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Moving To Colorado Where is the Best Place To Live? - Page 4

post #91 of 98

Are places like Carbondale and Basalt where all the working class people live if they work in Aspen? 

post #92 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

Are places like Carbondale and Basalt where all the working class people live if they work in Aspen? 

 

It is a lot more complex than that.  The year round population of Aspen tends to be "working class."  The city doesn't have a whole lot of people whose net worth is in the 1-10 million range- what most people would consider rich, because that isn't really enough to buy a real house in Aspen while it is more than enough to buy a very nice house in many other primo areas of ski country.  The super rich folks who erect giant homes that get occupied 2 weeks of the year crowd all these guys out.  As a result, a lot of the people that are actually live there, instead of visiting over Christmas, are a lot more down to earth than one would typically expect.

 

There are several avenues to "affordable" housing. If you work for the ski area, you typically have access to dorm-style housing where you get an 8x8 room and share a bathroom and kitchen with several others.  Most quickly tire of this, and if they stay in town, get on the waiting list for some of the leased affordable housing, which ranges from Studios for the bargain price of $1200 a month to 1-2 bedroom places.

 

Moving up from there, you get on the waiting list to purchase a deed restricted house with capped appreciation.  These still tend to be very small, but it is also kind of nice to own a house that will basically never ever depreciate, as the true market value is a few million dollars above what you paid.

 

However, if you want things like a large yard or more floor space, your choice is usually to go without or move down valley until you can get a larger house in your price range.

 

Basalt still tends to be very expensive.  This is where all the "lower upper class" folks that got crowded out of Aspen but still want to ski there tend to congregate.

 

Carbondale is significantly cheaper, but definitely not cheap. A lot of the homes are of far lesser quality than Basalt and Glenwood Springs on the other side.

 

And Glenwood is where you get to having pretty nice houses available for $300k.

post #93 of 98

I've "Street Viewed" Glennwood Springs quite a bit. I like it from what I can see of it.  If you live there do you ski Sunlight or trek to Snowmass / Aspen?  I'm guessing that if one was retired you would make the trek whereas someone getting off work might be constrained for time and head for Sunlight?

post #94 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

I've "Street Viewed" Glennwood Springs quite a bit. I like it from what I can see of it.  If you live there do you ski Sunlight or trek to Snowmass / Aspen?  I'm guessing that if one was retired you would make the trek whereas someone getting off work might be constrained for time and head for Sunlight?

 

Well, it is a short hour from Glenwood to Aspen. It is also an hour to Vail and BC.

 

It really depends on what people want to do.

 

Sunlight is a great area- better terrain than any of the other local areas (Monarch, Powderhorn, Cooper, etc.) in the state.  It skis very well and definitely feels bigger than it is. 

 

I saw pretty much every combo. Lots bought Sunlight and Classic Passes to Aspen. Some bought Epic passes, or some combination of Epic Local and Sunlight or Epic Local and Classic. A lot just went full bore and bought full Aspen season passes.

 

Sunlight mentioned before that they actually sell more season passes in outlying towns like Rifle than Glenwood proper, as the extra driving time makes Sunlight more attractive.

 

You are really right in the thick of skiing there, only you are on the uncrowded side of things instead of the crowded side.

 

I can't say enough good things about the town.

post #95 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

It is a lot more complex than that.  The year round population of Aspen tends to be "working class."  The city doesn't have a whole lot of people whose net worth is in the 1-10 million range- what most people would consider rich, because that isn't really enough to buy a real house in Aspen while it is more than enough to buy a very nice house in many other primo areas of ski country.  The super rich folks who erect giant homes that get occupied 2 weeks of the year crowd all these guys out.  As a result, a lot of the people that are actually live there, instead of visiting over Christmas, are a lot more down to earth than one would typically expect.

 

There are several avenues to "affordable" housing. If you work for the ski area, you typically have access to dorm-style housing where you get an 8x8 room and share a bathroom and kitchen with several others.  Most quickly tire of this, and if they stay in town, get on the waiting list for some of the leased affordable housing, which ranges from Studios for the bargain price of $1200 a month to 1-2 bedroom places.

 

Moving up from there, you get on the waiting list to purchase a deed restricted house with capped appreciation.  These still tend to be very small, but it is also kind of nice to own a house that will basically never ever depreciate, as the true market value is a few million dollars above what you paid.

 

However, if you want things like a large yard or more floor space, your choice is usually to go without or move down valley until you can get a larger house in your price range.

 

Basalt still tends to be very expensive.  This is where all the "lower upper class" folks that got crowded out of Aspen but still want to ski there tend to congregate.

 

Carbondale is significantly cheaper, but definitely not cheap. A lot of the homes are of far lesser quality than Basalt and Glenwood Springs on the other side.

 

And Glenwood is where you get to having pretty nice houses available for $300k.

Funny because of the three ... I loved Glenwood Springs when I visited in summer.  It would probably be my choice because of the year round recreation.  That and the fact that everyone I met was super nice.

post #96 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skye Dayne View Post
 

Looking for good day and night skiing.

Looking for driving accessibility to other hills

Looking for a fun community that hosts events all year long

Im single, no pets ,own a business, easy going, love to ski

Reasonable living: Im coming from Millionaire Miami and would like a rest on the old pocket book for shared accommodations

Snow Kiting, biking, hiking, running, etc etc

 

I appreciate all the info you can share with me :)

There is only one spot for night skiing in colorado. Keystone.

post #97 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by billtro11 View Post
 

There is only one spot for night skiing in colorado. Keystone.

 

Very Wrong.

 

Steamboat offers night skiing: http://www.steamboat.com/tickets-and-passes/night-skiing.aspx

Granby Ranch offers night skiing: http://www.granbyranch.com/granby-ranch-mobile-home/ski-and-mountain-conditions.html

Hesperus offers night skiing: http://www.ski-hesperus.com/

And also in Durango, Chapman Hill http://www.durangogov.org/index.aspx?NID=544

 

I am SURE there are additional night skiing locations in the state.

 

Keystone has been doing it for a long time and is the best known for the practice, but there are plenty others.

post #98 of 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

Steamboat offers night skiing: http://www.steamboat.com/tickets-and-passes/night-skiing.aspx

 

How is the night skiing there?

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