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What Are The Mechanics Of Boot Control ? - Page 2

post #31 of 35

I like this one.   Tip the feet.  The keep it simple approach.  

 

 

post #32 of 35

I have long been confused about the notion of starting the turn from your feet while simultaneously locking them into a fixed position in your stiff ski boot. Intuitively,  it does not seem possible. For myself, I have discovered the  best way to reconcile what I READ about boot mechanics and what I DO to make my skis turn is to learn how to use ,"The Phantom move".

 

Harald Harb popularized this move with his PMTS system but many other excellent instructors have cited it. Even this forum references the concept    http://www.epicski.com/t/22393/phantom-move-phantom-edging

 

To perform the phantom move, find an easy smooth groomed intermediate slope. Start skiing downhill making parallel turns. Once in a rhythm, focus on the end of your turn where you step onto the uphill ski to release the downhill ski. Now, consciously tip that OLD down hill ski (now the inside ski of the new turn) onto its little toe edge (face the sole towards the outside ski) and NOTICE how the new outside ski follows suit and automatically tips on edge and your hips move to the center of the turn. Most experienced skiers make this move subconsciously. Performing this move ACTIVELY will deconstruct your turn and aid in understanding  the mechanics of a ski turn and the role that the BOOT plays in making a turn.

 

After performing this exercise a few times you will realize that your feet do not tip the ski on edge directly. Instead, tipping your inside foot onto its little toe edge  moves your hips (and thus your center of gravity) to the inside of the turn. This translation of your hips tips your skis onto their edge and your momentum bends the ski into an arc causing you to turn. Your boot's real job is to make sure that when you tip your feet, your hips while follow.

 

Try this silly little exercise and see if you don't agree.

post #33 of 35

If I were to dig up my old 210 straight skis out of the crawl space, and use them once ski season begins, could they serve as a good indicator of whether or not I'm using the tip and turn method that's been mentioned a few times? 

 

I'm thinking that the lack of sidecut would make the technique much more obvious when it is and also ISN'T being used.

post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post
 

If I were to dig up my old 210 straight skis out of the crawl space, and use them once ski season begins, could they serve as a good indicator of whether or not I'm using the tip and turn method that's been mentioned a few times? 

 

I'm thinking that the lack of sidecut would make the technique much more obvious when it is and also ISN'T being used.


I'm thinking the opposite way.  More sidecut enhances the effect of tipping the skis.  What happens is that as the ski is tipped on edge and weighted on a hard surface the ski is bent into a curve as you push down the middle to touch the surface, while the ends are already touching.

 

BTW, it's tip to turn, not tip and turn.

post #35 of 35

Ghost, one can tip and turn when steering instead of carving.

Some people choose to steer their turns in order to go slower than a carve.

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