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go pro versus dslr - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Yes. It's the one. And it's the best point and shoot on the market by a very long shot (the asterisks are the two new cameras introduced this week- Canon g7x and Panasonic LX100. Lx is likely too big and g7x may not have good video, but both should be extremely capable as photo tools. $800 is a lot but it's small, well built and takes amazing photos. If you can leave without a viewfinder the Mk2 is cheaper. If you don't need the tilt screen you can get the Mk1 version cheaper yet. I believe costco carried either mk1 or mk2 version. If you never shot with a large sensor camera you will be amazed by what comes out of this little camera.
post #32 of 40

It's on my Amazon Wish List, for that sugar daddy I haven't met yet.  I don't really need a camera, but you never know.  Might as well mark it down now and look for it to eventually get cheaper....Lots cheaper.  

post #33 of 40

Another item for the sugar daddy:  The just-released today Panasonic LX100 and its clone (Leica D-Lux) look fantastic.  Bright lenses, huge sensors (4/3 size, even bigger than 1-inch), and 4K video from full sensor readout.  And still ski jacket pocketable.  

 

That 4K full sensor video is a biggie. It gives you 8Mpix stills from frame grabs, so you can shoot video and then just find a perfect moment, and presto, you have an 8Mpix photograph to print and frame.  

 

At $900 list price it is spendy, but it is awfully close to one camera you would ever need.   Some may even call it revolutionary, because you get a DSLR image quality and bokeh (background blur) in a pocketable unit.  

post #34 of 40
That one looks a bit bulky for a pocket, but okay if you carry a pack. Another one to mark down for myself, but not for those who want the sleek look in their ski outfit.
post #35 of 40
If the outfit is a concern, I'd look at the Sony.
post #36 of 40

I have had quite decent results shooting with the gopro and not using it as a POV camera. I leave it mounted on my helmet, and only turn it on when I am standing still, then I simply look at the person I want to take photo or video of. Most of the footage will not be recognizable as gopro.

Aside from simplicity and convenience (leaving it mounted on my head) if all you want is still photos you can put the gopro into 4K video mode. This will shoot 15 frames per second which are 8.3 megapixels, then you can just choose which frames you want to make into still images.

The image quality of gopro is pretty good, but certainly much lower than a dslr when it comes to still images. Since it seems that what you are looking for is ease of use but decent images I would say the gopro is a decent choice.

As I wrote earlier I typically have it mounted on the front of my helmet and just reach up to press the button when I want to use it. The gopro has different beeping sounds to indicate whether it is starting/stopping recording or being turned off/on. after about a day of use you will be familiar with what beeps indicate what action.

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 

You have lots and lots of options, and should probably avoid a DSLR at all costs.  Why?  DSLRs are great for old guys like me that know what to do with all the buttons and dials so we can create nice photos that someone will have to toss once we die.  You want simple?  Get a "point and shoot" or use your phone.  The point and shoots  (and cameras that do point and shoot and a whole lot more) range in price from $150 two several thousand dollars.  A few grand will get you professional quality photos...which you don't need.  The basic cameras are probably good enough for occasional snapshots or two that you can put online or into an album.  What you give up in a lower price camera is the sharpness and contrast of a really good lens (particularly  in the boarders of the photo), dynamic range (seeing the tones in the blacks and whites), and some technical stuff I won't bore your with. 

 

What brand or camera?  There are many within every budget that will work.  I really like the reviews at www.dpreview.com.  When you check out the reviews, pay attention to battery life and dynamic range if shooting in the cold mountains.  Dynamic range? There is nothing worse than a wonderful photo of the mountains and there is no definition in the snow (it ends up looking all washed out).

 

If checking out dpreview, be sure to see the Best Cameras for Beginners and Best Waterproof Camera section, e.g., http://www.dpreview.com/articles/3436829389/dpreview-recommends-best-waterproof-cameras?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=mainmenu&utm_medium=text&ref=mainmenu   

 


As mentioned above...it is harder to see the LCD in direct sunlight than looking through a viewfinder.  Does it matter that much?  That is up to you.  Chances are you are taking off your gloves and goggles to get take the photo, so an occasional photo composing it through a screen probably is no big deal.  If you are shooting a lot in bright sunlight, using a camera w/o a viewfinder can be a PITA to compose and focus.


What quant sez is the truth. I am a member of a photo club, and I know all too many people who have invested in a DSLR and have never taken the original lens off it to try something else. Yes, you can use a DSLR like a point-and-shoot, but if that's what you want, there are far more convenient solutions. I have a nice DSLR that I ski with, kayak with, bike with, and generally carry everywhere, but I wouldn't recommend it unless your primary mission is pictures.

 

Naybreak sez:

Quote:
 I also have found that point and shoots don't love extreme cold - they generally aren't designed for a ton of exposure.

This is often true - but not always. In particular, the waterproof "ruggedized" cameras often also work fine in the cold, and they are designed for a ton of exposure.

 

In addition to the DSLR, I also have a waterproof Panasonic point-and-shoot. It doesn't produce anything like the image quality of the DSLR, but that's not the point. It will get stuff the DSLR can't, it's easy to take with me, and it has capabilities (like a true optical zoom and adjustable exposure compensation) that most phones don't have. No, it doesn't have either an optical or electronic viewfinder. You have to use the LCD to compose your picture. It does have an optional brightness setting which will crank up the brightness of the LCD when the surroundings are bright, and I find that it works surprisingly well. It helps to take off your goggles or sunglasses, though. In fact, if you're wearing polarized sunglasses and want to take a vertical (portrait) oriented picture, you have to take your shades off. An LCD makes use of polarized light. When I rotate the camera for a vertical picture while wearing polarized sunglasses, the image disappears entirely.

 

People buy DSLRs for image quality, versatility, and ability to focus on moving subjects, among other things. If your main method of displaying your images is small prints, e-mail or Facebook, you don't really need the quality a DSLR offers. A compact will work just fine. If you don't need to do wide-angle landscape shots or put on a big lens for wildlife or sports shooting, you probably don't need interchangeable lenses or a high-end phase-detect focusing system. For family shots, including casual shots of skiing, the focusing and zoom range of a compact will usually work well enough, especially if it has a continuous shooting mode so you can bang off half a dozen shots quickly and only keep the ones that are in focus.

 

A DSLR has a lot of excellent qualities, but, like quant, it doesn't sound like a good solution for your needs. I recommend a waterproof compact with a decent zoom range, exposure compensation, a continuous shooting mode, and a way to brighten the LCD so you can see it in the sun.

 

I hope this helps.

post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by AltitudeAdjust View Post
 

I have had quite decent results shooting with the gopro and not using it as a POV camera. I leave it mounted on my helmet, and only turn it on when I am standing still, then I simply look at the person I want to take photo or video of. Most of the footage will not be recognizable as gopro.

Aside from simplicity and convenience (leaving it mounted on my head) if all you want is still photos you can put the gopro into 4K video mode. This will shoot 15 frames per second which are 8.3 megapixels, then you can just choose which frames you want to make into still images.

The image quality of gopro is pretty good, but certainly much lower than a dslr when it comes to still images. Since it seems that what you are looking for is ease of use but decent images I would say the gopro is a decent choice.

As I wrote earlier I typically have it mounted on the front of my helmet and just reach up to press the button when I want to use it. The gopro has different beeping sounds to indicate whether it is starting/stopping recording or being turned off/on. after about a day of use you will be familiar with what beeps indicate what action.


The GoPro has a very wide angle lens. It may not provide the perspective that you want or were expecting. Or it may be exactly what you wanted. You need to try it out and see.

post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post
 


The GoPro has a very wide angle lens. It may not provide the perspective that you want or were expecting. Or it may be exactly what you wanted. You need to try it out and see.


I definitely agree, with any camera the best policy is to try it and see. Yes the gopro is typically used in a very wide angle mode (superview) but it also has a "medium" and "narrow" view which give an image that is not something that most people associate with the "gopro aesthetic"

 

Every camera has it's trade offs and it's strengths, nothing is perfect. If you want the best quality and beautiful images then a gopro is not the camra you are looking for. If you want convenience, ease of use and decent images, the gopro is extremely helpful in all of those areas. I sold a Sony PMW-EX1 HD camcorder a few years ago and purchased a micro 4/3 camera with a set of lenses, then upgraded to the blackmagic pocket cinema camera. The sony was a fantastic camera that captured beautiful video, audio and had a ton of features. The drawback was that I had to ski with it in an enormous backpack because it was a very large camera. The camera I have now takes beautiful images, but is limited in some areas such as audio and slow motion capabilities, but it fits in the pocket of my ski jacket with a pancake lens on it. This has allowed me to capture many more images in a single day and take the camera on backcountry hikes which I could not have done with the old camera due to its size.

Only the person purchasing the camera knows what is right for them. since the guy that started this thread states that he hates taking photos I would definitely suggest something that he doesn't need to think about and can crop in to the images later to frame them the way he desires. An 8.3 megapixel image (4K video) from a gopro will give plenty of resolution to crop the image how you want and still print out a decent looking 4x6" photo

post #40 of 40
Thread Starter 

At 800-900 bucks. I may be better off paying someone to tag along and take pictures for a day or two and forget the camera. Seriously. some of these cameras look incredible. I guess I was unaware of the possibilities. And with the introduction of the Go Pro 4, prices for the 3 should come down some...if only I had a sugar momma....

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