or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Buying new ski, need advice [lives in Missouri, annual 1 week ski trip to Colorado]
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buying new ski, need advice [lives in Missouri, annual 1 week ski trip to Colorado]

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hello,
I am new to this forum so I am sorry if I am doing this wrong.
I live in Missouri so I only get to ski for about 1 week a year, but I have been doing that for about 18 years now.  
I am 22 years old, 5'10" and about 195lbs, I am a mildly aggressive skier. I can ski pretty much any difficulty that resorts have to offer, but I typically tree ski in search of the powder there.

In the past I have always rented skis, I bought my own boots last year (Nordica Ace of Spades) and I am looking into buying my own pair of skis.  I have done a lot of research and I think the skis that are best for me (and my budget) are the 182cm Salomon Rocker2 108s.  The big issue I am having is figuring out what type of bindings to get without breaking the bank.

Any help would be greatly appreciated,

Eric

post #2 of 24

Are you skiing *in* Missouri, or are you traveling to Colorado every year for a ski trip?  Colorado conditions do not equal Missouri conditions and the "ideal" choice of ski will vary wildly depending on that.

post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Sorry I did not clarify, yes I travel to Colorado every year. In the past I usually go early January, (including this coming trip) . But after that I will graduate college and should be able to go any time to find the best weather.

Thank you,

post #4 of 24

The Rocker2 108, while it is a good ski, it is not the ONE ski for you. Take a look at skis more in the upper 80mm to mid 90mm underfoot segment with a ski like the new Rocker2 100 being at the top end. 

 

Binding wise, most of the 12-13DIN bindings should cut to for you. If looking at the closeout bins, make sure the binding will come with a brake that will be wide enough for said ski to will could be forking out another $30-50 for a new brake which eats up any savings from going leftovers. 

post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thank you for your help.  I guess the 108's are kind of a stretch, in the hope of finding powder as opposed to realistically what I will be skiing on.
Do you think 182cm will be the right length for me? 

post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

If you guys think the 108 is too wide, maybe you could help me out with a 1 quiver ski that will still work well when I find the powder I am looking for.  Like I said earlier, I go all over the mountain but typically tree ski wherever I go. So I'd like a ski that can do well all over the mountain but still excel when I found that powder or get deeper into the trees.

Thank you in advance for your help,

post #7 of 24
IMO you should keep renting skis for your once a year trip. Then once you finish school, get a job, decide where your going to live. Then look into buying skis.

Come back to Phil at that time, he can help you out.

You may also check out skiessientials.com look at last years skis.
post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your help.  

At almost 100 dollars each time I go, it doesn't take much to come out even on buying your own pair. I felt like I could enhance my experience a lot by getting my own pair of nicer skis when compared to (what seems to be below avg quality) rentals.  Although I could be wrong being I have only experienced rentals.  

Maybe it would be a better idea for me to go this year and try to demo a few pairs or something?

Oh and I definitely planned on buying last year model skis to save money. 

post #9 of 24
Maybe rent demo skis each time. You'll possibly save on carrying them on the plane trip, can get the right boots and the right bootfitting, and rent the best ski for the conditions at that hill each day (assuming you don't sleep in).

Oops, didn't see you had boots. Hope they fit right.
post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 

Ive used my boots with no problems so I assume they fit right (I guess I could be wrong).
Renting Demos seems like it could be a good idea, does anyone have any tips for renting demos? That is something I know nothing about.

 

Thank you for your help.

post #11 of 24
As for demos, I usually rent at the mountain so if I hate them I just swap them. Usually, wherever you do it, they'll apply about three days of rental to a purchase, but frankly wait a year and buy them off season, it'll come out better.

As for boots, 80-90% of skiers have boots that are too big, especially if bought from a ski shop in a non-ski area, or at a box store, or over the internet. I bet if you ask here, some people have boots now that are three sizes smaller than their first pair, even if they are older and fatter and their feet have expanded over the years.
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

Ill look through some older discussions on the boot topic - thank you

 

With the demos, is there anything else I should be aware of? Maybe some type of insurance policy if I demo a brand new ski?

 

post #13 of 24
Well, they won't be brand new, they'll more than likely be this season's, but unless it's December, someone will have used them before you. I'd make a note of anything about them before you have the shop, but generally unless you are landing on sharp rocks from ten feet and trash the things, it won't be an issue. Maybe buy a good lock to send the light-fingered to your buddy's skis instead, so you have them to return at the end of the day. I could see that being a problem.
post #14 of 24

I've rented demos at four different western locations.  Just google "cheap ski rentals" and the area you will be skiing.  I've sometimes called to make sure they have the skis I want to demo. You can usually get them for about $35-40/day if you look around and reserve in advance, esp. if you have your own boots.   It's not really a way to do business forever -- unless you are really only skiing for one week a year in which case it doesn't make sense to buy skis -- but it does allow you to get a good feel for what's out there and what you like/don't like.

 

Don't just go to the rental department on the mountain; you'll get mediocre skis and no choice. Make sure you find a place that offers a demo package.

post #15 of 24
The place can be AT the mountain, without it being the normal (or "performance") crap. There are plenty of mountains with ski shops at the base where you can try multiple pair for one rental price without getting back in the car every time. They are usually associated with a store. I'd pay ten dollars more per day not to be stuck with something because it was too much of a hassle to swap them midday.
post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 

Sounds perfect, thank you for your help everyone. I will probably have more questions after my trip in early January, maybe I'll see you on the slopes!

Thank you again

post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 

I was thinking about all of this again and had one more question.

When doing this demo thing I should probably have some skis in mind that I want to demo going into it to maximize my small amount of time there.
That being said I could really use some recommendations on a few skis to try out. Again (although truly impossible) I am really looking for a 1 quiver ski for now, depending on where I end up in the future.  Information on my skiing style/preference/size are located at the top of this thread.  Something I didn't add is while I do weigh 195 I am very active in soccer and club ultimate for my school, so by no means overweight. 


Let me know if you have any more questions.
Thanks in advance,

post #18 of 24
I'm not going to recommend skis for you, not my expertise. But, before you get too committed to whatever skis are on that list, you might want to identify what resort you are skiing at, the shop that logistically makes the most sense to demo out of, whether there are multiple shops handy for this, and what they carry in their demo fleet. Otherwise, you're walking in and finding that they only carrying three of the ten skis that interest you. There are some brands like K2 and Volkl that they will all have, but a lot of brands like Kastle that would be iffy. If you are committed to one of the less pervasive brands and it's carried in a shop down the road a piece, you'll be committed for the day to it. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but something to plan for.
post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 

Good advice thank you.  This year I will be at Breckenridge, CO.  I figured I would work on here to find a list then start searching for shops that have what I need (I have until early january).

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by EJLBQ2 View Post

Ill look through some older discussions on the boot topic - thank you

With the demos, is there anything else I should be aware of? Maybe some type of insurance policy if I demo a brand new ski? 
The shops I've rented and demoed from offer an optional damage rider to the rental contract for a couple dollars. I almost always pay for it, mostly because they hold you liable for stolen skis, too.

I don't have any useful suggestions for skis, but go with a list in hand of skis you'd like to demo. I second on-mountain demos if only to be able to try different skis in the same (or similar) conditions. Contact all the shops at the mountain to make sure they carry the ski. Sometimes they'll hold one for you if you call first thing in the morning and get there promptly, and on a not-too-busy day they might hold more than one pair. Bring them a six pack at the end of your first demo day and they'll do all kinds of favors for you. biggrin.gif
post #21 of 24
That's a good point about trying in the same conditions. I like to use a route that covers a multitude of conditions, then each new ski is taken skiing that route on the same day. It helps you to know if the difference you feel is the ski or the snow. Of course, on some days conditions can change throughout the day due to weather or crowds, but it's an attempt to level the baseline.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hey guys I would still love some help on finding a few skis to demo.  I am really looking for a ski that does well enough on groomers and hard pack that I can still enjoy myself if it comes to that.  But, I would like the ski to excel when I am out in the trees or happen to hit that beloved powder day.  Again I cant afford more than a 1 ski quiver right now, mildly aggressive skier,22 years old, 5'10'', 195lbs, athletic build. Typically spend a little over a week a year skiing in Colorado.

 


I think I am answering all the questions let me know if I have missed anything thanks.

post #23 of 24
K2 AMP Rictor 90 xti
Nordica NRGY 100

Haven't been on either of them, but they seem to be skis that'll cover most situations. I'm on their cousins, but I have a quiver, as do many of us here. So I don't have a do-it-all ski these days, but most are do-most.

Time for everyone to argue with my recommendations for demoing.... (That's the way it works here. No final answers, just everyone naming their own skis..)
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

That's a good point about trying in the same conditions. I like to use a route that covers a multitude of conditions, then each new ski is taken skiing that route on the same day. It helps you to know if the difference you feel is the ski or the snow. Of course, on some days conditions can change throughout the day due to weather or crowds, but it's an attempt to level the baseline.

 

Demoing in the same conditions takes one of the variables out. this is good, the more variables removed, the better. Other variables...the tune, was the ski tuned similarly let alone about the same time? Do the skis have the same amount of days on them? Another variable, demo binding. Same bindings or different? Demo bindings vary greatly in performance, weight and efficiency. Most demo centers are not there to "demo" skis, they are glorified rental centers, i.e. these skis go out 5-7 times a week to people who want a better rental ski and most have no intention of buying, they just don't want to travel with them. At true "demo centers", the skis only go out 5-7  times a month and only to people who are considering that ski to purchase, the ski is tuned each time so when it goes out, the  skier gets to experience that ski at it's peak performance. Find a shop that does that and you will be able to make an educated decision based on the ski's merits. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Buying new ski, need advice [lives in Missouri, annual 1 week ski trip to Colorado]