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Taking a gap year to ski - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaman View Post
 

DING DING DING.  The true key to success is YOUR work ethic and impressing others with it.

Being born to white parents with wealth is actually statistically the most important thing in the US.  College degree is next and that is this topic.

post #32 of 47

i think OP you need to dig down and invest some time doing some "soul-searching" to see what you want to do.  

There are a lot of books in the "self-help" category that can help you make the best decision that you are happy with, such as 

 

http://www.amazon.com/What-Color-Parachute-Teens-Edition/dp/158008141X

 

or search around your library for the other books on that same shelf.

 

If you think the "teen" targetted books are too much of a 1dimensional track to go to college and pick a job; take a look at the general/adult general self-help books on life that are more to help people that are having their soul crushed in an Office Space world.

 

But end of the day you get what you put into it.  Spend some time properly investigating and researching and I think you will feel more comfortable and confident with your decision, rather then crowdsourcing it to the interwebs.


Edited by raytseng - 9/17/14 at 8:20pm
post #33 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanHolman View Post
 

I'm a senior in high school from the suburbs of Chicago and I can't decide what to do.  On one hand I want to go to college, get a degree and become successful that way. On the other hand I want to move to Colorado and live the ski bum type of life.  I just worry that if I go to college and live that typical lifestyle in 10 or 20 years I may look back and wonder why I didn't move and ski everyday while my body would still be able to.  Just wondering if any of you have been in my situation and what you did.  any advice would be appreciated

Though I was one who gave my .02 above....Honestly....This is one of those MAJOR decisions that you should probably consult with your parents, pastor (if applicable), teachers, etc. rather than a bunch of strangers on a ski forum.;)

post #34 of 47

No advice.

 

Despite the grades and finances to go, I just had no interest in college straight out of school. All I cared about were old British motorcycles, real ale, girls and Moroccan Red to make all three seem better. I intended to get to college someday, but I just kept finding other stuff to do.

 

I ran a wine tasting room, sold hardware, became a postman, moved to Germany,  sold Harley Davidsons to US Servicemen, moved to the US, became a fireman, became a paramedic, got married, got kids, did taxes for people, taught martial arts. I always worked hard and doors kept opening for me.

 

But, by forty five I found myself needing a house and health care benefits for the family. My wife supported us whilst I finally went to college became registered in cardiac ultrasound. My wife, who ditched college to be a paramedic, is now working on her masters to be a PA. I'm looking forward to my golfing and skiing retirement in a few years.

 

Life can be fun and spontaneous if you allow it to be. There is time for everything in life and it doesn't have to happen in the "right" order. I wouldn't change a thing.

 

Your journey may differ.

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagles Pdx View Post
 

Being born to white parents with wealth is actually statistically the most important thing in the US.  College degree is next and that is this topic.

Affirmative Action has worked great for me.

post #36 of 47

He is suggesting a year off not 10.  People act as if getting into college is extremely hard and that if you turn down college right away you will not get another chance. Entirely untrue.

 

If you go to community college first and get your associates many schools will accept you because they see you are a serious student.  There is a very high freshman drop out rate and student retention is a major issue for a lot of schools.

 

There are 1000's of colleges. I was lead to believe that getting into college was such a special and hard earned achievement (I did work hard), but no one told me how much BS there is when it comes to getting into college. A state school will get you the same thing as a private school.

 

If you wait a year you will still be able to go to school.  You are not ruining any future potential. Even if you wait 5 years you are not wasting your potential. It is your time and your life others can have opinions but they do not have to live it.

 

365 days out of your life will go in a blink of an eye.

post #37 of 47
Don't listen to any of these squares. Go live and experience live, have some fun, have some hardship, ski some great days, learn about yourself and what it's really like to survive in your own, and decide if you want to attend school and what you may want to do. Best move you could make. You will just have a year of experience to add to your decision making. So many people jut blindly attend school and take classes in an area that they have no interest or experience in.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanHolman View Post
 

I just worry that if I go to college and live that typical lifestyle in 10 or 20 years I may look back and wonder why I didn't move and ski everyday while my body would still be able to. 

 

I sure as hell hope your body hasn't withered and died by the time you're 28 or 38, LOL!  In 10 to 20 years you'll just be hitting your stride unless you really let yourself go -- so says this 47 year-old who's in better shape than he was at 18. You have lots of time ahead of you.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tundra View Post
 

Many people still have the mentality that going to college right after high school is the best way to go, but many of my friends who started college later were way more serious about their degree. They also made better financial decisions with school. Most of the graduated with a better GPA, spent less money, and had more incentive to do the work(they had to pay for college themselves).

 

 

That was my case right there. I started college after having spent several years supporting myself as a land surveyor, so by the time I made the decision to go to college I had a reason and motivation. While I overheard classmates complain, "I can't believe we have to be here right now" in my head I was thinking, "F you, you don't have to be here at all. Don't distract me because I'm going the distance, MF-ers." For a lot of students who go straight into undergrad I think for them it must just be high school part II. If you have motivation to continue with college next year then do it while you have momentum, but if it will be high school part II then perhaps a gap year will help you get your mind right. 

 

By the way, back when I went to college there was no such concept as "gap year." You were either in college or you were in the workforce. We had to commit one way or the other.

 

I feel that college should be about personal, intellectual, social, and cognitive development rather than just simply job training, but if you want higher education to be career training (which is practical and realistic) then really it's all about the grad school -- not undergrad.

post #39 of 47
Ur asking a bunch or spoiled brats who don't have to worry about whether they will ski before college or during or after because they are privileged. You can never go wrong by pursueing something you enjoy. What is the point of life otherwise? Go
For it. I did it later in life, and am very happy I did so. You rarely regret having an unorthodox experience
post #40 of 47
I agree with the gap year. The fact your posting this makes me guess your mature enough to handle it. I'm not sure when to take the gap year but I strongly encourage u to do it. I took a 15 year break from skiing for career distractions. At 45, I try to fly out west every chance I get and dream of a way to ski for a season. Even though I have the means to do it, I have 3 kids in school that make this challenging. Do it while u can. Out of my group of my friends that took a year off to ski, they've all gone back to successful lives. One of them ended up staying in Colorado. The rest went back to life. Oh how I wish I had joined them.
post #41 of 47

If you don't know what you want to do, college may be a waste of time and money.  In reality, the only time college is a necessity is if you're going for something like a doctor, nurse, lawyer, etc that requires a degree.

 

I took a year off after graduation.  I just worked a simple part-time job at the Waffle House and bummed at the beach most of the time.  Then I went to college and got a B.A. degree and then started my own business.

 

Do life on YOUR terms.  You're young and you have plenty of time.

 

When you get older, you'll not only have college and a job to hold you back...but possibly a girlfriend, wife, and/or kids.

post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman View Post
 

If you don't know what you want to do, college may be a waste of time and money. 

College is one of the single biggest predictors of income and it doesn't really matter what you get a degree in it will raise you up vs. no-degree.

 

There's also the tried and true liberal arts philosophy that education is good in and of itself and opens up a lot of the world.

 

If the idea is to ski, I'd pick a school in ski country and one that I could make the ski team vs. the gap year just skiing.  It would improve the skiing, you get in more skiing and wouldn't miss a year plus school room and board is probably less than ski area room and board.

post #43 of 47
So there's all this debate about going to college or not. Let me give some perspective on the ski bum aspect. I was a ski bum. Full time, 120+ days on snow per year ski bum. I was in my early 20's, life was good. Do you know what I had in common with all my fellow ski bums? My age. We were all in our 20's. Not teens. Ski bum life happens in two places: on the hill and in the bar. 90% of the really good stuff happens at the bar. So if you jump on this "ski bum" train right out of high school, you'll be missing out on most of the scene. Frankly, when I was 23, I wouldn't hang out with some 18 year old kid on the mountain. So you can take the year now,but it'll end up being a lot of you being on the outside looking in, trying to fit in but not. Don't do the ski bum thing til you're 21.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanHolman View Post
 

I'm a senior in high school from the suburbs of Chicago and I can't decide what to do.  On one hand I want to go to college, get a degree and become successful that way. On the other hand I want to move to Colorado and live the ski bum type of life.  I just worry that if I go to college and live that typical lifestyle in 10 or 20 years I may look back and wonder why I didn't move and ski everyday while my body would still be able to.  Just wondering if any of you have been in my situation and what you did.  any advice would be appreciated

 

Join the military! Seriously. You'll definitely have a foot up on your peers when you get out, depending on what MOS you get. And the G.I Bill. You can even use that for pilot training if you wanted to. And you might still be able to get skiing in. I don't know how it works in other branches, but in the Marine Corps if you finished 1st in your class (at least with my MOS), you got your pick of duty station. I finished 3rd and got Camp Pendleton, which wasn't too bad, skiing wise. If I got first I probably would've tried to go to Bridgeport, CA.

 

I'd pick Army though, they have the most bases. 

 

Granted you might go to Afghanistan, but the numbers are dwindling. 

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post
 

 

Join the military! Seriously. You'll definitely have a foot up on your peers when you get out, depending on what MOS you get. And the G.I Bill. You can even use that for pilot training if you wanted to. And you might still be able to get skiing in. I don't know how it works in other branches, but in the Marine Corps if you finished 1st in your class (at least with my MOS), you got your pick of duty station. I finished 3rd and got Camp Pendleton, which wasn't too bad, skiing wise. If I got first I probably would've tried to go to Bridgeport, CA.

 

I'd pick Army though, they have the most bases. 

 

Granted you might go to Afghanistan, but the numbers are dwindling. 

If you go Air Force and go space pretty much all the bases are near skiing. Colorado is the primary location, training is at  vandenberg which is a little far from skiing but it does have private beaches with access to some of the best surfing in the area. 

post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post
 

If you go Air Force and go space pretty much all the bases are near skiing. Colorado is the primary location, training is at  vandenberg which is a little far from skiing but it does have private beaches with access to some of the best surfing in the area. 


Talk about thread drift...guy asks about ski bumming for a gap year and getting advice to skip college and skiing and go Air Force.

post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by EthanHolman View Post
 

I'm a senior in high school from the suburbs of Chicago and I can't decide what to do.  On one hand I want to go to college, get a degree and become successful that way. On the other hand I want to move to Colorado and live the ski bum type of life.  I just worry that if I go to college and live that typical lifestyle in 10 or 20 years I may look back and wonder why I didn't move and ski everyday while my body would still be able to.  Just wondering if any of you have been in my situation and what you did.  any advice would be appreciated

 

 

Go to college when you are the same age as the incoming freshmen. Trust me on this one.  Even when you come out at 22, you are still a youngin in a ski town. (with a degree foir that matter).

 

SAome don't like college, but for others its the best 4-5 years of their lives.

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