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snowmobile?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know anything about snowmobiles?  I am thinking of purchasing one, but have not a clue as to where to start, what to get, etc.  I have looked up some info and it seems like there are a few varieties.  Long distance, performance, and cross over (i think).  I don't want to spend a huge amount of money (less then 3000) but want something a bit up to date but am totally clueless on this topic.  If anyone has any info on where to start gathering info, i would greatly appreciate it.  Thanks all!

post #2 of 9
I'm not up on current models, but for skiing you want something stalwart, reliable, and with a long and wide track. Performance models are like sports cars, you probably want something more like a pickup or SUV.

Here are some info resources:
http://www.snowmobileforum.com/
http://www.snowmobileworld.com/

And if you have time to separate wheat from chaff, the inevitable TGR thread, with some good skiing-oriented info buried in all the dick-waving:
http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/137127-Maggot-snowmobile-thread
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

that should be a good start Bob.  I'll get started.  I was thinking that i am going to snowmobile when I'm not skiing (haha) but I'm not really sure.  I may want to take the sled to make some turns, too.  i just have to talk my wife into being the driver!

post #4 of 9
Where will you ride/ski?

It's a lot harder and more expensive than it looks.
post #5 of 9

I have been snowmobiling since I was 6 and I still have one to this day and I'm 43. Snowmobiles are really easy to drive, so you don't need to start on a 340 - 550 fan as you will outgrow these in a few weeks of riding. 800 + cc 2 strokes and 1000 cc + turbo 4 strokes are probably to much sled for a beginner, they are fine on a lake but hard to handle on tight twisty trails. The sweet spot is the 500cc to 600cc liquid cooled 2 stroke engine and the 1000cc to 1200cc non turbo  4 strokes which performance wise is equivalent to the 500-600cc 2 strokes.  4 strokes are more reliable, more expensive, and heavier but offer better gas mileage.  2 strokes are less reliable, but lighter and cheaper. In the end something like this one would be a good place to start and it's in your area.

 

http://vehicles.oodle.com/view/2008-ski-doo-mxz-adrenaline-600-h-o-sdi/3735389931-boston-ma/

 

Happy hunting.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

Where will you ride/ski?

It's a lot harder and more expensive than it looks.

mostly southern VT and I have ridden a handful of times (on trail only) so it will be a new experience riding up a mountain

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EasternCanadian View Post
 

I have been snowmobiling since I was 6 and I still have one to this day and I'm 43. Snowmobiles are really easy to drive, so you don't need to start on a 340 - 550 fan as you will outgrow these in a few weeks of riding. 800 + cc 2 strokes and 1000 cc + turbo 4 strokes are probably to much sled for a beginner, they are fine on a lake but hard to handle on tight twisty trails. The sweet spot is the 500cc to 600cc liquid cooled 2 stroke engine and the 1000cc to 1200cc non turbo  4 strokes which performance wise is equivalent to the 500-600cc 2 strokes.  4 strokes are more reliable, more expensive, and heavier but offer better gas mileage.  2 strokes are less reliable, but lighter and cheaper. In the end something like this one would be a good place to start and it's in your area.

 

http://vehicles.oodle.com/view/2008-ski-doo-mxz-adrenaline-600-h-o-sdi/3735389931-boston-ma/

 

Happy hunting.

this is good info to start with.  Thanks very much EC

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

EC, i just checked that add out.  That looks like it could be a good sled.  How many miles can you typically get on a two stroke engine?  Similar to the amount of miles on a car?  If so, it has a lot of life left.  Again, i have no idea what i'm talking about when it comes to these machines.

post #9 of 9


Hello Kid326,

 

I tried to send an response from work but the filters would not let me respond. To answer your question there is a lot of life left in that machine. At 1279 miles that is actually quite low. I have a friend who has a 2002 MXZ 500 that has 9300 hard miles on it and it has never had engine work and it looks like show room condition. It also does not burn oil and the compression is good at 150 for both cylinders. The key is to be meticulous with your maintenance and to use a top quality synthetic oil. My friend and I both use AMS oil. It's expensive but worth it. To get back on topic a two stroke averages about 5000 to 6000 miles before needing a top end rebuild, remember though that's an average you could get 9000 + miles like my friend or you could get 3000 if your unlucky. My snowmobile has 6000 miles and is due for a top end rebuild as it starts and runs but burns oil and like nobodies business and one cylinder has low compression. Now up here in Canada there are guys who may rebuild the top end once or twice and get 15000 miles before having to due a major rebuild from top to bottom, so in the end the life span is nothing like a car or even a motorcycle for that matter.

 

As for 4 strokes I have never owned one but have heard through my sledding friends and coworkers that a top end rebuild is around 12000 to 15000 miles so essentially double a 2 stroke. You will be hard pressed to find a 4 stroke under $3000. There is nothing wrong with 2 strokes, many still prefer them for the power to weight ratio. A top end rebuild here in Canada is around $1500 at the dealer, so if you do 1500 miles a year which doesn't sound like a lot but is actually quite a bit a mileage in a year, you will do a top end rebuild every once every 4 seasons which is not that bad.

 

If you have any question any more questions don't hesitate.

 

Cheers

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