or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Winter Park Elevation - Page 3

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post

Hmm.... now you got me thinking.  Sounds like the perfect way to prevent repeat house guests smile.gif

Looks like there is an even higher neighborhood near the top of Hoosier Pass.  People think Leadville is crazy high at 10,150ft.   Here's a house at 11,400ft for sale for $750K:
http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/82-Kimmes-Ln_Breckenridge_CO_80424_M19261-99087

I saw that house for sale....that's crazy! Look at the satellite image too, it's only like 200 ft below treeline.

I'm curious how windy it is there....I live year round at 10,100 and in an average winter we'll have consistent 20-30 mph gusts 4 to 5 days a week.

Not to mention snow drifts. At that elevation, the wind + snow that doesn't melt until may makes building snow fences an integral part of property maintenance.
post #62 of 87

Yeah I always wondered who was building those houses up there. It doesn't make a lot of sense to me, and they seem to be for sale quite often. I always sort of assumed neither builders nor sellers are local. I guess if you only go in summer, the snow isn't an issue, but the altitude! That's not an easy place to live, for anyone.

post #63 of 87
Houses like that tend to be vacation homes for the well-to-do rather than year-round residences, don't you think? It'd be a nice place to spend one week in August but year 'round would be challenging.
post #64 of 87
What's crazier is that it's not like one random house, it's an actual subdivision, maybe even with an HOA.

But hell, if the altitude were enough of a deterrent to drop prices into the 200-300k, range, I'd consider living there, only 25 minutes from Breck!
post #65 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

Houses like that tend to be vacation homes for the well-to-do rather than year-round residences, don't you think? It'd be a nice place to spend one week in August but year 'round would be challenging.

Well, not really, because few people can sleep much above 10K without issues. And it's a little bit remote, not really "well-to-do" land as far as I'm concerned. I suspect a lot of people buy up there and then realize it's not practical at all... but I don't know for sure.

post #66 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Well, not really, because few people can sleep much above 10K without issues. And it's a little bit remote, not really "well-to-do" land as far as I'm concerned. I suspect a lot of people buy up there and then realize it's not practical at all... but I don't know for sure.

Okay. I'm not familiar with the area in question.
post #67 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post

What's crazier is that it's not like one random house, it's an actual subdivision, maybe even with an HOA.

But hell, if the altitude were enough of a deterrent to drop prices into the 200-300k, range, I'd consider living there, only 25 minutes from Breck!

 

Yep, it's got to be one of the highest neighborhoods in CO.  Bunch of lots for sale, not too many houses built:

http://www.zillow.com/homes/2110116199_zpid/

 

I drove through the neighborhood maybe 5 years ago and it doesn't look like much has been built since.   Not cheap lots at $60K+, but cheap for how close it is to Breck.  

 

I couldn't do it.  Even August can be brutal up there.  I rode up there for the bike race in late August and it was 40 degrees and pouring rain at the top of the pass, while it was a reasonably nice day down in Breck.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/128679/2014-usa-pro-challenge#post_1758215

post #68 of 87

So... which med. is better for sleep: Tylenol or Diamox?  And if Diamox is the better choice, what are the typical side effects and how long do they last?  Are there other medications? I ask because my son always has something when we vacation in Colorado for skiing...flu-like symptoms sometimes, but, more often, the inability to sleep during the night. Anyone with some experience or recommendations on this not uncommon problem?

post #69 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michaelfahlund View Post

So... which med. is better for sleep: Tylenol or Diamox?  And if Diamox is the better choice, what are the typical side effects and how long do they last?  Are there other medications? I ask because my son always has something when we vacation in Colorado for skiing...flu-like symptoms sometimes, but, more often, the inability to sleep during the night. Anyone with some experience or recommendations on this not uncommon problem?


 



Definitely sounds like altitude issues with your son.

I just had a discussion with my pulmonologist about Diamox three weeks ago. He's the guy who's given me prescriptions in the past for Diamox that I used with good results on several trips to the Rockies. I can deal with tingly fingers and funny taste buds, but last winter I took Diamox when going to Colorado and had a reaction that I never experienced before. When turning my head I would get very cross-eyed. As long as I looked straight ahead I was ok. But cross-eyed at any time is not good when skiing or driving!!! I told this to the pulmonologist and he said, "let's try ibuprofen this time." In his opinion, "when the problem is minor altitude adjustment, whether something treats the effects or masks the effects, who cares?" So this year I will try ibuprofen.
post #70 of 87

Humidifier in the room when sleeping helps too. OP is spending night in Denver. was thinking he had to spend another night half way between. That seems like overdoing it.

 

Don't scare the guy about taking his toddler up there...

 

From the Babycare website on altitude answering a question about going to 10K feet:

 

Suzanne Dixon

pediatrician

Your baby will have the same tolerance for high altitudes as you do, provided that she has no special health concerns and is beyond 3 months of age.
(Babies under 3 months do not have mature enough lungs to handle the altitude stress, so wait until the baby has reached that milestone to take your trip.)

post #71 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

That's not an easy place to live, for anyone.

FWIW, roughly 40 million people live that high or higher, including a couple of cities of over a million (La Paz and Lhasa). 

post #72 of 87
Uh, yeah that's just what I meant. When any Sherpas move here, in fact, we take them right toward Hoosier Pass....
post #73 of 87
I had a guy from Tibet working for me for about a year. First time to Colorado and he said "Ooooh, we have some hills like that."

Lotta Northern European types don't do so well, though.

However, if somebody is going to have a really hard time at 9,000 ft that first night in Denver very likely won't be completely symptom free.
post #74 of 87
Comfort Suites right off I-70 at exit 252, Evergreen Prkwy. About 7000'.
post #75 of 87

You should be alright as long as your not running laps

post #76 of 87

When I was a college kid and came out West for the first time, I remember skiing down the hill just fine; but when we stopped and I had to walk from the ski rack to the lodge, even with no uphill, oh boy. Suddenly I was out of breath and rubbery.

 

Now that I live at Boulder/Denver altitude and spend a lot of weekends in the mountains, both winter and summer, the effect is much subtler. And I really notice the difference when e.g. I took a lesson where the other people were all visiting from NY. They were skiing just fine, but they couldn't go top to bottom all day. I think that was not fitness but altitude.

post #77 of 87

My family that comes from Texas and we just go up to Estes and they have to stop about every other 100 yds and it is from altitude so that is definitely true

post #78 of 87

You are doing all the right stuff.  Spending the night in Denver to acclimate is right on.  I teach skiing at Winter Park and frequently I get someone who doesn't even think about the elevation.  Unfortunately in a group lesson, it messes things up for them and the rest of the group.  In addition to you Denver overnight:

1. Drink plenty of water

2. Get plenty of sleep

3. Stock up on potassium - (bananas are a great source)

4. Watch the drinks at the mountain.  If you are from sea level, 1 drink is like two for most people. 

5. Relax and have FUN!

 

Cheers,

 

Parker

 ))

((

post #79 of 87

Thanks, James.  Right; who wants to risk a medication that might have some serious side effects, like cross-eyeness! Let me know how the Ibuprofen works.  I heard there is an alternative to both Diamox and Ibuprofen... but I can't remember what it's called.  I think it's another prescription med., however.

post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdtj View Post
 

You are doing all the right stuff.  Spending the night in Denver to acclimate is right on.  I teach skiing at Winter Park and frequently I get someone who doesn't even think about the elevation.  Unfortunately in a group lesson, it messes things up for them and the rest of the group.  In addition to you Denver overnight:

1. Drink plenty of water

2. Get plenty of sleep

3. Stock up on potassium - (bananas are a great source)

4. Watch the drinks at the mountain.  If you are from sea level, 1 drink is like two for most people. 

5. Relax and have FUN!

 

Cheers,

 

Parker

 ))

((

I have seen a lot of you guys talking about pills and stuff.  My wife is an herbalist and if you want to try a natural approach, Ginko is great for altitude, Melatonin or Valerian Root is great for a sleep aid - and never forget to stay hydrated...

post #81 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post

What's crazier is that it's not like one random house, it's an actual subdivision, maybe even with an HOA.

But hell, if the altitude were enough of a deterrent to drop prices into the 200-300k, range, I'd consider living there, only 25 minutes from Breck!

I have friends that live in Northstar. It's not that big a drop in land/building prices from stuff that's lower and closer to Breck. We looked at a couple places there before we purchased in Breck. Only the older, more basic houses (questionable construction and water/sewer arrangements, etc.) were lower in price.
post #82 of 87

Just out of curiosity, I looked at that house at 11,400 feet. Looked at VRBO where there are a bunch for vacation rentals. If the description didn't mention the elevation, it made me wonder how someone would react discovering for the first time that they're sleeping over 11,000 feet. That is pretty freaking high coming from sea level. A buddy of mine and i once stayed at the very top of Wildernest area in Silverthorne area in summit County, CO. It was about 10K I believe. Definitely was an issue for sleeping. Finally felt ok by the end of the trip.    

post #83 of 87
Thread Starter 
I'm still on the fence about which to go to first. The other reason behind doing winter park first is trying to avoid winter park on the weekend. The way our schedule works out we'd only have two full days at wp if we did steamboat first and didn't go to wp during a weekend.
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman View Post

I'm still on the fence about which to go to first. The other reason behind doing winter park first is trying to avoid winter park on the weekend. The way our schedule works out we'd only have two full days at wp if we did steamboat first and didn't go to wp during a weekend.


I wouldn't worry about it too much.  Go for WP first if that seems to work best for you.  The night in Denver should help with adjustment.  Since your whole trip will be completed a full week before Christmas the crowds should be very tolerable at both places even on weekends, especially if it is an average year for snow coverage allowing skier traffic to spread across numerous open runs.

post #85 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maui Steve View Post
 

Just out of curiosity, I looked at that house at 11,400 feet. Looked at VRBO where there are a bunch for vacation rentals. If the description didn't mention the elevation, it made me wonder how someone would react discovering for the first time that they're sleeping over 11,000 feet. That is pretty freaking high coming from sea level. A buddy of mine and i once stayed at the very top of Wildernest area in Silverthorne area in summit County, CO. It was about 10K I believe. Definitely was an issue for sleeping. Finally felt ok by the end of the trip.    

 

In 2009 we rented a huge house on the west side of Copper (near Lumberjack lift) for  a week for a wedding that was taking place at Copper.   We basically had the whole resort to ourselves for the week.

 

The house was listed at something like 10,200 feet and many people in our group were completely miserable for the first 2-3 days.   This is one of those houses that sleeps like 18 people and people came in at different times during the week.   The people that arrived days before others made sure the new arriving people didn't drink the first night and force fed them water.

 

My wife was as sick as anyone there unfortunately.

post #86 of 87

Drink plenty of water and listen to your body when you increase altitudes. Water is key to helping you acclimate. 

post #87 of 87

I had a few different visitors stay over at my house at 10,100 ft with varying results. My in-laws stayed in Denver the first night, idaho springs the next night (7500 ft), blackhawk the next night (~9,000 ft), and my house the next night. Both of them had headaches and had to go lower. 

 

My Dad and his GF came and stayed in Denver the first night, my house the second. My Dad was find, his GF had minor headache but nothing severe. 

 

Then I had my friend Eric visit from Boston. I picked him up at the airport, and drove him to my house the first day. He felt fine, and he even played a game of basketball against me with no problems. Slept fine, no headache the whole stay.

 

I worked out of the country for a year in 2012. When I came back to my house the first night, I did have a minor headache since I had lost my acclimatization. 

 

So to reiterate what other said.....it completely varies and has no real rhyme or reason....so people are just more built for the altitude.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion