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New Ski Prep

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I know, another new ski prep thread.  I did a search and found quite a few, but none really answered my questions.  I bought a new pair of Nordica Steadfasts from Start Haus this spring, and had them mount the bindings.  I am planning to do my own own tuning and waxing, and have been doing a bunch of researching and watching videos to learn.  2 things have me a bit stumped(at this point, but I'm sure more will come with time).

 

1.  Do I need to have a shop grind the bases to ensure they are flat?  I have seen a few places say absolutely, some say no, most don't say anything about it.

 

2.  De-tune or not to de-tune? Again, some say absolutely, some seem to think you should be stoned to death for doing so.  

 

Otherwise, I think I am getting a pretty good grasp on it.  I will be getting the required tuning and waxing tools and taking care of my skis on my own

post #2 of 15
1. Check bases with a trubar to determine if they are flat. Sometimes they are flat but over beveled on the base edge, and will need a grind.

2. De-tuning depends on the tuner, skier, and skis. If edges are tuned properly they should feel smooth and predictable in and out of turns without detuning. If they aren't deburred properly they will feel like they need to be detuned. I've also had geriatric women on older skis say the skis are too sharp, and detuning the tips and tails solved the problem.

Try both, see what works for you
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothRides View Post

Sometimes they are flat but over beveled on the base edge, and will need a grind.

Would that be something that can be done with a filing process when setting the bevels, or absolutely needs ground?

 

The reason I ask is because, around the flat lands, finding a ski shop is not exactly easy.  And if I found one, not sure I would trust them to know what they are doing.

post #4 of 15
Some people still flat file skis, some use the ski visions base flattener, which can do a decent job if you are willing to sweat, but there's no substitute for a proper stone grind.

Where are the flat lands?
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothRides View Post

Some people still flat file skis, some use the ski visions base flattener, which can do a decent job if you are willing to sweat, but there's no substitute for a proper stone grind.

Where are the flat lands?
Iowa. We mark our highest point with a plaque in the middle of a field. Otherwise you would have no clue.
post #6 of 15
I'd imagine Iowa has XC ski shops that do grinds. The purists won't put metal edges on a stone used for Nordic skis, but I'm bet there are shops that do both. In many ways XC grinding requires a higher skill level so you should be better off than with your average alpine shop. And since youre doing your own edge work all you'll need them to do is flatten and structure the bases.
post #7 of 15

1.  If you can't tell that they've been ground, just ask someone from Start Haus.    Chances are they've already done this for you.    Because that's what good ski shops do. 


2.  No.   Because if you detune you need to grind again to get the original edges back  and because detuning is a crutch for bad balance skills 

 

Deburring is often confused with detuning.   Yes, you should learn to deburr. 

post #8 of 15
This geriatric woman would throw a hissy fit if you detuned my skis. If they feel too hooky, a slightly increased base bevel might be called for. Use the guide for what the base bevel is set for and apply a slight bit of pressure. Now stop.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

This geriatric woman would throw a hissy fit if you detuned my skis. If they feel too hooky, a slightly increased base bevel might be called for. Use the guide for what the base bevel is set for and apply a slight bit of pressure. Now stop.

If they are hooky, they probably have a hanging burr! Easily fixed do a search!

 

I am tired of explaining it!

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

If they are hooky, they probably have a hanging burr! Easily fixed do a search!

I am tired of explaining it!
I'm good with the tuning and de-burring(at least in understanding). It was the de-tuning the tips and tails that seems to have a polarized following making me unsure. I will will keep them sharp.
post #11 of 15
I was referring to the area just ahead of the contact point and should have made it clear that my definition of hooky was engaging quicker than I was comfortable with, in a consistent manner, not the ski acting squirrely in an independent manner from its brother.
post #12 of 15

I detuned my Start Haus Steadfast blems last year after skiing them untouched a couple days.  They were hooky in off-piste crap snow then skied much better after detuning.  They also skied bumps better detuned.  

 

I'm not sure, but I get the sense the detune haters don't ski the crap snow I sometimes do.   Melting refrozen slush in steep levitating trees, for example:

 

post #13 of 15
Not sure how much your tune matters in that stuff... I think the improvement was psychological.. 😁 I really only notice the tune on groomers. But I need to get on groomers to get back on the lift.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Not sure how much your tune matters in that stuff..

 

Yeh, me neither.     Only skied Steadfasts twice so I can't comment but, on the other end of the spectrum I've enjoyed race-sharp full camber Sugar Daddies in terrain like that^, even in late season at LL frex.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post
 

Yeah, I know, another new ski prep thread.  I did a search and found quite a few, but none really answered my questions.  I bought a new pair of Nordica Steadfasts from Start Haus this spring, and had them mount the bindings.  I am planning to do my own own tuning and waxing, and have been doing a bunch of researching and watching videos to learn.  2 things have me a bit stumped(at this point, but I'm sure more will come with time).

 

1.  Do I need to have a shop grind the bases to ensure they are flat?  I have seen a few places say absolutely, some say no, most don't say anything about it.

 

2.  De-tune or not to de-tune? Again, some say absolutely, some seem to think you should be stoned to death for doing so.  

 

Otherwise, I think I am getting a pretty good grasp on it.  I will be getting the required tuning and waxing tools and taking care of my skis on my own


I always tune and base prep any new ski before it hits the snow.

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