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Retirement!!! - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post
 

 

 

I'm guessing it would have been your wife that would have killed you..... :D  :popcorn

 

 

Pat , enjoy!   Hope you are better at it than I have been, have retired 3 times (49 the first time) and keep getting tempted back.....

QFT. 

 

Pat, with your good vibes, you'll have some amazing TR's to share in your retirement. 

:yahoo:

 

If you find yourself out our way, look us up.

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by chilehed View Post

How about we all just get back to wishing Pat a blessed retirement?

Congratulations, Pat. Play hard, you earned it!

Thumbs UpThumbs Up

Why screw up a good vibe retirement thread? I very strongly believe retirement, and it's ups and downs, is influenced by the beliefs and actions of the individual involved. Statistics be damned with respect to any individual.

 

Best wishes to you Pat. Looking at what you have done to-date, I just know you'll have a great time without the burdens of a full time job. It's great to be your own boss. I'd love to make some turns if we happen to be in the same area. Among my wishes for this season is to spend some time with Phil and Trish in Tahoe.

 

I slid into retirement several years ago as I never intended to retire, but, the job I was doing went away, and, another one never reappeared. Fortunately, my 35 year corporate experience provided a bronze parachute, life, so far, has been very, very good. 

post #33 of 47

I retired just before I turned 58 and skied 143 days in the first 21 consecutive months of retirement.  The people who post here regularly are a self-selected group with a passionate and physically active hobby independent of work.  The vast majority of people here are likely to benefit from retirement as soon as they can afford it.

 

Quote:

Oh Jesus. Is there any chance you could read my posts carefully instead of clinging to your points like a drowning man?

Probably not, if you have read any of the Park City or Climate Change threads. 

 

Nonetheless the Austrian study EaglesPdx cited brings a few good points to a very complex argument.  The most obvious point is that many early retirements are for health reasons and thus will skew the overall stats.  The  study was able to control for that and found no impact among women.  The men studied were blue collar workers.  It's likely their physical activity decreased in retirement, and furthermore most of the additional mortality was attributed to heart disease and alcohol related illnesses.  If your job involves sitting in front of a computer all day, it's moderately likely (and virtually certain if you're on this Forum) that your physical activity will increase after retirement.  

 

I was very briefly involved in pricing terminated pension plans.  There are standard mortality tables that can be used, and must be for small plans.  But each group has its own unique characteristics, so if the group is big enough you want to use the direct past experience of that group as a guideline. 

post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Crocker View Post
 

Probably not, if you have read any of the Park City or Climate Change threads. 

 

Nonetheless the Austrian study EaglesPdx cited brings a few good points to a very complex argument.  The most obvious point is that many early retirements are for health reasons and thus will skew the overall stats.  The  study was able to control for that and found no impact among women.  The men studied were blue collar workers.  It's likely their physical activity decreased in retirement, and furthermore most of the additional mortality was attributed to heart disease and alcohol related illnesses.  If your job involves sitting in front of a computer all day, it's moderately likely (and virtually certain if you're on this Forum) that your physical activity will increase after retirement.  

 

...

This has been my experience. In the 18 months after I retired from my desk job, I joined a gym, started running my local errands by bike, lost 60 pounds, and got into my best shape in 20 years.

So Pat, just enjoy. Some guys aren't cut out for retirement, but lots are very good at it.

post #35 of 47
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the good wishes!

 

Yesterday was my first full day of retirement.  Got up at 4:15 to take my wife to her (successful) foot surgery, finished up the NASTAR database for next winter's Monday Night Racing series, worked on a Photography presentation for the ski club, and tweaked the design of a new website I'm rolling out.

 

Retirement is wonderful!

post #36 of 47
Quote:
Some guys aren't cut out for retirement, but lots are very good at it.

It's a slam dunk that the OP will be very good at it!

post #37 of 47

I just saw this thread, sorry I'm late to the party.  Pat I've been inspired by you before and will continue to be!  I look forward to following your exploits.  I should retire now or soon, but can't - yet.

post #38 of 47
Thread Starter 

Okay, it's been almost two weeks since I "retired". What's been keeping me busy? I rolled out a new website. Definitely a niche market but it has been getting a lot of attention. It's devoted to the history of skydiving drop zones that are no longer in existence. Between 1962 and 1976 I logged 2,028 sport parachute jumps and 43 military jumps. Many of those old drop zones exist only in memories and I was determined to find a home for them. This project will keep me busy for a while.

 

DZGone.com

 

On Wednesday night I did a presentation on digital photography to my ski club.  I've also picked up some commissions to do some pencil drawings.  I finished one of Derek Jeter for a Yankee fan in time for Jeter's retirement.

post #39 of 47

I would not put stock in any of the statistics on early retirement being bad for your health.  Judging by the huge proportion of Americans being grossly overweight, the only time they get off the couch is to go to work.  I retired a year ago and now have the time to do the things I want, more golf, skiing, biking, hiking and traveling.  Lost 15 lbs., skied 117 days last year (first time since my 20's), including alpine, tele and AT, and I'm loving life.  If you cannot stand retirement, or it is making you unhealthy then you are definitely doing it wrong. 

 

"Sitting is the new smoking" 


Edited by mudfoot - 9/26/14 at 7:58pm
post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
 

 

"Sitting is the new smoking" 

 

 

Signature worthy.

post #41 of 47
Thread Starter 

Three weeks into retirement.....   AARP is asking members to submit selfies showing them holding their membership cards.  I decided to do them one better and put together a short video.

 

post #42 of 47

Congratulations.  It is fun getting up in the AM and the biggest decision is where am I/we going to play golf today or where are we going to ski today.  Or' trout fishing or bass fishing-stream fishing or lake fishing.  Retirement is so full of decision making it poops a guy out.    Not a government study but life experience says if you were a dull/work only person and then you retire with no other interests that you will go back to work or wither.  Some retired men wither quickly and some slowly but the result is the same.  

 

Maybe the real point here is it doesn't really matter what all the studies say because YOU are an individual with your own habits, skills, like and dislikes and you genetic makeup is your own.  Retiring as a police officer says I would die within 18-36 months, be an alcoholic and be divorced and die alone;.  So now it has been 23yrs since I retired, am not an alcoholic, been married for 41 yrs to the same young wife, ski 70-80 days a year, golf handicap in the teens, flyfisherman and tyer, hiker, epic member and enjoying the hell out of life.   

 

So screw the studies and live your own life - we are all individuals and the behavior characteristics of every individual in infintestimal (sic).   Go for it.

        heli 009.JPG       par.JPG         heli 020.JPG

 

IMG_0784.JPGDSC01526.JPG  and I am only 72.   Have a great retirement-no reason to stop now.

post #43 of 47
The new life has begun, Pat. May it last a long time!!

I hung up my sportscoats and ties and became a ski-bum/instructor at age 30, 45 winters ago.

post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 

One of the joys of retirement is to do the things you've put off for years.  As I mentioned earlier I finally launched DZGone.com, a website devoted to identifying defunct skydiving drop zones.  To date I've documented over 500 in all fifty states.  A friend who died a few years ago probably jumped at more different DZs than anyone else. A highpoint every year was to get the annual Bill Ottley Christmas Card. I added a special page to the website displaying those.  I think you'll enjoy checking these out.

 

Here's a sample. Click here to see all 22 of them

 

post #45 of 47
Congrats, I did it about 4 years ago and it's my best "job" ever. That zone looks sort of like Yosemite😱
post #46 of 47
Thread Starter 

You are correct.  That indeed is El Capitan.  The photo was taken August 22nd, 1980

post #47 of 47

Good for you Pat! 

 

Really nice artwork as well.

If you ever come to Mt. Bachelor there are a few Bears there.  I will make a few turns with anyone!   Congratulations!

 

PS, I can ride a unicycle too!

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