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How are you conditioning yourself for the ski season? - Page 11

post #301 of 321
I would think skiing uses muscles differently. I am an avid cyclist and skier. I use a Skier ' s Edge as well as cycling in the summer and always feel like my legs are fresh to cycle after using the Edge. Just anecdotal but feels like a great mix.
post #302 of 321

Running down stairs is hard on the knees; you should save your knees for skiing.

post #303 of 321
Sorry, deliberate, but doing leg work for 5 minutes wil not build the strength you need for skiing.

It's like doing wall sits. If you do them for more than a minute, there is no additional benefit. It hurts, for sure, but it doesn't make you stronger.

There is a lot of literature on this.

I think that trainers have to come up with new stuff all the time to attract clients, instead of doing the old boring stuff, like low reps with HEAVY weights, even though this works.
post #304 of 321

if you want to get stronger you have to lift heavy objects, pretty simple.

you may pick and choose whatever "fad" fits your style better.

post #305 of 321

My current workout involves about 2 hours 4-5 days a week in the gym benching, squatting, deadlifting, and overhead pressing heavy along with assistance movements for improving my numbers on those lifts.  I have no idea how much carryover I'm really getting to my skiing fitness and abilities from being able to deadlift 500 pounds, but I enjoy it as a year-round activity in addition to the skiing and biking I do seasonally. 

 

As far as cardio goes, I tend to hope that biking for around 30 minutes a day up hills to get to classes and weekly ski touring or mountain biking should be sufficient to get me to the point where I can throw myself down a mountain for 5 minutes or so before sitting on a lift to get back up and perhaps hike up a little farther beyond that point without dedicating myself to a stricter cardio regime.

post #306 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by breilly View Post

So if that is the way to do it, us city folk could just take the elevator up a tall building, take the stairway down from top floor as fast as we can, repeat. Right?

I use to live in an apartment complex awhile ago that was next to a 7 story parking garage on the other side of the street. I ran up and down those stairs for 90% of my training, 3x per week for 16 months in preparation for a 4 day mountaineering expedition. I was the strongest in the group. I know how to properly and safely train, knee issues were never a problem. I never developed significant downhill ski strength however, probably because I did not focus on bending my knee in excess. I feel that to get the proper mechanics for the ski specific training I am doing now it would be somewhat difficult to incorperate on stairs. Lunges may be a better alternative?

I enjoy lifting weights but I primarily do it to strengthen bone and ligaments to prevent general injury. I have been involved in some pretty bad accidents on the slope where I walked away with little more than cuts and maybe shook up. Just like with hiking, weight lifting has little effect on actual ski strength though for the same reasons stated above for static leg bends. Lunges and downhill exercises would be a better bet. I'll know conclusively when my season starts down here in socal and report back.
post #307 of 321

So I added the "Leg Blaster" exercises to my normal weight routine and it felt OK.. A little tough on my 61 year old knees but I'll work up to it.

 

Then I bent down to pick up the newspaper from the driveway this morning and something went "twang" in my lower back and now I'm practically crippled.

 

What's worse is that my kitchen sink is clogged - I had the whole thing apart when I went outside to get the paper. The house is a disaster and I'm forced to drink beer in front of the TV...

 

I wonder if my wife can do plumbing?

post #308 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

So I added the "Leg Blaster" exercises to my normal weight routine and it felt OK.. A little tough on my 61 year old knees but I'll work up to it.

 

Then I bent down to pick up the newspaper from the driveway this morning and something went "twang" in my lower back and now I'm practically crippled.

 

What's worse is that my kitchen sink is clogged - I had the whole thing apart when I went outside to get the paper. The house is a disaster and I'm forced to drink beer in front of the TV...

 

I wonder if my wife can do plumbing?

Fuller,

 

I am very sorry to hear that! I have to say first off 61 is not that old anymore. Any type of exercise that we are not use to doing needs a fair amount of time to build up to, that goes for all ages. Younger people may on occasion be able to get away with rushing into new routines but the damage is still being done unnoticed. There are many types of knee and lower back injuries to be had for exercises such as skiing, stair climbing, leg blasters, squats, running, etc. The key is understanding how the most common injuries form. Typically, the knee is supported by ligaments and muscle in a neutral position, same goes for the lower back. When these supporting structures fatigue, they allow our posture and knee position to fall out of alignment, causing a plethora of issues including bone grinding and wearing of cartilage, nerve damage, slipped/partial slipped discs, etc. These can develop into chronic conditions and be near unfixable if continued for enough time.

 

Whenever I do a new exercise that taxes my knees and/or lower back, I work into the exercise VERY gradually. My rule of thumb is to spend at least a month working through the motions of the exercise without building fatigue. This is to strengthen all the stabilizer muscules and ligaments necessary to keep those joints in place when our primary muscle groups fatigue. Rock climbers understand this phenomenon well since ligament strengthening of the finger joints is often the limiting performance factor, and there is no shortcut to ligament strengthening. For us skiers the issues are not as visible, and it is easy to forget what parts of our body are saving us from damage, and which parts are getting us down the mountain.

 

Get plenty of rest, lower back pain is awful! This is one of the hidden dangers from following workout advice from articles/videos on the internet.

post #309 of 321

Thanks, I'll be OK with a little R&R. I just hate having to quit my routine.

post #310 of 321
 
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

Then I bent down to pick up the newspaper from the driveway this morning and something went "twang" in my lower back and now I'm practically crippled.

 

A few weeks ago I sat down Sunday morning, all excited to watch the year end tennis final between Federer and Djokovic, when Fed walks out and says he can't play because he strained his back. ( Oh man was I bummed! But probably not as much as Fed. ;-) So you're in good company - that sh*t happens.

 

Oddly enough I went out two days later for a hit with a friend on a cool day and tweaked my own back. Same thing, just bending over to scoop up a ball. Always something silly like that that nails ya!

 

Took me about two weeks for it to completely subside, but I skied five days during that period. Did have a few days immediately after the tweak for things to settle down a bit. FWIW what works for me is 1) do no harm - give it a little time, and don't push things too soon, 2) anytime it gets particularly tight breathe, relax and tell yourself it will be fine, don't go the other way and work yourself into an anxiety frenzy which can really lock that tweak in, 3) go for a lot of walks, move around (not aggressively) and let the body's circulation work its magic, and 4) I find a heating pad on the couch or in bed is really soothing, and helps keep things loose.

 

Mainly just wanted to reinforce you are not alone, and wish you a speedy recovery. This too shall pass.

 

Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

What's worse is that my kitchen sink is clogged - I had the whole thing apart when I went outside to get the paper. The house is a disaster and I'm forced to drink beer in front of the TV...

 

There's a silver ling to every dark cloud!    ;) 

post #311 of 321
Quote:
 I wonder if my wife can do plumbing?

Turns out the answer is no.

 

She got home late last night and the sink is still apart with the trap taken off. The pressurized RO water system drain is slowly leaking into the cabinet so sore back or not we had to fix it. I had a dishpan in the sink which was full of water and being the helpful person that she is she dumped it in the sink.

 

While I was under it looking for the RO shut off.

 

While the trap was taken off.

 

Good thing we both have a sense of humor! The back actually feels better this morning so that's a good thing...

post #312 of 321
 
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

She got home late last night and the sink is still apart with the trap taken off. The pressurized RO water system drain is slowly leaking into the cabinet so sore back or not we had to fix it. I had a dishpan in the sink which was full of water and being the helpful person that she is she dumped it in the sink.

 

While I was under it looking for the RO shut off.

 

While the trap was taken off.

 

Classic! Think I once saw that in a Stooges film!    ;-)

post #313 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wade View Post
 

 

This article / workout addresses that.

 

I've been doing the workout for the last couple of weeks, alternating it with more traditional leg workouts.  So far, so good.

 

http://www.backcountry.com/explore/train-eccentric-leg-strength-for-alpine-skiing

Yeah, I thought that looked promising and decided to give it a try.  After first session was sore as hell as warned.  Second session pulled a groin while doing the lunges.  Great!  That'll get me ready for the upcoming ski trips. 

post #314 of 321

When that groin heals up give this a try.

post #315 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post
 

When that groin heals up give this a try.

LOL!  Maybe in private.

post #316 of 321

Some hiking, but my favorite hiking is around in the northern Maine woods...so it hasn't been high speed/intensity, mostly stretching..and has been coupled with some wading(flyfishing).  Lacked the reps with leg exercises this year....watched more Mountain Monsters than previous year.(lol).  Day #1 is tomorrow so afterwards a more serious schedule will be put into play.

post #317 of 321

I do a lot of hiking and gym exercise that includes lots of stairs.   Hiking....hiked around Mt. Rainier with 44,000 feet of elevation change in 6-days.   I climb a local mountain twice per week so leg strength and cardio I'm in pretty good shape.

 

I've worked on more stretching, hip and lower back exercises at the gym.    I love to work-out so it isn't hard to keep at it.   Eating is my downfall.... I like to eat too.   

post #318 of 321

So I'm going to throw this out there..don't want to preach..but I recently quit drinking cola drinks.  I've had significant decrease in joint pain, and I do mean significant.  It's not coincidence as I've had it for quite a while and have tried many things.  If anyone drinks a lot of cola and has joint pain and can refrain for a few weeks, I'd love to hear if you experience a decrease as well.  I'm really rather shocked..

post #319 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 

So I'm going to throw this out there..don't want to preach..but I recently quit drinking cola drinks.  I've had significant decrease in joint pain, and I do mean significant.  It's not coincidence as I've had it for quite a while and have tried many things.  If anyone drinks a lot of cola and has joint pain and can refrain for a few weeks, I'd love to hear if you experience a decrease as well.  I'm really rather shocked..

Diet or regular?

post #320 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post
 

Diet or regular?


Regular.

post #321 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJQIV View Post
 

Blah, blah, blah, blah... During the off-season you need to be fit and develop good muscle balance. In the preseason, you need to do training that offers closest resemblance to the ways you will dynamically engage your muscles while skiing.

 

What he says sums it up pretty well: http://www.tetongravity.com/story/ski/nick-martinis-favorite-pre-season-training-workouts

 

The imbedded Mountain Athletics training program is pretty close to what I do.

I've been using the iPhone app pretty regularly for about the last 6 weeks as a topper to my pre-season regimen. I like the time efficiency of the app and how with it on the floor in front of me, the rest period count downs don't let me slack off. I got out to Mammoth three weekends ago and my legs are in better shape than in forever. Three days of hitting it very hard with no fatigue or soreness. Now I'm really stoked for the rest of the season.

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