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Ski Vise Base Clamp Width

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I am going to be getting a ski vise to start tuning my skis. I will be needing a bench to mount them to and do my work on, but the benches/tables the tuning companies sell are way over priced for a small little table, in my opinion. So I am going to build my own work bench. I haven't decided on a vise yet but I'm leaning more towards the Swix World Cup or the comparable Toko. My problem is nobody says how wide the base clamp opens(how thick of a table it will clamp to) so I know how thick I can make my bench. I emailed both Swix and Toko. I got nothing back from Toko and an email from Swix saying basically we don't answer emails even after we tell you to email questions. So does anybody know, from experience or other knowledge, how big these clamps are?
post #2 of 15
Toko World Cup Ski Vise New 2013 Redesigned Model

Central clamp is larger - 70mm long clamp pads.
Central clamp adjusts to accept skis from 40 mm to 85 mm (we measured it).
All metal construction.
It clamps to workbenches up to 2.25 thick.
Includes two spring-loaded tip and tail supports that adjust in height (from 5.5 to 6.75) and can pivot from 90 Degrees to 60 Degrees.
These supports feature independent clamps to grip skis for edge work.
Accepts the optional Nordic Ski Platforms (not included). Nordic platforms provide greater underski support for flexible nordic race ski tips and tails.
Includes two brake retainers.
- See more at: http://www.racewax.com/p-419-toko-world-cup-ski-vise.aspx#sthash.9UPHW8S8.dpuf


That's for skinnier skis, but presumably the one for wider skis from Toko is the same.
post #3 of 15

 

 

Here ya go!  Just overhang your topsheet  by say 3 1/4" or more (mine is exactly 3.25") past the framing and you'll be fine. This is solid as a rock and I have used the bench for 30 years as is!!

post #4 of 15
This is the SkiMan vise set. I think most of them handle around two inches or more.

2ca6c4a0_P1040988_stitch.jpeg
post #5 of 15
Jus a quick tip- dont over tighten the table clamp part of the vice. These are some of the broken loaners from our shop.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post





Here ya go!  Just overhang your topsheet  by say 3 1/4" or more (mine is exactly 3.25") past the framing and you'll be fine. This is solid as a rock and I have used the bench for 30 years as is!!

That's what I was wondering about, would I have to have an over hang or would they clamp to the surface and support together. I am somewhat OCD when it comes to DIY stuff and for some reason an over hanging top drives me nuts. Same with the lower leg supports/lower shelf I plan on putting on. Most people put the supports on the inside or outside of the legs, which bugs me and looks cheap IMO. I will be using 4x4 legs with the supports integrated into them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Jus a quick tip- dont over tighten the table clamp part of the vice. These are some of the broken loaners from our shop.

Good piece of info to have. I'm assuming those are plastic? Are there any decent priced metal ones?
post #7 of 15
I believe those are metal. I would have thought a drop to a cement floor more likely to be involved, but I guess over-tightening COULD do it. However, I think some other force would also need to be involved, like maybe it was stressed due to the tightening and then twacked somehow from the side. I don't have the hand strength to tighten something that much.
post #8 of 15
Ya they are cast aluminum. There's 7 more broken ones like it. Swix, toko, ski man, wintersteiger, holmenkol vices of this type are all made in same factory in Italy. I broke one myself from over tightening years ago. Could of been a bad production year, cause I haven't seen them brake lately.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

That's what I was wondering about, would I have to have an over hang or would they clamp to the surface and support together. I am somewhat OCD when it comes to DIY stuff and for some reason an over hanging top drives me nuts.

 

Don't forget to  leave some left/right adjustability -especially- if you're working with kids' skis or nordic ones.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chenzo View Post

Ya they are cast aluminum. There's 7 more broken ones like it. Swix, toko, ski man, wintersteiger, holmenkol vices of this type are all made in same factory in Italy. I broke one myself from over tightening years ago. Could of been a bad production year, cause I haven't seen them brake lately.

 

 

Do they all also have missing screw pads?  

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I believe those are metal. I would have thought a drop to a cement floor more likely to be involved, but I guess over-tightening COULD do it. However, I think some other force would also need to be involved, like maybe it was stressed due to the tightening and then twacked somehow from the side. I don't have the hand strength to tighten something that much.

 

Nah, doesn't need to be thwacked.    Notice that all of those are missing the little articulated pad at the top of the screw.      That creates an unfortunate chain of events, thus:  

When the pad is lost the clamp doesn't tighten uniformly but tends to go looser-tighter-looser-tighter as the screw deforms the grain of the wood above it.    

 

When that happens it's commonplace for the user to take plier handles or something similar and wrap the handles around the T just for "a little extra grip"

 

When that happens the rounded ball at the top of the screw that used to hold the articulated pad tends to walk along the wood, forward out of the jaws of the clamp.

The moment the top of the screw walks forward out of the jaws the upper part of the C has a bending-backward moment on it, which is bad because it was designed to be put in pure tension.    It's doomed, especially if the user is still using those plier handles to get a grip on the T.

 

Dunno if it's the photo or what, but the yellow one at least looks like it has 'walked' along the wood a bit.


Edited by cantunamunch - 10/14/14 at 8:35am
post #10 of 15
^^^ ya what he said.
Also, what happens is that the screw pad is stamped steel, and it deforms from too much pressure from the clamp screw. Thus the screw pad falls off and gets lost.

This generally happens when the vices are repeatedly installed/removed.

Keep in mind, these w/c model vices are still the best product for tuning.
post #11 of 15

You might want to make the top solid 2x lumber, rather that 2x framing with a plywood top sheet. Won't matter for just ski tuning but chances are you'll wind up doing other stuff on it and a nice solid bench is what you need for general pounding. Like when your binding doesn't quite touch the ski after you mount it (see neighboring thread) so you pound on it with a big hammer. If you do use a 2x top the vises will fit fine. 2x4's on edge plus plywood and you'll need to over hang the plywood. 

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
This is just a quickie drawing I made up. 4x4 legs, 1/2 inch plywood top with 3 inch overhang, and 2x4 top supports every foot. The cabinets would be lockable to store tools without neighbors(open underground parking) touching.
post #13 of 15

1/2" plywood top is too flimsy. Best bet is 2 layer of 3/4" MDF glued & screwed together (from the bottom, so the screws won't show). You can pound on that with a sledge.

 

If you are using framing lumber rather than cabinet grade hardwood. 4x4 dimensional lumbers are a pain to work with. Totally unstable - usually cut from heart wood of the tree.

2x4 legs are generally sufficient for the most benches. If you need something beefier - move on up to 2x6 will definitely increase the heft.

 

From a stability design stand point a lower cross rail is needed to keep the two front legs from spreading side way on each other. That will also give you a space that you can totally enclose under the bench. Unless you plan to use the bench with a office chair - sitting down on the job. :D       

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post


That's what I was wondering about, would I have to have an over hang or would they clamp to the surface and support together. I am somewhat OCD when it comes to DIY stuff and for some reason an over hanging top drives me nuts. Same with the lower leg supports/lower shelf I plan on putting on. Most people put the supports on the inside or outside of the legs, which bugs me and looks cheap IMO. I will be using 4x4 legs with the supports integrated into them.
Good piece of info to have. I'm assuming those are plastic? Are there any decent priced metal ones?

Pretty much gotta have an overhang. My is 5/8 ' Plywood and has I said has been there since 1984!

 

Solid as a rock with only a 3.25" overhang!

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post


That's what I was wondering about, would I have to have an over hang or would they clamp to the surface and support together. I am somewhat OCD when it comes to DIY stuff and for some reason an over hanging top drives me nuts. Same with the lower leg supports/lower shelf I plan on putting on. Most people put the supports on the inside or outside of the legs, which bugs me and looks cheap IMO. I will be using 4x4 legs with the supports integrated into them.
Good piece of info to have. I'm assuming those are plastic? Are there any decent priced metal ones?

They are metal

 

I have had mine for years, surprised on the breakage!

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