or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone Using the Wintersteiger Discman Ceramic Edge Finisher?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Anyone Using the Wintersteiger Discman Ceramic Edge Finisher?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I've got two U12s and one U14, and I race in a beer league.  That can mean 7+ tunes per week.  Another local race dad swears by the Discman.  He says it's not only quicker but also easier to get a good result.  And he thinks the result is more durable, ie they stay sharper longer.  

 

I still consider myself a beginner at tuning, and mostly learned from these forums, some youtube videos, and personal sessions (one with fellow bear SMJ--thanks!).  I do enjoy tuning, but have 2 concerns: 1. I have very little time and 2. I recently pulled my right neck and shoulder pretty badly and if I don't heal quickly tuning could be very painful.  

 

Luckily I've got 2 other parents considering equal shares, which would be about $280 each.

 

Regarding the Discman Ceramic Edge Tuner:

 

1.  Does it save that much time and pain?  I presume I still need to finish the edge with a 600 stone, correct?

2.  Is the learning curve very steep? Is it dangerous? Do I need a mask?

3.  For someone with just a couple of years' tuning experience, will it be easier to get a better tune?  (I know, impossible to judge.)

4.  Is the result more durable?  And if so, is a harder edge a bad thing?

5.  Is a rotobrush a better bang for the buck to save time (and my right shoulder)?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 14

Wow hr, your kids are growing up fast, I'll never forget skiing with two of them and trying to get them to start using their poles!  Sorry about your neck and shoulder.  Nothing to say about the Discman except a guess that it would be better and faster, but you're still holding a (heavier) tool and moving it around, so easier on your body, I don't know.

post #3 of 14
I think SMJ is right. Speaking as someone with two wrists broken a few years back, the work is not in the edge tuning, the work is in the scraping and brushing. Lots of reps on those. Get rotobrushes. Much better bang for the buck.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I think SMJ is right. Speaking as someone with two wrists broken a few years back, the work is not in the edge tuning, the work is in the scraping and brushing. Lots of reps on those. Get rotobrushes. Much better bang for the buck.

Really, edge tuning takes plenty of work.

 

Why would it be either, or, You should have rotos also!

post #5 of 14

don't bother with the Discman, very easy to completely screw up an edge with , especially if you don't have a really steady hand !  Seen quite a few examples of it.

 

OTOH (and as i found out last year!) a good edger can really work well and give you a consistent quality edge more quickly.   However you will be spending more than the ~$800 for the disc man.  

 

Take a look at the Protek grinder - (~$1500).  It is very similar to the snow glide but easier to set up and use based upon my experience, .  Unlike the disc man it is not dependent on the steady hand.  It sits on the base and you run it along the base so it is consistent and just easier to use.

 

Yes, I typically finish off with a stone but that is only a couple of passes.  When you are doing a lot of skis the grinder saves a lot of effort

 

And yes, follow up with the roto brushes

post #6 of 14

http://www.verdonkracing.com/

 

this is the other one I have heard is good!

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Great suggestions as usual.  The Protek and Snowglide look very interesting but I doubt my buddies can stomach $500 apiece.  May need to suck in some more race parents.

post #8 of 14
The disc man can put a sharp edge on fast, but as ScotsSkier said can trash an edge in a hurry. I used one for half a season 5 years ago and sold it because it was so fickle. The problem is all the weight in the battery at the top of the tool, with only a tiny contact guide running along the base. Also, its pretty rough, so you'll want the polishing wheel also, or plan on stones after. You should be able to find them really cheap as they were on closeout last year. If you can find the purple Euro version it has an updated design that is more stable and works better.

I used a Protek most of last season and it works well once skis are properly setup. The first time though can take 10-20 passes before you're getting a consistent edge.
post #9 of 14
Here's one on craigslist. Asking $600. Usually the used ones go for $4-500 on eBay.

http://newlondon.craigslist.org/spo/4621010404.html
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hearing these opinions, and looking at the videos, we're now thinking Protek vs Snowglide. Can anyone compare the Protek vs the $1700 version of Verdonk Snowglide?

post #11 of 14

I haven't tried the $1700 snow glide.  One of our local top race  tuners here uses the more expensive Snow glide and when he looked at my Protek reckoned it was easier to set up accurately.

 

If you are thinking about the ProTek, call Sean at ProTek racing and he will be able to give you independent references from users.  Since you are in MA he may be able to point you at someone local to you that uses it.  I checked out with a few users before i pulled the trigger.  Mine was the first one in the West Coast and Smoothrides tried  mine before buying (he is also a Pro tuner)

post #12 of 14

I tried the Fogman last year and am probably going to get one. The owner of Edgewise (Stowe,VT) uses one on his own skis. They sure do come out sharp and there isn't really any other finish work. It's just grind and go. Also, the discs seem to last a long time. You will probably get multiple seasons out of one (or so I am told).

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

Hearing these opinions, and looking at the videos, we're now thinking Protek vs Snowglide. Can anyone compare the Protek vs the $1700 version of Verdonk Snowglide?


The big difference is that the $1700 Snowglide has fixed bevel angles, so if they are off at all you'll have to live with it or figure out how to recalibrate the tool. The Snowglide is also lighter which is nice. The Protek is adjustable to hundredths of a degree, so its easily calibrated. Performance will be comparable with either tool.

Have not seen the Fogman until just now, looks like a Trione.
post #14 of 14

Anybody still using these and can comment on Protek vs Snowglide? Or the use of these machines for multiple seasons?

 

I'm liking that very little edge is taken off vs. hand files, but more importantly is the speed of getting the edge sharpened and ready to ski.  Right now, hand files (2nd cut to fine) and then stones (mutiple grits) with ceramic stone finish certainly takes some time.  Looks like this can eliminate a HUGE amount of time for me.

 

How long does a wheel last and are most going with a fine stone finish?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Anyone Using the Wintersteiger Discman Ceramic Edge Finisher?