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New to Snow Blades - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

Not a "Blade Runner" but if you want to work on fore-aft balance throughout the turn, jump on a pair.  @ginammcg1 if you want to try them, go for it.  Thumbs Up

Thumbs Up

 

THIS!  Don't let the few haters scare you away.  Nothing wrong with trying them out at all or choosing that as your primary ride.  Different strokes and all..

post #32 of 54

Whatever lets you experience the joy we all realize through the snow is what its all about.  Thumbs Up

post #33 of 54

Snow blades are an excellent tool to improve;

 

A. You're fore aft balance

B. The width of your stance

C. Carving skills

 

 

They give instantaneous feedback when your stance is too narrow, your in the back seat  or have too much weight on your inside blade. 

 

Many skiers here could greatly benefit by jumping on a pair fro a couple of hours to hone their skiing skills!

 

I have 2 pair of Volkl Double Trouble and may consider selling 1 pair. Adjustable non-releasable bindings

post #34 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post


So in all of this rather long winded diatribe, at what point did you address the primary point I have made? That point being that skiblades utility and ability is limited when compared to skis.


 

 

I attempted to answer all your questions, and those of others. Unfortunately you entered this thread with a negative attitude and seem determined to remain in that stance. In reality there is nothing I could say or show you that would change your opinion. My goal was to show you that skiboarding has evolved from the skiblades of years ago. You are the one who wants to compare it to skiing. At the very least I just hoped to show the forum that the example in the video is of an athlete preforming a high level of expertise on quality equipment. Not the Eurocarver on plastic toys you like to make fun of. It's shame you can't acknowledge that, but I do hope you stay thirsty my friend. 

 

Skiboarding is just a small part of my mountain experience. I use them in the right conditions for fun, which is really all that matters to me.

post #35 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


Well, that's something I never expected to see in this, or any other, thread. Out of respect, I'm going to say that I'll have to think about that.

I don't understand snow blades, but I'm not scared of them either.

 

 

Fair enough. It is definitely a minority sport. I prefer to pay for my turns, but many skiers and skiboarders prefer to earn them.

 

This is H.J. Burhenne, circa 1971, from his book on spring skiing in the Sierras. I believe he is on 120s

 

 

 

 

And his unlucky compatriots back packing their longer skis.

 

 

 

Making his descent.

 

 

 

 

And finally, the modern version of an older sport.

 

post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

I attempted to answer all your questions, and those of others. Unfortunately you entered this thread with a negative attitude and seem determined to remain in that stance. In reality there is nothing I could say or show you that would change your opinion. My goal was to show you that skiboarding has evolved from the skiblades of years ago. You are the one who wants to compare it to skiing. At the very least I just hoped to show the forum that the example in the video is of an athlete preforming a high level of expertise on quality equipment. Not the Eurocarver on plastic toys you like to make fun of. It's shame you can't acknowledge that, but I do hope you stay thirsty my friend. 

 

Skiboarding is just a small part of my mountain experience. I use them in the right conditions for fun, which is really all that matters to me.

 

There's always gonna be people who try to prove that no one should hunt with a longbow because firearms are so cracking superior.

 

I must say that this thread has made me think about upgrading my Y2Kish Rossi Free Ventures to something with modern bindings.

 

post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post

...And his unlucky compatriots that forgot to bring their skins.



I fixed your comment on that picture for you.
post #38 of 54
Longbows...... Who don't hunt with them? I probally hold the site record of being at Sawmill ( Denton Hill ) 25 or more times and never skied it. Trad archery shoot and let me tell you lots of people shoot longbows, so don't let them buck ya do what you like.
post #39 of 54

Several years back I had the opportunity to play on blades and had a learning curve to overcome.

 

They have no tail to sit back on or for that matter no front to lean forward on :eek.

 

They are an ideal ski to check on how balanced you are on groomed slopes and really work well in checking out your carving technique for that reason (for an experienced skier).  An unbalanced moves instantly become noticeable as they either spin you out or sit you down....Lesson learned and embarrassed.  Several runs and lessons learned quickly help refine your balance.

 

Once you get past that they are a blast, however, I still prefer my GS or SL skis.

 

One other note for a new skier they might be a hindrance in learning as they could develop some nasty habits very quickly because of the ease at which they can be skied incorrectly.

post #40 of 54

They're also very easy to learn both skating and underpush (right leg extension to the left of the CoM and vice versa) moves on;  both of those can be learned on conventional skis but the skis that are best for learning them are also one-trick-ponies. 

post #41 of 54

@cantunamunch please describe "underpush" again.  I'm not getting it, and haven't heard that term before.

It sounds like but can't be pushing on the LTE while crossing the legs over each other, as in figure skating.

post #42 of 54

pushing on the LTE of the inside leg while extending it.     

It's a building block so it can  be done while crossing the legs over each other (ice skates); it's really useful when skating on skis after the outside leg has already left the ground.    If you can't do it on your skis at first, try a really soft, really rockered pair (i.e. well nigh useless for regular BTE edging)  to get the sensation.  Or....snowblades.   :D

post #43 of 54

LTE??

post #44 of 54

Little Toe Edge

post #45 of 54

Tuna, why would I ever want to underpush?  I don't get it.  OK in figure skating for crossing over.  But in skiing?  I can't think of a skating maneuver that calls for this.  What am I missing?

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

Tuna, why would I ever want to underpush?  I don't get it.  OK in figure skating for crossing over.  But in skiing?  I can't think of a skating maneuver that calls for this.  What am I missing?

 

Higher skating speed at the same cadence and a longer glide phase because the CoM has *time* to restack on top of the stance leg.    

Since it's a dynamic balance move it requires a certain speed to achieve at all.

post #47 of 54

Hmmm....never been coached in skating, but I would never think about riding the ski so long that I could move my CoM beyond upright.  That seems to be what you are advocating, yes?

post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

Hmmm....never been coached in skating, but I would never think about riding the ski so long that I could move my CoM beyond upright.  That seems to be what you are advocating, yes?

 

Yup.   Try it.   It's way addictive.

post #49 of 54
Thread Starter 

I guess my only question still is about bindings... I have only been skiing for a few years so I am still unsure of the technicalities involving gear. What are some good quality bindings that won't break the bank? Does anyone know if SnowJam Phenoms are a good enough quality of a blade to put release bindings on?

 

I've come to the conclusion that the 90 cm blades would be best for me until I could get more experienced and get used to balancing. 

 

Also, I ski on groomed snow...no pow :(

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

Hmmm....never been coached in skating, but I would never think about riding the ski so long that I could move my CoM beyond upright.  That seems to be what you are advocating, yes?

 

Yup.   Try it.   It's way addictive.

Oh.  I get that.  I think it's in the PSIA Level III skating description.  Place the new ski down on its LTE and propel off it.  The ski will instantly flip to the new edge without sliding out.  You get more bang for the buck.  A skiing version of that is known as ILE in some circles, Inside Leg Extension.  

 

I've never heard this referred to as underpush.  Something new every day.

post #51 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginammcg1 View Post
 

I guess my only question still is about bindings... I have only been skiing for a few years so I am still unsure of the technicalities involving gear. What are some good quality bindings that won't break the bank? Does anyone know if SnowJam Phenoms are a good enough quality of a blade to put release bindings on?

 

I've come to the conclusion that the 90 cm blades would be best for me until I could get more experienced and get used to balancing. 

 

Also, I ski on groomed snow...no pow :(

 

This is not a trivially answered question - your blades are so short that it would be *very* easy for a conventionally mounted release binding to change the flex and make a dead spot in the middle (not to mention the issue of screws going through the blade or ripping clean out because there isn't enough material thickness to hold them).     Non-releasable bindings tend to group screws in one cluster near the center of the blade, for this very reason.

 

Sadly I can't give you specific information; I'm 10 years out of date on the issue.

post #52 of 54

Well said above.

 

Additionally from my understanding because blades are so short that there is little risk of catching a ski enough to cause injury that would require binding release to prevent it for the most part, which is why you see a lot of blades with non releasing bindings.

 

The ones I skied had non release bindings.

post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginammcg1 View Post
 

I guess my only question still is about bindings... I have only been skiing for a few years so I am still unsure of the technicalities involving gear. What are some good quality bindings that won't break the bank? Does anyone know if SnowJam Phenoms are a good enough quality of a blade to put release bindings on?

 

I've come to the conclusion that the 90 cm blades would be best for me until I could get more experienced and get used to balancing. 

 

Also, I ski on groomed snow...no pow :(

 
If you have to have release bindings I would go with a factory product like the Head 94s. I found these are on ebay for $175. They are wider that old style skiblades but still short enough to be fun. They come with factory installed Tyrolia SP100 bindings. These would be a great boards to use on the groomers.
 

Most skiboards come with snowboard style 4x4 steel inserts that allow you to attach non release bindings, release bindings on risers and even modified snowboard bindings. The risers are designed to alleviate the problems of dead spots and screws pulling out. There are many board and binding combinations with their own pros and cons. I would go to the folks at SBOL if you have anymore technical questions. they are skiboard enthusiasts who are up to date with all the latest technologies and products. Just follow the forum link and sign up.

 

Skiboards Online Members Forum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #54 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginammcg1 View Post
 

I guess my only question still is about bindings... I have only been skiing for a few years so I am still unsure of the technicalities involving gear. What are some good quality bindings that won't break the bank? Does anyone know if SnowJam Phenoms are a good enough quality of a blade to put release bindings on?

 

I've come to the conclusion that the 90 cm blades would be best for me until I could get more experienced and get used to balancing. 

 

Also, I ski on groomed snow...no pow :(

 

With a ski that short, there isn't going to be very often that you're going to get enough force to actually release a binding that has been set to standard DIN's. I have never seen a separate skiblade DIN chart, but I don't know if one exists. There simply isn't that much ski there, so there's less of a lever to act against the binding. However, if you're going to mount a releasable binding onto a blade, I'd suggest avoiding 'system' bindings. In other words, don't buy a binding system where the toe piece and heel piece are connected to one another. Go with a binding that mounts the toe piece and heel piece as two separate units. that should help alleviate the 'dead spot' issue. The Look PX12 or Rossi Axial 120 (same binding, different branding) is a good binding that is inexpensive.

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