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Hey Ladies. Check this out. PLEASE - Page 2

post #31 of 37
Bob, thanks for posting that graphic again. Nowadays I'm always happy to identify with the top drawing, but now the others confuse me, because I've thought that the excessive forward lean of my old Rossi Electra whatevers was what put me firmly in the back seat and kept me from being able to stand comfortably (I tell ya, my quads were HUGE by the end of the season!). However, they were also too soft, and maybe there was ramp in the boot that confounded the whole equation. It kinda doesn't matter tho, because my guy and the Lange RS SCs he put me in are just grand, and what skills I had were suddenly more effective. biggrin.gif My best guess is that it's impossible to say what was wrong with the old setup without measuring my femur length and weight distribution, but as I said, the problem is moot.

One comment on rhetoric. It's far different to say that women's body types and geometry typically call for different ski design than men's or 'unisex' skis, than to say that the typical woman can't ski well on typical skis. It's the same thing, but one emphasizes a disability, as though women were a special case that needs to be adapted to, rather than the pent-up ability of athletic women who can shine on gear that's made for them--the way the vast majority of skis are still designed for men's physiology.

duck.gif
post #32 of 37

So...here's a question for you: 

 

If you could change the laws of physics--any way you want--what changes would you make (in the interest of skiing)? 

 

Not that this is on topic, or anything....

 

;-)

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #33 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by litterbug View Post

... I've thought that the excessive forward lean of my old Rossi Electra whatevers was what put me firmly in the back seat and kept me from being able to stand comfortably ...

 

Hi Litterbug--good question!

 

Excessive forward lean (bottom row in my diagram) increases the forward tilt of your shins (at least in snug, stiffer performance boots--loose, sloppy "rental" boots do not so strongly influence your leg angle, and setup is not as critical--but there are plenty of other problems!). Leaning the shins forward moves your knees forward, along with everything above them, unless you make some adjustments. So you bend your knees a bit more, which moves your hips back, and brings your center of mass back to center. That's the typical scenario, as shown in C1 in my diagram. Here it is again, since we've turned the page:

 

 

Those deeply-flexed knees put a lot of continuous stress on your quads just to hold you up, as you experienced. And the aft movement of your hips may give the appearance of being "in the back seat," and it may appear even moreso because the shoulders don't need to move forward either, but it is not necessarily so. Don't forget that, even when they comprise a proportionally large amount of your overall mass, your hips are not the same as your center of mass. As long as other parts compensate by moving forward--knees, torso, arms, and so on--your center of mass, and your balance point, can be considerably forward of your hips.

 

Unfortunately, this point is commonly misunderstood, even at high levels. I've heard far too many instructors claim that, "to keep it simple," they consider the hips and the center of mass as one. That could not be further from the truth. In fact, the center of mass will almost always be somewhat, if not significantly, forward of the hips, depending on the arrangement of your various body parts. This misconception alone causes untold errors, myths, and false conclusions about movement analysis, fore-aft pressure, and generally "what is right."

 

Best regards,

Bob

post #34 of 37

Very small but memorable example....

Check out the relative femur lengths. 

Note also that the knees of the two women point toward each other.

 

post #35 of 37
LF, That is a good example of the reasons that all skiers need to be fitted properly and some may need some alignment issues taken care of.  Keep in mind that, just because the two women's knees come together doesn't mean that they will need canting work or heel lifts.  A lot depends on how those angles translate to the ability to flex the boot, and the edge angles of the ski on the snow. 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

Very small but memorable example....

Check out the relative femur lengths. 

Note also that the knees of the two women point toward each other.

 

post #36 of 37

As @bounceswoosh touched on earlier in her post,  the concepts that are layed out in the OP, and the research done over the years regarding women's ski gear has made an impact on alignment for ALL skiers. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post
 

So...here's a question for you: 

 

If you could change the laws of physics--any way you want--what changes would you make (in the interest of skiing)? 

 

Not that this is on topic, or anything....

 

;-)

 

Best regards,

Bob

i've thought about this question and I'm not sure that I would want to change the laws of physics at all, but I'm glad we're addressing our approach to the laws of physics - in the interest of skiing. 

 

What would you change, if you could?  (besides the fact that you're due for new boots) :D 


Edited by Trekchick - 10/8/14 at 10:32am
post #37 of 37

Some related comments in a Ask Boot Guys thread:

http://www.epicski.com/t/129340/dalbello-freestyle-boots-for-women

 

The OP is asking about a few specific models that are marketed as for women.  Lou noted that " In fact many boots in women's sizes are indistinguishable from men's except in color just as most women's skis are the same as mens.  So I'd pay more attention to fit than to gender specific names."  CEM said "most of the market sector stuff is just high class BS, get a boot which fits your foot and is stiff /soft enough for your body weight and ability, the vast majority of boots are for use all over the mountain, my race boots are still on my feet on powder days as they are the best fitting boots i have."

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