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Newbie Gear Questions (Skis & Bindings)

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've been lurking the forums for a few days, but I haven't really found the answer I needed.  I started skiing near the end of last season and enjoyed myself so much that I need some good gear (long term).  The group of people I go with are in the green/blue range with a few people in the diamond area.  My best friend purchased Line Influence 105's with Salomon sth 12 and absolutely love them.  I'd like to get a pair of those too, but they're either out of stock, don't have my size, or just plain ridiculously expensive.

 

I'm 6'3", 260lbs, starting to do blue runs and will probably be off groomers shorty.

 

What would the pros here recommend for skis and bindings?

 

Thanks for all your help!

post #2 of 11

I just nipped over to the boot forum to see if you had posted there.

 

Boots matter much more than skis. Look around for boots that you like BUT only buy from somewhere you can go back to AND make sure they have a good boot fitter.

 

If you were skiing for a week go into a shop on site, explain what you are looking for and they may be accommodating on trying out different boots and offsetting the rental against your final purchase. I am a big guy with wide feet and high arches. Choosing the right type of boot then getting them fitting perfectly took several visits and they reshaped the shell and modified the liner. That time and money was the best investment I made in my skiing life.

 

Now I am going to be a little rude to you. It is extremely unlikely that you will ski well enough at this stage to get the most out of ANY ski you buy never mind something described as Big, bad and stiff. Sure you will get style and street cred points when you turn up on them but you would enjoy yourself more and progress faster on something softer and easier to turn.

 

Now I am not go to be specific on boots or skis I am hopelessly out of touch with current models, but will emphasize again that boots matter more than skis and those could be a little stiffer and technically better than you need but buy a pair of light not to stiff and easy turning skis, you will have more fun and learn faster.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your reply and I agree that boots are more important.  That being said, I've already purchased a pair from my local ski shop in April.  They did a great job and fitted it perfectly to my feet.  I'd go back there and ask for advice, but they're closed for the summer.

 

I know I'm not advanced enough to take advantage of all the features of new skis, but I was hoping to future proof myself.  I don't make a ton of money and want to plan ahead and purchase skis that I can grow in.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by TQA View Post
 

I just nipped over to the boot forum to see if you had posted there.

 

Boots matter much more than skis. Look around for boots that you like BUT only buy from somewhere you can go back to AND make sure they have a good boot fitter.

 

If you were skiing for a week go into a shop on site, explain what you are looking for and they may be accommodating on trying out different boots and offsetting the rental against your final purchase. I am a big guy with wide feet and high arches. Choosing the right type of boot then getting them fitting perfectly took several visits and they reshaped the shell and modified the liner. That time and money was the best investment I made in my skiing life.

 

Now I am going to be a little rude to you. It is extremely unlikely that you will ski well enough at this stage to get the most out of ANY ski you buy never mind something described as Big, bad and stiff. Sure you will get style and street cred points when you turn up on them but you would enjoy yourself more and progress faster on something softer and easier to turn.

 

Now I am not go to be specific on boots or skis I am hopelessly out of touch with current models, but will emphasize again that boots matter more than skis and those could be a little stiffer and technically better than you need but buy a pair of light not to stiff and easy turning skis, you will have more fun and learn faster.

post #4 of 11
You are a big unit.
I'm 6'3" and 220. I say that because you should be wary of advice from small people.
Anyway, based on your brief description, I would reach in to my ski cupboard and put you on my Ninthward THA's.
These are a very versatile all mountain ski for a big fella. Incredible value for money from Levelnine sports. Don't pay too much attention to L9's written blurb about them being a big mountain charger. They are much more forgiving than my Volkl Mantras ( another good choice for heavy/powerful guys)

I have better hard snow skis and better powder skis but the Ninthwards are great all rounders. I'm lending mine to a mate for his first trip to Japan. He is 6'+/220lbs/ intermediate with minimal technical finesse.
My advice, don't spend a fortune on your first pair of skis.
Cheers
post #5 of 11
Jackel said:
Quote:
I was hoping to future proof myself.

I sympathize with budget skiing, but although you may advance relatively quickly, you won't do as well if you have to fight with your skis, and some skis are quite demanding. Struggling with very advanced equipment can drill in some bad habits and add challenges to learning the fundamentals you need to be a versatile skier. So get something that you'll enjoy but will make skiing accessible.

However, stick around and you'll learn some nice tricks for buying cheap. I've yet to pay more than $420 or so for skis, largely by sticking to a previous year's version of the same exact model but with a different topsheet or keeping a keen eye out for a big discount on skis I've demoed and know I want--like $250 for one year old Volkl Kenjas (in October) and $200 for three year old Salomon Shoguns (in February). Both were crazy clearance markdowns, but IME it's common to find skis that were marked at $800 for full retail selling for $400 or $450 at the end of the season. I think the same kind of ratios apply to the really pricey brands, but you'll have to get that from those who know.

OTOH, a few Marches ago I paid full retail for the just-released following year's boots with not a discount in sight for fitting or anything else and limited follow-up fitting. I haven't regretted a single penny of it.
post #6 of 11

Good advise all around. But if you want to grow into any ski, make sure that you take some lessons as well. Just being on the snow isn't enough to get the most out of that ski that's gonna be great for you in a few trips time.

 

Spend your money on lessons and rent different ski models (if you can), perhaps even the ones that will be suggested in this thread. At the end of next season, when you've had some lessons and skied a few different models, you know what YOU like and you can get crazy deals in May or so.

 

That's what would be my plan.

 

So, jusk ask for rent/demo suggestions for this winter. I find it difficult to suggest anything for someone outside my own height/weight range. But others might.

post #7 of 11

Boots tick.

 

Ski rental for intermediate all mountain will be 20 - 30 $ a day

 

How many days do you think you will ski?

 

if less than 10 then renting makes sense.

 

10 to 20 days you have the hassle of ski carriage and maybe extra baggage costs if you fly.so maybe rent but maybe buy

 

If 20 or more I would buy a pair of last years skis. Check out the used ski places like this http://www.2ndtracks.com/products.php?cat=257

You should find brand new skis with new bindings for $250 or very lightly used one year old skis for $200.quite easily.

 

You want all mountain intermediate skis at 175 to 182 cm. At the end of the year maybe demo some more advanced skis and keep these for rock hopping days.

 

Don't let anyone tell you, you have to buy XYZs. At your level you could do a blind test on that type from all the major manufacturers and they will all feel the same to you.

 

Spend the money you save on lessons. Some people learn well in classes but most will do better with one on one lessons. They will really help you progress.

post #8 of 11
Agree with most of TQA's post except, At 6' + and 260 lbs, 175 intermediate skis would be like skiing with pool noodles on your feet. My 6' 17 yo intermediate daughter is on 178 twinnies but she definitely isn't 260 lbs.
post #9 of 11

Things are closed down for the summer.


For the OP, it sounds like you were frustrated to not find the ski you already tried out.  Don't panic.

When shops open up and start taking in new inventory they will need to move out the old stuff.

Prices will stay the same or drop.  

You aren't looking for a specific ski, so if a particular hot model actually sells out, you won't be heartbroken for missing out.

 

Get your research in, but don't panic!

post #10 of 11

 An advancing intermediate will have moments (read mistakes) where the ski is under a lot more stress and flexion than what a finesse skier would produce, so at 260lbs. the OP needs a strong stiff ski. Look for something with a metal layer or 2 and a wood core.

 

Rent before you buy. Some ski rental shops will allow 2 days of rental $ to be applied to the purchase price of skis including used skis.

 

Some ski companies build 2 different looking skis that are actually identical skis for men and women just with different graphics. Stay away from these models as they are built for light weight men/average weight woman, not for someone who is 260lbs.

post #11 of 11
Depends on where youre skiing and what parts of the mountain you want to play on. Definitely need something with metal in it to givr you stability and not feel soft. The k2 amp rictor 90xti draws from k2's front side and free ride tech and is a great all around ski for most conditions. It's 90mm wide sold flat or with binding and it has perforated metal in it to give it strength yet stay forgiving so it can be skied from the intermediate stage to expert. Demo it because even then it might be too forgiving. K2 is big company and hasn't made a ton of changes to this ski (hasnt had to its awesome) so you might be able to find an older model fairly cheap. If you need wider the new mantra is more forgiving than previous models and it rips.
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