopia, but those reviews are almost four years old now.  So does Keystone sell night-only tickets at the window, and/or are they usually available on Liftopia each season?

post #2 of 21

I'm 99.9% sure they don't sell a separate night lift ticket. I think your best bet is to buy one of their Keystone/A-Basin 4 day packs or something if you're trying to cut costs or won't be able to ski a full day. It's a steal of a deal if it works with your plans!

post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks macvangelist!  I may have to seriously consider that option.  I already have a Copper 4-pack and my current plan is to buy a Loveland 4-pack as well.  Loveland sounds like a place I'd really like to try, and the cool thing about their 4-pack (besides the fact that it's only $129!) is that the tickets are fully transferable.  I'll have eight days in the mountains, so my thinking is that I'll ski/ride four days at Copper (their tickets are not transferable), ski/ride a couple of days at Loveland, give myself a couple of rest days during the trip, and sell the two remaining LL tickets.  OR if I have enough stamina to ski/ride eight days in a row (which I seriously doubt), but just want to try some other resort, then I could still sell a couple of the LL tickets and go wherever else I want.  With this plan, I was just hoping to have the OPTION to buy a cheap night ticket at Keystone, in case I wanted to night-ski for 3-4 hours on one of my "rest" days".

 

Then again, having access to Keystone AND A-Basin, with the ability to night ski any of four days during the trip does sound awfully appealing.....   

post #4 of 21

It sounds like you've got a good idea of what the best options are now. Personally, I'd go with this:

 

http://www.snow.com/epic-pass/passes/keystone-four-pack.aspx

 

I could get flamed for this, but IMO, A-Basin = Loveland (or similar enough, at least). For not much more, you get 4 days to use however you want at Keystone and A-Basin. I'm pretty sure that you could ski at A-Basin during the day and then night ski at Keystone and it wouldn't use an additional day of your 4 day pass. You may want to verify that, but I'm almost positive. It makes it a pretty good value proposition! 

 

My group usually skis A-Basin on the last day of our trip, as we head back toward DIA. We pick the last flight out that day, check out of our lodging, pack the car up, and take Loveland Pass east, stop & ski at A-Basin until maybe 2pm, then head to Denver. It works out great and is so cheap it's hard to pass up!

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

Yeah it does sound like a great deal, especially with the night skiing option (which I've always enjoyed).  Dang, I just wish the tickets were transferable....

post #6 of 21

I agree with Macvangelist above.  The Epic Keystone/A-Basin 4 pack is probably the best bet.  I've skied there the last two seasons, but purchased a Copper season pass this year.  The one thing I really liked about Keystone is that if you skied there on a Sunday during the day (and if they have night skiing at that time) and expected a lot of traffic going home, just keep skiing into the evening until you either get tired or decide the traffic has died down.  If the weather is good and the pass is open, I usually drive over Loveland Pass instead of going through the tunnel since you are already partly there already.  If skiing A-Basin, almost always take Loveland Pass if it is open.  You get out of the potential traffic going to the tunnel.  There might be traffic after the tunnel, but you save quite a bit of time if there are backups.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Giles View Post
 

 I was just hoping to have the OPTION to buy a cheap night ticket at Keystone, in case I wanted to night-ski for 3-4 hours on one of my "rest" days".

 

 

Rather than subject yourself to the horrors of night skiing on a rest day, here's a better idea:  head to Loveland first thing in the morning and buy a "flex ticket" that allows you to ski any four hours.  Rip up the fresh corduroy, then go home at lunch and take a nap.  Way more fun than skiing scraped off runs in the dark and cold.

 

http://www.skiloveland.com/ticketsandpasses/lifttickets.aspx

post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by neustkg View Post
 

I agree with Macvangelist above.  The Epic Keystone/A-Basin 4 pack is probably the best bet.  I've skied there the last two seasons, but purchased a Copper season pass this year.  The one thing I really liked about Keystone is that if you skied there on a Sunday during the day (and if they have night skiing at that time) and expected a lot of traffic going home, just keep skiing into the evening until you either get tired or decide the traffic has died down.  If the weather is good and the pass is open, I usually drive over Loveland Pass instead of going through the tunnel since you are already partly there already.  If skiing A-Basin, almost always take Loveland Pass if it is open.  You get out of the potential traffic going to the tunnel.  There might be traffic after the tunnel, but you save quite a bit of time if there are backups.

 

Thanks for the tips neustkg!

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

 

Rather than subject yourself to the horrors of night skiing on a rest day...

 

Maybe there's something wrong with me, but I actually LIKE night skiing.  :o  At least if the weather's good (not TOO cold and/or windy) and the snow isn't TOO scraped off.

 

But your point is well taken and nice conditions for night skiing might not happen while I'm there.  And skiing just a few hours in the morning at LL, followed by a nice long afternoon nap, does sound like a great alternative!

post #10 of 21

I grew up night skiing at a very small (300 vertical feet) ski area SW of Philadelphia called Chadds Peak.  Very tiny ski area that sold 4 hour lift tickets and looking back, the price was actually very good for group and team rates (about $5 or so for that 4 hours in the 1970s).  It was only a half hour from home.  The skiing could get very nasty, but overall, it was fun.  Did some night skiing in the Poconos later at Blue Mountain, which was about 2 hours from where I worked.  It can be difficult, but if night skiing was included in the day ticket price, it was a good deal (like at Keystone).

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 

I spent about five days at Keystone back in January 2002 with my wife plus her brother and his wife.  I think we only night skied one night, but as I recall the runs were pretty well groomed and not icy or scraped off (the in-laws were brand spanking new beginners, so we pretty much stuck to the green runs).  We had great fun and I haven't night skied since, so I'd kind of like to try it again if I get the chance.  But it may have just been the novelty that I enjoyed and I probably wouldn't enjoy it so much in crappy conditions.  So I'll just have to see how the conditions are when I get there.

post #12 of 21

It's funny, I don't think I know any Colorado folks that night ski, ever really.  I'm sure someone will jump in and say they do... but I don't know any.  I think we are just spoiled and our version of scraped off and icy is still pretty good skiing for most visitors from out of state.  

 

It's the visibility that I hate even more than the snow conditions or the cold.  I don't even like skiing when it's cloudy because of the reduced visibility.  Skiing in the dark is nuts!  Oh the horror!

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

I think we are just spoiled and our version of scraped off and icy is still pretty good skiing for most visitors from out of state.  

 

 

 

Exactly!  ;)

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

It's the visibility that I hate even more than the snow conditions or the cold.  I don't even like skiing when it's cloudy because of the reduced visibility.  Skiing in the dark is nuts!  Oh the horror!

 

 

I don't remember having any problem with visibility (it was a beautiful clear night as I recall).  But then again my eyes were 12 years younger then, so I'm not sure it'll be as easy for me these days...

 

Anyway, being a lifelong Alabamian, I'm pretty unspoiled when it comes to snow.  I'm lucky if I get 4-5 days on snow each year (although this year is shaping up to be much better than usual), so I'm usually happy with just about anything.  Heck I'm even considering going up to North Carolina sometime in December or early January just to shake off the cobwebs before my Colorado trips, and I'll probably even night ski up there!  You probably can't even DREAM of icy scraped off conditions that bad in your worst nightmares.  :D 

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Giles View Post
 

I don't remember having any problem with visibility (it was a beautiful clear night as I recall).  But then again my eyes were 12 years younger then, so I'm not sure it'll be as easy for me these days...

 

Anyway, being a lifelong Alabamian, I'm pretty unspoiled when it comes to snow.  I'm lucky if I get 4-5 days on snow each year (although this year is shaping up to be much better than usual), so I'm usually happy with just about anything.  Heck I'm even considering going up to North Carolina sometime in December or early January just to shake off the cobwebs before my Colorado trips, and I'll probably even night ski up there!  You probably can't even DREAM of icy scraped off conditions that bad in your worst nightmares.  :D 

Night skiing is a great way to practice for those days when there's poor visibility for other reasons, like fog.  Usually the few trails that have lights out west aren't all that complicated.  Definitely beats skiing in the rain during the day.

 

In the southeast, night skiing is that best way to avoid lift lines when skiing on weekends.  The price of a night session is always a good deal too.  I gather that some places in the midwest stay open quite late, as in midnight or 1am on weekends. :rolleyes

post #15 of 21

I posted the same question last year regarding night skiing.  They sold night only tickets last year... and didn't advertise the price very well.  I think you could get them in a ski shop as well in the $50 ballpark.

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

In the southeast, night skiing is that best way to avoid lift lines when skiing on weekends.  The price of a night session is always a good deal too.

Yeah that's kind of what I was hoping for out west, but I guess the longer season with better conditions virtually all the time, just makes night skiing much less appealing out there.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post

I posted the same question last year regarding night skiing.  They sold night only tickets last year... and didn't advertise the price very well.  I think you could get them in a ski shop as well in the $50 ballpark.

Hmm... not sure why they would be so tight-lipped about it. You'd think if they didn't want to sell night tickets separately, then they simply wouldn't. But if they DO want to sell night tickets separately, it sure would make sense to let people know about it. rolleyes.gif
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Giles View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

In the southeast, night skiing is that best way to avoid lift lines when skiing on weekends.  The price of a night session is always a good deal too.

Yeah that's kind of what I was hoping for out west, but I guess the longer season with better conditions virtually all the time, just makes night skiing much less appealing out there.


I think it depends on the local situation.  Night skiing can have a market for folks who are working full-time or are going to school.

 

Mt. Rose and Steamboat experimented with night skiing in recent years.  Steamboat added hours for the 2014-15 season.

 

Brighton and the newly renamed Nordic Valley (was Wolf-something) in the Ogden Valley cater to locals, especially families and teens.  Night skiing is important for them.  Teens can take the bus up BCC to Brighton after school, so parents don't have to be involved at all.  PCMR has night skiing, but seems like it's mostly the terrain park that gets used under the lights.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Giles View Post

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

It's the visibility that I hate even more than the snow conditions or the cold.  I don't even like skiing when it's cloudy because of the reduced visibility.  Skiing in the dark is nuts!  Oh the horror!

 

 

I don't remember having any problem with visibility (it was a beautiful clear night as I recall).  But then again my eyes were 12 years younger then, so I'm not sure it'll be as easy for me these days...

 

 

It's just so much more fun skiing when you can see.   I'll regularly stand at the top of a run for a few minutes and wait for the sun to come out from behind the clouds.    I feel much more confident and aggressive with good light, which makes skiing a lot more fun.   

post #20 of 21

I agree on the visibility. I learned to ski in the Washington Cascades where many times the visibility was better for night skiing than in the day.

post #21 of 21
Around here night skiing is big, and for sure you can see really well at night. It can be a bit tricky at twilight but at full night vision is no issue.
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