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Tele Skis on the Lift

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Random question I know, but something I have wondered and never seen...

When on a lift, do tele skis just flop around? My thought would be without the attachment at the heel, the skis would just hang from the toe. If that is true, is there any way to control them in the wind, or do they just swing until back on the ground? I have wondered for a long time, but I have never seen a tele person on a lift.
post #2 of 20
First off, you should consider changing ski areas to someplace where there are tele skiers. They are very pleasant and charming, well worth seeking out, especially if you are a single woman.

But to answer your question: carefully placed rubber bands on the boots and bindings solve the problems that you've identified by snugging the boot heel to the ski. The first few turns off the lift pop the rubber bands free, allowing the aesthetic and graceful turns that tele skiing is renowned for world wide. If you do go to resorts that tele skiers frequent you may notice trays of rubber bands placed strategically near lift loading stations - these are for that purpose.

Hope that helps.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

First off, you should consider changing ski areas to someplace where there are tele skiers. They are very pleasant and charming, well worth seeking out, especially if you are a single woman.

But to answer your question: carefully placed rubber bands on the boots and bindings solve the problems that you've identified by snugging the boot heel to the ski. The first few turns off the lift pop the rubber bands free, allowing the aesthetic and graceful turns that tele skiing is renowned for world wide. If you do go to resorts that tele skiers frequent you may notice trays of rubber bands placed strategically near lift loading stations - these are for that purpose.

Hope that helps.
I have seen plenty in the act of skiing, but never caught one on a lift. Tele skiing has always intrigued me, but not something I plan on diving into any time soon. And sorry, no single women here.
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

Random question I know, but something I have wondered and never seen...

When on a lift, do tele skis just flop around? My thought would be without the attachment at the heel, the skis would just hang from the toe. If that is true, is there any way to control them in the wind, or do they just swing until back on the ground? I have wondered for a long time, but I have never seen a tele person on a lift.

They don't ride lifts, they always travel uphill under their own power. Always.

post #5 of 20
I thought they flew?
post #6 of 20
Wow over 20 years Tele skiing and no rubber bands, must be doing something right.
post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by teledance View Post

Wow over 20 years Tele skiing and no rubber bands, must be doing something right.

 

You found a single woman?   Only known answer so far.

post #8 of 20

They simply do not allow people with broken bindings on the lifts    -    Duh. 

post #9 of 20
I like to see them fall. They look like a broken stick man.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post

Random question I know, but something I have wondered and never seen...

When on a lift, do tele skis just flop around? My thought would be without the attachment at the heel, the skis would just hang from the toe. If that is true, is there any way to control them in the wind, or do they just swing until back on the ground? I have wondered for a long time, but I have never seen a tele person on a lift.

My daughter was learning tele last winter.  She said they do hang down but they do not flop around, even if it's windy.  She found when she used her alpine skis after mostly doing tele, the alpine skis felt a lot heavier than before when riding the lift in comparison.

post #11 of 20
I initially thought, how come I don't know the answer to this question? I've ridden the chair with a ton of these guys. Then I realized I always pull the bar down to use the foot rest. So I wouldn't see anything weird about the skis dangling. On top of that we allow uphill travel here.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I initially thought, how come I don't know the answer to this question? I've ridden the chair with a ton of these guys. Then I realized I always pull the bar down to use the foot rest. So I wouldn't see anything weird about the skis dangling. On top of that we allow uphill travel here.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gmoney View Post
 My thought would be without the attachment at the heel, the skis would just hang from the toe. If that is true, is there any way to control them in the wind, or do they just swing until back on the ground?

 

 

Have you figured out why they don't flop around yet, even without the lift bar?


Part 1:    Take a ruler and hold it between thumb and forefinger.   Except hold it not quite in the middle, make the part away from your hand longer than the part under your palm.    Does the part under your palm flop towards the ground?

 

Part 2:  Have a look at the front of a teleboot.   See the bellows there?    Every part of the boot in front of those bellows stays attached to the ski at a constant distance, no matter what.   If it doesn't, the binding is bad.   Therefore in order for the tail to flop, the bellows need to be compressed.

 

So, yes, it would be easy to make a flopping ski by mounting the binding to or ahead of the balance point (where shovel and tail are equal) and by making the bellows of the boot have a compression resistance comparable to tissue paper.     Except no one does that because doing either one of those things makes the ski and the boot bad for their skiing purpose.

post #13 of 20
Clearly if either of us had ever spent time looking at a tele boot and binding we would know the answer, but we're not tele skiers so we've never cared enough to look. But I would think there would be some noticable droop behind the heel?
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Clearly if either of us had ever spent time looking at a tele boot and binding we would know the answer, but we're not tele skiers so we've never cared enough to look. But I would think there would be some noticable droop behind the heel?

Noticeable depends on how hard you look, and how "active" the bindings are. Tele bindings with firm springs, like Hammerheads and NTN, have pretty much zero droop. Bindings with firm springs are pretty popular these days. And as cantunamunch pointed out, most tele bindings are mounted near the ski's balance point, which also works to eliminate droop.

Now I'm outed with an informative answer. nonono2.gif In a way, I guess I'll miss summer.
post #15 of 20

Wow .... way to ruin a thread with facts and common sense. 

post #16 of 20
I know. All i can say is that I'm in kind of a bad mood.
post #17 of 20

The best thing about tele bindings is that it's harder to put the skis on backwards than with alpine gear.

post #18 of 20

Telewife says they don't flop. They're fine. You can stretch your hamstrings.

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

The best thing about tele bindings is that it's harder to put the skis on backwards than with alpine gear.

 

 

Well done, Sir!!  Keep up the good work!

post #20 of 20

^^^Last season I saw a drunk lady try do that in the lift line while arguing with the people behind me that she had just cut line in front of.. Hilarious!  

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