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SKI RECOMMENDATION - STORMRIDER 95 OR DPS CASSIAR 95 OR NEW (2014) MANTRA

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I would like to get a new ski..below you will find my summary of skiing and what i am looking for 

My list is really long not just covering mentioned brands, like: Dynastar powertrack 89, Cham high m. 97, Sick Day 95, RMU, RAMP Woodpaker, etc etc 

I am 181cm / 75kg. I am 33 years old. 

I am skiing from my 6-7 years old until 18. Then I start snowboarding (freeride) until 5 years ago when I got back skiing.

In the past I skied mostly on skis up to 80-85mm and I would like to try something wider now. But ...

... the problem are usually snow conditions here in Slovenia (last year not a good year for pow). So I would ski let say 70% groomers / 30% offpiste but it could be also way arround if there is a lot of pow. I usually take ski resorts to ski and then go off piste if there are chances to do it and back on piste to carve more.

It would be great if the ski would be light as possible but still strong on hold to enable me to carve with control and not to much effort to do it. I am not really strong skier but I can push in turns if needed. So actually looking for great intermediate / advanced / a little expert ski which can hold all this.  In the end i would like to enjoy skiing and not work to much during all day. Some skis are really demanding (it could be top shit stuff really) but after a whole day you do not want to try them again the next day if you know what I mean.

So my goal is to find 90-100 ski which can carve and handle all conditions just right (ice, pow, soft snow)... I know this are demands from all customers really but would like to find that sweet spot as much as possible.

What is even more confusing that some manufacturers state 100mm ski as short radious ski (17-19) and maybe others few meters more. And for example some manufactures states that 100mm is carving ski but other says it is more pow ski already. So it is really confusing to read manufacturer data all day long  and picking "perfect" ski

I have a really long list of skis which are int he game currently from most known manufactures to indie skis usually made in USA.

Please give me your feedback what I should looking for expecially what type of ski: full rocker, early tip, how much of each, what combination of materials like metal alu carbon etc...

Thanks!

post #2 of 16

Forget what ski makers pu on their websites, just look at the numbers for reference.

 

I think you would very much like the Fischer Motive 86. Take the 182. I think you can find a nice deal on last year's model, or you can spend a bit more on the 14-15 model (slightly improved version). Maybe a bit narrower than you want, but I think it's a great 70/30 ski for most European regions.

 

Also, have a look at the Nordice Steadfast. Nordica is replacing it with the Nrgy 90 for next season, but there are still some Steadfasts around.

post #3 of 16
The power track is a good ski but not a huge fan of the cham. The wider models are great in pow but you have zero edge hold on hard snow. The steadfast or nrgy would be a great option. Nrgy 90 is the best ski of 14/15. The rocker they used in the old steadfast was slight so it tends to get divey when you're in the soft snow and woods. They put a wider diamond shaped tip in the nrgy with more rocker so you float better. They also added a metal torsion bridge that is widest tip and tail but tapers as you get closer to the binding to give you stability without the weight. Worth every penny they're a blast.
post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonleonbst View Post

The power track is a good ski but not a huge fan of the cham. The wider models are great in pow but you have zero edge hold on hard snow. The steadfast or nrgy would be a great option. Nrgy 90 is the best ski of 14/15. The rocker they used in the old steadfast was slight so it tends to get divey when you're in the soft snow and woods. They put a wider diamond shaped tip in the nrgy with more rocker so you float better. They also added a metal torsion bridge that is widest tip and tail but tapers as you get closer to the binding to give you stability without the weight. Worth every penny they're a blast.

I experienced the Steadfast dive, but can't wait to try the Nrgy skis. So if this is the ski you choose, go 14/15, not earlier. (13/14 a good ski other than the occasional variable snow/pow dive).

post #5 of 16
I agree with the Fischer Motive 86 recommendation, also I thought Fischer was coming out with a Motive 95.

Stormrider 95 is a superb ski. They are more expensive than most skis in North America, not sure how that compares in Slovenia.

Speaking of Slovenia, Élan makes fine skis, look at the Amphibio 88 for a 70/30 frontside/off-piste ski or the new Spectrum 95 for more of a Freeride ski.
post #6 of 16

Stormrider 95 hands down . . . i've bought them last winter and it is a superb ski, super stable at speed and on groomers and great flex. The more you charge the more the ski respond . . 

post #7 of 16

Blizzard Brahma 180cm

 

It is very compliant and easy to ski but will carve a trench if you push it.

post #8 of 16

He's a touch light for a Brahma, unless he wants to go short, which will be a problem off-piste, and he asked about skis in the 90's. Cayzi, at your size, your location, and just getting back into wider skis, I'd go demo these: Kastle FX94, Line Supernatural 92, Head REV90, Atomic Vantage Theory, Rossignol Sin 7. There's a range of constructions and feels here, but all share on-off piste versatility, intermediate through advanced applicability, and the ability to handle european snow conditions, which can get fairly bumpy between storms. Of these, the FX94's will be the most demanding, have the highest envelope, and will be by far the most $$), the Rev90 and Sin 7 will be the easiest to master right away, the Supernatural will be the best jack-of-all-trades, and the Theory and Sin 7 will be the best soft snow and bump skis. But they all would work well for your needs, and will all be fun, which is a quality we sometimes ignore here at Epic.

 

 

BTW, what's interesting to do in Maribor?

post #9 of 16
Brahma is a great ski its stiff and little more naturally aggressive than the nrgy. The nrgy will accept your lazy end of day input while the Brahma will not put up with jello legs. The sin 7 is a super playful ski you can't go wrong with that one. Soul 7 stole a lot of press from the sin 7 which is a damn good ski in its own right. Last year's is great but the 14/15 version gets the soul 7 air tip. Performance is the exact same.
post #10 of 16
I'm the same size/weight as the op but 20 years older. I demoed the 180cm Brahma and found it almost too easy/versatile. I definitely wouldn't call it too stiff or aggressive.

If he is considering it, he might want to set up a demo and ski it back to back with the Bushwacker which I have not tried.
post #11 of 16
The Brahma is definitely not too stiff just stiffer than the nrgy and will do more with an aggressive output whereas the nrgy is a little more playful. The Brahma would be a solid choice.
post #12 of 16

OP states "I am not really a strong skier" so maybe the Rossi E88 would be a candidate?

 

The Stormrider 95 and Brahma are phenomenal skis, but they do tend to suit a fairly strong expert that prefers speed.

post #13 of 16
The older models of the 88 yes. They changed it up this year and made it a ton stiffer to work with the air tip (which they should've just left in their soul series and not brought to the experience line). Last yrs is the better ski and more on level of Brahma etc.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

thanks everyone for tips.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cayzi View Post
 

I would like to get a new ski. 

I am 181cm / 75kg. I am 33 years old. 


In the past I skied mostly on skis up to 80-85mm and I would like to try something wider now. But ...

... the problem are usually snow conditions here in Slovenia (last year not a good year for pow). So I would ski let say 70% groomers / 30% offpiste but it could be also way arround if there is a lot of pow. I usually take ski resorts to ski and then go off piste if there are chances to do it and back on piste to carve more.

It would be great if the ski would be light as possible but still strong on hold to enable me to carve with control and not to much effort to do it. I am not really strong skier but I can push in turns if needed. So actually looking for great intermediate / advanced / a little expert ski which can hold all this.  In the end i would like to enjoy skiing and not work to much during all day. Some skis are really demanding (it could be top shit stuff really) but after a whole day you do not want to try them again the next day if you know what I mean.

So my goal is to find 90-100 ski which can carve and handle all conditions just right (ice, pow, soft snow)... I know this are demands from all customers really but would like to find that sweet spot as much as possible.

 

Haven't tried the Brahma, but have tried the Bonafide (98) and the Bushwacker (87?).  I'm too light in weight for the Bonafide (5'10"/174 cm, 145 lbs/~66kg), and maybe the Brahma, but the Bushwacker is mostly an intermediate smear machine, kinda fun if you don't use an edge much or would like such a change of pace.

I've heard ~165 lbs. (75kg) is the point where the Blizzards become good, a balance of edge and smear.  Depends on the skier. Not for me. 

 

To me the Stocklis (incl. the 95 Stormriders) are maybe the best skis out there, albeit more expensive, and more advanced/expert oriented, so probably a no, but worth mentioning:  "still strong on hold to enable me to carve with control and not too much effort to do it." Yes. They have a very consistent, super edge feel for those who like to use their edges mostly--fast or slow; and yet are damp and relaxing, easy on the body, if you are used to holding an edge, or want to get to that: no chatter, deflections, jetting, unreliability, just trustworthy, smooth, fun.

They are not much of a smear ski, though this is fairly easy on them too, with practice maybe. 

 

I have Stockli xxls (80cm), which are my favorite frontside ski for now. Pretty good off piste too (though not much in powder), because the edgehold is so consistent and reliable in variable snow--great in crud! You can relax!  Easy to hold an edge. 

 

The Stockli SR 95s would include most of the capabilities of my ski plus the ability to handle powder fairly well (though not like a fatter ski). Also, from what I hear, the new SRs have softer flex, and so are better in bumps and easier to ski generally. But they are not light weight. 

 

Given your wants, I would reject the Mantra, by the way, unless the new one is radically different. The tail is stiff (a jet in bumps); the ski lacks dampness. The definition of demanding. Not sure the '15 version will improve all this enough. 

 

List(s) posted above by  beyond View Post and added to by neonleonbst View Post are spectacular, IMHO.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

He's a touch light for a Brahma, unless he wants to go short, which will be a problem off-piste, and he asked about skis in the 90's. Cayzi, at your size, your location, and just getting back into wider skis, I'd go demo these: Kastle FX94, Line Supernatural 92, Head REV90, Atomic Vantage Theory, Rossignol Sin 7. There's a range of constructions and feels here, but all share on-off piste versatility, intermediate through advanced applicability, and the ability to handle european snow conditions, which can get fairly bumpy between storms. Of these, the FX94's will be the most demanding, have the highest envelope, and will be by far the most $$), the Rev90 and Sin 7 will be the easiest to master right away, the Supernatural will be the best jack-of-all-trades, and the Theory and Sin 7 will be the best soft snow and bump skis. But they all would work well for your needs, and will all be fun, which is a quality we sometimes ignore here at Epic.

 

But I'd guess a few of these skis would not be so great on ice, or true hardpan/boilerplate, like Europe--and the East Coast--get. (Head REV90?, Sin7?)

The laid back fun of the Sin7 might make up for any ice weakness. Good Luck. :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by neonleonbst View Post

Brahma is a great ski its stiff and little more naturally aggressive than the nrgy. The nrgy will accept your lazy end of day input while the Brahma will not put up with jello legs. The sin 7 is a super playful ski you can't go wrong with that one. Soul 7 stole a lot of press from the sin 7 which is a damn good ski in its own right. Last year's is great but the 14/15 version gets the soul 7 air tip. Performance is the exact same.
post #16 of 16
True the sin 7 is 98mm underfoot with a light poplar wood core without metal so it will still handle hard days well but not so much on boilerplate. So playful though and it more than makes up for it in new england powder. Apparently we're in for a soft season in the northeast so you'll be good with the sin 7 or some of those wider skis...Farmers Almanac is never wrong haha.
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