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How to Roast a Marshmallow - By the US Forest Service.

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Don't know whether to post this here or in Politics and Hot Topics.  However, it's so "funny" it's sick.

 

For the record, my parents and sisters taught me the correct way to roast marshmallows.  I learned through experience that they will burn quite nicely.  :D

 

What's next an approved list of where to get supplies to make a Smores?  Watch out for Mr. Ranger.  He'll be measuring your roasting sticks from now on.

 

Quote:
 

US Forest Service Asks: How Does Your Marshmallow Roast?

Posted by Kathryn Sosbe, Office of Communication, U.S. Forest Service, on August 29, 2014 at 1:00 PM
S’mores, a treat whose recipe first appeared in the 1927 Girl Scouts Handbook, is a staple of National Roasted Marshmallow Day (Aug. 30). (Think Stock/Getty Images)

S’mores, a treat whose recipe first appeared in the 1927 Girl Scouts Handbook, is a staple of National Roasted Marshmallow Day (Aug. 30). (Think Stock/Getty Images)

 

Some wonderful memories are born around a fire ring. But whether you are camping, “glamping” or sitting with friends and family in your backyard, waning evenings typically include one campfire staple: marshmallows.

 

So, on the eve of National Roasted Marshmallow Day (Aug. 30), we pay tribute to the sweet ingredient that makes any form of outdoor gathering, well, sweeter.

For some, the best use of marshmallows is as the gooey main ingredient of s’mores. Take a graham cracker, place a section of chocolate on it, and then carefully place a freshly roasted marshmallow on top of the candy bar. Top the marshmallow off with another graham cracker, carefully squeezing the campfire dessert sandwich together as the hot marshmallow melts the chocolate.

 

According to the National Confectioners Association, the history of s’mores is anyone’s guess. However, the s’more recipe is first found in the 1927 Girl Scouts Handbook and some people speculate the organization coined the name.

 

But as many national forests and grasslands visitors know, there is more than one way to roast a marshmallow.

 

First, let’s talk safety. Never start a campfire when there are fire restrictions in place. The restrictions are put in place for your safety and for the safety of others. If campfires are allowed, use an existing fire ring or pit. Be sure you are at least 15 feet from tent walls, trees or other flammable objects.

 

Most importantly, ensure you work closely with children and talk to them about fire danger, proper behavior and rules – then expect nothing less. No one knows how many children are burned in campfire incidents; however, you don’t need statistics to know precaution is a key to great camping experiences. Some experts advocate a 10-foot rule between young children and a campfire. For more information about campfire safety, let Smokey Bear guide you.

 

Madelyn Morrissey (left) and Katie Roth roast marshmallows near the George Washington/Jefferson National Forest. (Courtesy Adrian Roth)

Madelyn Morrissey (left) and Katie Roth roast marshmallows near the George Washington/Jefferson National Forest. (Courtesy Adrian Roth)

 

Now, let’s get to the marshmallow basics. Use a roasting stick of at least 30 inches in length. The degree a marshmallow is roasted runs the gamut, from the barely cooked, light caramel-colored outer layer to the flaming marshmallow that contains a gooey interior wrapped by a crispy, blackened shell. From there, most people graduate to s’mores and rarely move on.

 

But there are some innovative ways to roast the little white treats that can help cut down on the amount of sugar intake by the kids, thus making bedtime a little more doable.

Think fruit.

 

Even if the kids – including us older ones – insist on more traditional s’mores, there are some healthy tricks. Grill thin slices of pineapple and substitute chocolate for the sweet, warm fruit. You will still get a tasty treat but by substituting with fruit, it is healthier – as long as you watch the amount of marshmallows used. If you want to cut down even more on calories, try using slices of angel food cake instead of graham crackers.

 

You can also get a little inventive and move away from s’mores.

 

Grab a small bag of chocolate or peanut butter chips – or a combination of the two. Take a banana and slice one side open, exposing the fruit but leaving the peel intact. Slice the banana, add a few chocolate chips then top with tiny marshmallows. Or substitute the chips for blueberries from the local farmer’s market. Place the banana in aluminum foil and wrap tightly. Place the foil-wrapped fruit next to but not on the flames. Wait five to 10 minutes or enough time for the chips and marshmallows to melt. Open and enjoy with a spoon.

Another way to limit the amount of marshmallows used is to substitute them with marshmallow crème, a spreadable version of marshmallows that helps you more easily regulate portion. For healthier treats, use large strawberries, apple slices, banana chucks, pineapple or other fruit. Put a piece of fruit on a roasting stick, dip quickly in the crème and roast over indirect heat until a delicious golden brown. You’re still having campfire fun, but the focus is on a healthier evening snack.

 

There are many ways to make the end of your camping day a memorable time with snacks. How does your marshmallow roast?

 

Madelyn Morrissey blows on a roasted marshmallow near the George Washington/Jefferson National Forest. (Courtesy Adrian Roth)

Madelyn Morrissey blows on a roasted marshmallow near the George Washington/Jefferson National Forest. (Courtesy Adrian Roth)

 

Remember to only use a stick that is at least 30 inches long.  Not 29.999 those are extremely dangerous.  I'm surprised that they didn't outline not to use poison ivy branches for this.  They also missed the warning that too many marshmallows can lead to diabetes.  But I digress.

 

And to think, we paid several Government workers a very high salary to write something that most kids know how to do.

 

Well, welcome to it.

post #2 of 14
The government isn't allowed to contract a fluff (intended pun) piece for National Marshmallow Day? Frankly, I'm more concerned that multiple legislators passed a bill to CREATE National Marshmallow Day.
post #3 of 14

In the same article that implores children to remain 10 feet away from a campfire, there are photos of little girls standing a mere 3 feet away from an open grill fire and holding a flaming torch of a marshmallow a mere 1 foot from her face!!!

 

That is some seriously irresponsible and death-defying imagery there!  I'm writing the Forest Service in outrage.  I wonder if those poor girls are still with us???

post #4 of 14

Angel food cake, pineapple, and marshmallows?  Ugh.  That's not a s'more, it's a travesty.  What is this country coming to?


Edited by Posaune - 8/30/14 at 7:48pm
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

Angel food cake, pineapple, and marshmallows?  Ugh.  That's not a 'smore, it's a travesty.  What is this country coming to?

 

Nothing like a government bureaucrat to take the fun out of fun...

post #6 of 14

Glad they cleared that up, since I used stuck my finger in the marshmallow and put it over the fire to toast it. To think that's what was causing my 3rd degree burns all these years.

post #7 of 14


AND - All this information was the result of a 1.3 million dollar grant.

post #8 of 14
Near as I can tell, the author's job is writing stuff for a government publication.

I'm guessing she gets a government salary to come into work every day whether the topic of the article is marshmallows or salmon, the origin of Smoky the Bear, Get Outdoors Day, or whatever else is going to snag readership. http://www.fs.fed.us/gsearch/Kathryn%2BSosbe%252C%2BOffice%2Bof%2BCommunication%252C%2BU.S.%2BForest%2BService
post #9 of 14

First :ROTF.

 

But remember this are same people that spend $1000.00 for a toilet seat, to provide laughter for the rest of the world.

 

Why?.... :popcorn.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by T-Square View Post
 

Don't know whether to post this here or in Politics and Hot Topics.  However, it's so "funny" it's sick.

 

For the record, my parents and sisters taught me the correct way to roast marshmallows.  I learned through experience that they will burn quite nicely.  :D

 

What's next an approved list of where to get supplies to make a Smores?  Watch out for Mr. Ranger.  He'll be measuring your roasting sticks from now on.

 

Quote:
 

 

Most importantly, ensure you work closely with children and talk to them about fire danger, proper behavior and rules – then expect nothing less. No one knows how many children are burned in campfire incidents; however, you don’t need statistics to know precaution is a key to great camping experiences. Some experts advocate a 10-foot rule between young children and a campfire.

 

Remember to only use a stick that is at least 30 inches long.  Not 29.999 those are extremely dangerous.  I'm surprised that they didn't outline not to use poison ivy branches for this.  They also missed the warning that too many marshmallows can lead to diabetes.  But I digress.

 

And to think, we paid several Government workers a very high salary to write something that most kids know how to do.

 

Well, welcome to it.

I disagree with those experts; there's nothing like a 2nd degree burn on a kid's foot to teach him to be careful around fire.   I would draw the line at letting the kids throw gasoline on the fire.:D

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

I disagree with those experts; there's nothing like a 2nd degree burn on a kid's foot to teach him to be careful around fire.   I would draw the line at letting the kids throw gasoline on the fire.:D

 

 

You live in the Great White North where kids learn to wrestle wild wolves for fun.  We, on the other hand, live in a nanny state where it's considered child abuse to let your kid leave the house, even to go into the back yard, without immediate adult supervision.

 

I'm glad that my mom agreed with you, even though I was cut, bruised, and burned from time to time.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

 

You live in the Great White North where kids learn to wrestle wild wolves for fun.  We, on the other hand, live in a nanny state where it's considered child abuse to let your kid leave the house, even to go into the back yard, without immediate adult supervision.

 

I'm glad that my mom agreed with you, even though I was cut, bruised, and burned from time to time.


I think that depends on what state you live in.  In Florida we saw kids slide down water slides standing up and backwards.  Yes and injury occurred, and no one batted an eye.   In the Bronx kids get to play with guns.

 

BTW, yes, we let them wrestle wolves as it falls under the "its ok if you pick it up and eat before five seconds or before the wolf eats it first" rule.  Teaches the kids to be fast, tough and helps boast he immune system.

 

;)

post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Near as I can tell, the author's job is writing stuff for a government publication.

I'm guessing she gets a government salary to come into work every day whether the topic of the article is marshmallows or salmon, the origin of Smoky the Bear, Get Outdoors Day, or whatever else is going to snag readership. http://www.fs.fed.us/gsearch/Kathryn%2BSosbe%252C%2BOffice%2Bof%2BCommunication%252C%2BU.S.%2BForest%2BService

 

 

Anyone take the time to read Sosbe's expertise and skills ?   Pretty damn broad and diverse for a Dept of Agric. employee.    The key is she is a community outreach expert.  That sort of sums up the BS part of her resume.  And  reputation management ?   Oh boy I am really impressed - sort of explains what is wrong with our government.

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
And  reputation management ?   Oh boy I am really impressed - sort of explains what is wrong with our government.

 

There's something wrong with our government???  

:confused 

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