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Is a one ski quiver even possible?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'm getting my daughter skis for the upcoming winter. I would like to get her one pair of skis if possible. I'm not rich. But, I have a bit of a dilemma. She skis the whole mountain including the park, rails, etc. I suspect despite manufacturer's claims that sliding rails damages the edges on skis but I have no idea how much and whether the damage can be managed by tuning, and how frequently a ski used in this manner needs to tuned. Is the idea of a one ski quiver practical on any level, or is it more of a marketing/hype concept?  I am considering the Shredditor 85 as a one ski quiver for her if one ski is the best option for skiing everything. If not, I'd like to get a cheaper, used park/all mountain ski, and a second ski for everything else.

post #2 of 17

Check out a Salomon Rocker2 100. 17 M-ish radius, full range of lengths, and sounds like it could be a good fit for what you're describing. 

 

From Salomon's site: Twin rocker shape, full wood core and full sandwich construction, the rocker2 100 is equally at home in the park & pipe as it is off piste in powder. one-stop-shopping for freeriders looking for an energetic ski that does it all.

 

These features might also interest you:

 

Fiber reinforcement directly on top of edges improves durability, edge grip, and shock resistance.

A layer of rubber all along the edges and in critical zones of the ski for smoother ride & improved ski-snow contact.

Thicker edges for increased durability and improved shock resistance.

post #3 of 17

riding park will definitely cause more damage to the skis when compared to riding only piste/off-piste on snow... just like skiing rocky terrain causes more damage compared to skiing well covered terrain

 

now considering she is a girl which are usually lighter than boys, she might not be as hard on the skis as a boy would be, so this could help with durability... just like boys usually break their stuff more often than girls :-)

 

depending on what kinda terrain she looks for a twin tip anywhere between 80mm to 100mm underfoot should be a good one ski quiver for her! The shredditor is not too far off

post #4 of 17

Rails will dull the edges of the ski, and park use is generally tougher on a ski.

 

Further, most serious park skiers purposely dull the edges underfoot to keep the ski from unpredictably catching.

 

As far as performance, dulling the underfoot area won't make an enormous difference in the overall performance of the ski- somebody banging gates isn't going to want to take the performance hit, but general recreational skiing in Montana? I wouldn't worry about it.

 

How old is she?

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

She's 10 and small 4'2", 55lbs. She started skiing when she was 5. I'm too old to be a park rat but we do hit all the kickers and  do drops and stuff  like that together. She told me she wanted a ski that she could take to the park not just a powder ski. I'm sort of rethinking my plan to get her one ski. I suppose I can get some trashed-out park ski that will work all mountain for cheap, then get her a nice pow ski for hiking and shredding when its deep.

post #6 of 17

10 yrs old, 4' 2" 55 lbs  all mountain skier and a park rat?  That's just awesome, what a childhood.  Where are the 2018 Games again?

 

I think the trashed out park ski is the best option to keep you from constantly fixing edges on the one ski option.  My daughter's board went through the wars on boxes and rails, but it didn't seem to bother her on the trails.  I don't think skis would be that for giving.

post #7 of 17

agree--used park ski, and a good all mountain ski. I have no idea what an all mountain Montana ski is for a 10 year old. This assumes she's a good skier--carving turns, handling bumps and soft snow. There are 10 year olds who can out ski most of us and 10 year olds who are most definitely intermediates. Important to be honest and not aspirational about her abilities.


Edited by oldgoat - 9/13/14 at 7:47pm
post #8 of 17

Is a one ski quiver even possible?

 

If you are a leg amputee or a monoskier, it is indeed possible.

 

Sorry, could not resist!   

post #9 of 17

I'd say it's definitely possible and I'd do it. If your 10 year old is like most 10 year olds I see on the mountain, she isn't going to want to go into the lodge and change skis depending on what she's doing. She's going to want to get off at the top of the lift, ski down how she feels like, then hit the park on her way back to the lift. If some days she sessions the park and the other she free skis, then maybe that's different, but I don't know too many young skiers who do.

 

At 10 years old and 55 pounds, I doubt that she does too much unfixable damage to her edges on rails. If it was me, I'd get one ski for everything and just plan on buying another pair next season. Girls are likely to grow a ton at that age, so it's not as if you're likely to be able to have the potential all-mountain skis last for 3-4 years anyway.

 

The Shredditor sounds like it might be a good choice. 85mm underfoot is a pretty wide ski for someone that light so she'd have plenty of float. You say she said that she wants a ski that she can take to the park, not just a powder ski. If it's between park and powder, edge sharpness isn't really a problem anyway. With a few quick touch ups, I'm sure you could keep them in condition for everyday use if she isn't focused on carving on really hard snow.

post #10 of 17

For a 10 year old, a one ski quiver is totally possible. Not only is it possible, I can't see why you'd consider anything else. I work in a seasonal program with 9 and 10 year old rippers. None of them have multiple skis in their quiver. And we're in the east, where there would possibly be more need for more skis. Out in Montana, get the kid a medium fat twin tip, and call it a day. You don't need edges out there anyways.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

For a 10 year old, a one ski quiver is totally possible. Not only is it possible, I can't see why you'd consider anything else. I work in a seasonal program with 9 and 10 year old rippers. None of them have multiple skis in their quiver. And we're in the east, where there would possibly be more need for more skis. Out in Montana, get the kid a medium fat twin tip, and call it a day. You don't need edges out there anyways.

 

It all depends on how aggressive she is in the park and how much time she spends on rails.  Rails can do more than simply dull edges...they can break them and even tear them out of the ski altogether.  Beyond that, jumping can cause skis to delam because of how weight can be unevenly distributed on the tips and tails.  Buttering or even simply landing tip/tail heavy off a jump causes a huge amount of flex and can eventually result in some pretty serious damage to the skis.  Personally, I wouldn't recommend the Shreditor in the park.  It has cap construction and a wood core.  Chances are high that they will delam and the moisture that gets inside will rot the core and compromise their structural integrity.  Do yourself a favor and buy her a cheap pair of park skis (potentially used for under $100) and another mid-fat all mountain ski for use outside the park.  

 

Remember, if you do opt for the one ski quiver, the manufacturer's warranty will be void if she uses them on boxes and rails.  IMO, if she is really getting into park, anticipate her breaking her park skis every couple of years.  I go through 2 or 3 pairs every season.  And I would never want to use my park skis outside of the park anyway because they are usually symmetrical, center mounted, and have absolutely no edges.  Just like slalom skis, mogul skis, aerial skis, and jumping skis, park skis have become very specialized.   

 

And I realize she is only 10, but I've coached girls younger than her that put their park skis through some serious abuse.   

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post
 

 

It all depends on how aggressive she is in the park and how much time she spends on rails.  Rails can do more than simply dull edges...they can break them and even tear them out of the ski altogether.  Beyond that, jumping can cause skis to delam because of how weight can be unevenly distributed on the tips and tails.  Buttering or even simply landing tip/tail heavy off a jump causes a huge amount of flex and can eventually result in some pretty serious damage to the skis.  Personally, I wouldn't recommend the Shreditor in the park.  It has cap construction and a wood core.  Chances are high that they will delam and the moisture that gets inside will rot the core and compromise their structural integrity.  Do yourself a favor and buy her a cheap pair of park skis (potentially used for under $100) and another mid-fat all mountain ski for use outside the park.  

 

Remember, if you do opt for the one ski quiver, the manufacturer's warranty will be void if she uses them on boxes and rails.  IMO, if she is really getting into park, anticipate her breaking her park skis every couple of years.  I go through 2 or 3 pairs every season.  And I would never want to use my park skis outside of the park anyway because they are usually symmetrical, center mounted, and have absolutely no edges.  Just like slalom skis, mogul skis, aerial skis, and jumping skis, park skis have become very specialized.   

 

And I realize she is only 10, but I've coached girls younger than her that put their park skis through some serious abuse.   

In your opinion, should the park ski be shorter, narrower, and softer than the all-mountain ski? Any suggestions?

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHarry18 View Post
 

In your opinion, should the park ski be shorter, narrower, and softer than the all-mountain ski? Any suggestions?


Most of that stuff comes down to personal preference.  Regarding length, they probably don't need to be any shorter than what she normally skis.  If you go with a center mount they are going to feel a lot shorter so she may even prefer something slightly longer.  In terms of width, most park skis are in the 85mm to 90mm range.  I personally prefer something between 90mm and 100mm.  And again, flex is going to be a preference thing.  Because she is pretty light I would probably go with something on the softer side.  At her size she probably won't notice a ski being too soft, but she'll definitely notice a ski being too stiff.  Wood cores are great, just be careful of a wood core paired with cap construction. 

 

All that being said, budget for the skis eventually getting beat to hell.  Most ski company's manufacture a cheap park ski that can be replaced each year without too much of a blow to the wallet.  The skis are not well built but that is because they anticipate they will break from daily park abuse anyway.  Search on Evo or a similar online retailer for kids park skis that are 1 or 2 seasons old.  You'll find something brand new but for about 40%-60% off the original sticker price.  Usually shipping is free.  Let me know what you find and I'd be happy to offer my opinion. 

 

Oh and just so you can get an idea of the damage you should expect from a well used pair of park skis I've attached pictures of mine from last season. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mine aren't all that bad when compared to my friends that are full-blown park rats. 

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

Nice pictures. I'm guessing I would have trouble doing that much damage to a ski if I ran over it in the parking lot. I have a bead on a pair of 4front Grom 2013 in a 127cm, at 114.00. Should I pull the trigger?

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHarry18 View Post
 

Nice pictures. I'm guessing I would have trouble doing that much damage to a ski if I ran over it in the parking lot. I have a bead on a pair of 4front Grom 2013 in a 127cm, at 114.00. Should I pull the trigger?


I checked them out...they look legit and definitely better than other similarly priced skis I saw.  At $114 it is really hard to go wrong.  If she gets two seasons out of them its a home run.  If you're lucky she'll get more.  I'd go for it.  How tall is she?  I did see a cheaper pair on Ebay but they are only available in the 117cm, which for any kid over 4' is probably too small.   

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 


She's 4'2" 55lbs. Based on your earlier advice I am looking at the 127cm.  I'm getting her the Shredditor 85 in a 129, maybe a bit long for the steep, tight trees we like to ski but they are twin-tips.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHarry18 View Post
 

Nice pictures. I'm guessing I would have trouble doing that much damage to a ski if I ran over it in the parking lot.

 

You're right. A hard landing on packed snow exerts a lot more force on a ski than a fraction of your car's weight spread out by the tire. If your kid is going to be hitting up the park, make sure you're ready to buy skis, and have good health insurance! Sincerely, a former park rat.

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