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New gear recommendation (after a decade) for expert NE skier! [drives from Toronto]

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone,

 

I've been lurking around the site for a while and now find myself in a position where I need your help!

 

I have not updated my gear in about 10 years! Partly because I try to take care of my equipment and partially because I don't get to ski as much as I used to due to my job. The skis I'm currently on... K2 Mach S from 2002 I believe. They have served me extremely well for the skier I was for the majority of their use. But I've started to explore a bit more.

 

When I bought the skis, I was a full-on carver on the groomers. Loved cutting hard into the snow with short turns and zipperlining under the lifts. I still thoroughly enjoy this, but spend probably about 50-60% of my time on that kind of skiing. I started exploring the trees at some point and getting more involved with the bumps and, if you've skied the Mach S, you'll know that they don't do very well in the glades. I ski primarily in the North East. I'm from Toronto and often head to Quebec (Tremblant, Mont Ste. Anne) and am exploring Vermont soon (Jay Peak, Killington).

 

I'm not looking for a GS style ski. I still prefer the short turns and zipperlines at medium to high speed, with some glade and bump play mixed in. I ski nights sometimes so when the surface gets hard, the Machs, IMO, aren't the greatest b/c they were designed to be skied shorter than a typical ski, so they don't do much for confidence in those conditions.

 

I know this is asking a lot of a one-ski quiver, but from the crazy amount of reading I've done, it seems like the Nordica Hell&Back would do the trick really nicely. The Volkl Mantra's seem like they are too aggressive and speedy for my needs. I've also looked at the Atomic Theory and they sound like a great ski but seem to be geared towards a more intermediate skier. So I am a tad stuck.

 

Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated!

 

Edit: forgot to mention!... I'm 6'3 and my weight fluctuates between 185-190lbs.

 

Cheers,

K

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 10

You may want to go to Corbett's Ski in Oakville this weekend, they're having a big sale on last year's items.  Talk to them, see what they recommend. They have plenty of carvers and all-mountain skis, and a few wider ones too.  They might even have a couple Brahmas left, or something like those which might be up your alley.

post #3 of 10

Oooh.   I loved the Mach S.   Sure it was stiff but it was damp damp damp.

post #4 of 10

Well, Houston we have a problem. Sounds as if, based on where you ski, you're still mainly going to be on groomers, doing bumps and hardback, with maybe some tree skiing when there's snow to justify it. Unless you get a season ticket at Jay. IMO, for a guy your size, that's a real problem. For any float in trees, you'll want something in the 100's, but for zippering bumps or solid carving, the limits seem to be in the 90's. As a compromise, I'd check out the Nordica NRGY100, Blizzard Bonafide, Experience 100, and if you have the $$, the Stockli SR 100. But if trees truly occupy you half the time - which seems weird, I live in NE, have a season ticket at K-ton, the trees generally aren't worth my bases more than 20% of the time, and I know Montreal area isn't any better - then try the Supernatural 108, or the Kastle BMX108, or the Helldorado. But something will have to be compromised; they aren't going to tear up hardback. Unless you get sensible, give in to the quiver concept, buy a 80-something now for the honest 80% of your skiing, and next March a 110+ for that other 20% that you think is 50%. ;) Seriously. 

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much for the feedback guys. Gunnerbob, thanks for the Corbett's tip. I may pay them a visit tomorrow morning.
Cantuna - fun at night eh wink.gif
Beyond, i probably should have clarified the percentages a little. When i said trees and bumps there it's more like 60% groomer, 20% trees, 20% moguls, fair? I wasn't trying to construe anything or be a smartass. Sorry if it came across that way.
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keller View Post

Cantuna - fun at night eh wink.gif

 

Oh my, yes.   There is a crew of beer league racers down here who still baby theirs a decade after they stopped making them and wouldn't /think/ of putting them in the swap.    Some of them now exhibit enthusiasm for Atomic double deck designs, but it is not the same.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keller View Post

Beyond, i probably should have clarified the percentages a little. When i said trees and bumps there it's more like 60% groomer, 20% trees, 20% moguls, fair? I wasn't trying to construe anything or be a smartass. Sorry if it came across that way.

 

Would you be willing to go a little further though?    Would you be willing to split the tree terrain into  icy trees, icy trees with bumps in between,  and actual powdery hidden tree stashes?

I'm not trying to beat you over the head, just trying to get away from the semantic default of 'skiing trees calls for fat skis'.   If the only fresh snow in 2 weeks is barely 30cm, skiing icy moguls in between boles and turning in the same spot as 30-40-50 others before you becomes the reality of NE tree skiing. 

I guess what I'm saying is - pick your semi skinny groomer ski, make it something that can deal with icy bumps in January and early February and take your time picking out a March/April fatty.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Oh my, yes.   There is a crew of beer league racers down here who still baby theirs a decade after they stopped making them and wouldn't /think/ of putting them in the swap.    Some of them now exhibit enthusiasm for Atomic double deck designs, but it is not the same.

That is amazing. See I wish I'd babied mine a bit more, but when I finally scraped some coin to buy them when I was 17, I just wanted to shred everything. They were my first pair of parabolic skis after having learned to ski on straights so it was an indescribable experience. Definitely left me more breathless than my girlfriend at the time.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Would you be willing to go a little further though?    Would you be willing to split the tree terrain into  icy trees, icy trees with bumps in between,  and actual powdery hidden tree stashes?

I'm not trying to beat you over the head, just trying to get away from the semantic default of 'skiing trees calls for fat skis'.   If the only fresh snow in 2 weeks is barely 30cm, skiing icy moguls in between boles and turning in the same spot as 30-40-50 others before you becomes the reality of NE tree skiing. 

I guess what I'm saying is - pick your semi skinny groomer ski, make it something that can deal with icy bumps in January and early February and take your time picking out a March/April fatty.

 

No love lost. Anything that will help me make a more informed decision is helpful. I'll be the first to admit I've got a lot of catching up to do on the technology and such, since it was basically set it and forget it with my Machs. You bring up a great point I didn't really think about too much. You pretty much nailed it though, the majority of the time it is icy trees with bumps. I was in Tremblant a few years back and got lucky when it dumped a bunch shortly before I arrived but that's the exception, not the rule, for sure.

 

How much width underfoot would you recommend? I would imagine nothing with a waist wider than 90mm for the groomer application.

post #8 of 10

I ski mostly at Tremblant and I have skis from 68 mm to 117 mm and most of the time I'm on skis from 68 to 88mm and sometimes on the larger ones... In your case, I guess you also ski sometimes nearby in smaller hills... so if you want just 1 pair, I would go with something from 72mm to 85 max...

 

Could I interest you in these? :rolleyes

http://www.epicski.com/t/124259/dynastar-speed-cross-178cm

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

Really appreciate all the feedback guys and special thanks to the guys who let me know about the Corbett's sale this past weekend. That was a blessing.

 

I spoke to a few of the guys there as well, taking into consideration all the feedback I got here + discussing other things I didn't even think of or consider when I made my post here. Based on all that and because of the amazing sale they had going on, I picked up a fresh (2014) pair of Kendos with Griffon 13's for around $570 all-in. I've already got a week booked at Jay and will probably do a second, and they should do just fine on the crappy hills we have in the area.

 

Now before I get bashed, I'm still keeping my K2's for the zipperlining I mentioned earlier. At the end of the day, I'm a firm believer in the skiier making the ski and not the other way around. I learned to ski on straights and was learning to ski trees (not in icy conditions) on my K2's (a 64mm waist ski) and still had plenty of fun. I've no doubt I'm going to have a good time regardless. They are just a means to an end... and the end will be glorious. I'll learn to use the tools I'm given rather than letting the tools dictate what I can do. See ya on the slopes!

post #10 of 10

I had a pair of Kendo (before the rocker era) and they are really nice skis for carving big turns and for bumps! You will have fun!

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