or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mogul Ski Setup

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Looking for feedback on a bump ski setup. 

 

I've been a one-quiver skier for years, and am slowly adding to my inventory.

 

I'd like to know the difference between the F-17 Classic and World Cup. Although I'm not a pro bump skier nor have any intentions of trying to become one, I do enjoy spending the day in Mary Jane when I visit Winter Park. I don't have an issue with one ski being more mogul specific than the other, but I'm not sure if the WC's would be overkill if I'm not a professional.

 

I'd also like to know which bindings have worked for people, and if they noticed a major difference with offsetting their bindings from center, and if so, how much they were offset.

 

I'm 6' 0", and currently have Lange XT 130 boots, with Rossi Soul 7's (188) and Salomon Guns that I use for all-mountain/rock skis (Somewhere in the 170's, forget the exact length)

 

I know Hart's have a reputation for bump ski's but I am open to other brands. I've tried to find places that demo them, but they are a tough ski to find. 

post #2 of 11

Bindings FKS or Look Pivots are the consensus for mogul bindings because of the short mount distance and low swing weight. There are two different versions. the 12/14's but the 18's are stronger with an all metal single pivot toe.

 

The F17 Classic has more shape than the WC. The Classic is a modern GS shaped ski and for a technical bumper whop carves their turns. The WC is a straighter sidecut with a narrower tip. I am not sure what you are referring to as binding offset, lateral or are you referring to the fore/aft mounting? If it is the latter, that distance is measured from the tail and it varies with each size ski. The Classic would be a better option for what you are thinking. 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Fore/Aft. I would imagine a lateral offset would create a learning curve that takes a while to overcome.

post #4 of 11

2nd on the look pivot/rossi FKS, but more because of elastic travel than swiing weight.

 

I haven't had a dedicated bump ski for years, and have gotten by just fine with the past few incarnations of the solly 1080. A buddy is selling me his skied 3 times Fatypus B-Nastys for $200, so it looks like I'm going to have a dedicated bump ski again.

 

The B-Nasty is a little wider than either of the Harts, and has some early-rise in the tip. Of course I'm buying them blind, but have a few other pair of Fatypus' that I love, and think the shape and ER will work out well for western bumps. 

 

We shall see.

post #5 of 11

The 2015 Blizzard Latigo will be a great bump ski with an all mountain bias. A shockingly good ski. 

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

The 2015 Blizzard Latigo will be a great bump ski with an all mountain bias. A shockingly good ski. 

Just curious--Blizzard is an Austrian company. Do they use the same wild west names on skis they sell in Europe? Maybe the names are a bigger hit over there than here. I know my Wells Fargo credit card with a picture of a stage coach gets a lot of attention in Europe. And Karl May,one of Germany's most popular writers--perhaps the most popular-- wrote westerns. We now return you to the original question.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Just curious--Blizzard is an Austrian company. Do they use the same wild west names on skis they sell in Europe? Maybe the names are a bigger hit over there than here. I know my Wells Fargo credit card with a picture of a stage coach gets a lot of attention in Europe. And Karl May,one of Germany's most popular writers--perhaps the most popular-- wrote westerns. We now return you to the original question.

 

yes.  You can look at german ski shops online that sell blizzard skis, the names are the same.

 

At flachauwinkl in austria which is the park/pipe freeride/freeski "youth" oriented resort in austria 

the themes of ski/snowboard "gnar" and american western (cowboys/cowgirls/rodeo) are intermixed.  (literally down the road from the Atomic factory btw)

 

Weird? it threw me for a loop when i saw it; but not as weird as this though: http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2014/03/young-thai-men-emulate-mexican-cholos.html


Edited by raytseng - 8/24/14 at 12:19am
post #8 of 11
Second the Latigo, go Blizzard Buschwacker if you want to go slightly wider and without metal to flex more in the bumps. Also the Icelantic Pilgrim SKNY at 75mm Ive had fun on that one at Killington. Nordica used to make the El Paco if you can find one of those that would be one heck of a bump ski with twin tails you can throw around into the next bump.
post #9 of 11

I also haven't had a dedicated bump ski since my last F-17's about 1998.   A narrower 80-90mm all mountain ski is just so much more versatile.   The trees are the other half of the fun at the Jane, and wouldn't be nearly as fun on a mid 60's width ski like the F-17.   

 

I really think it's key to demo before buying any ski, but especially a bump ski.  Everybody skis bumps very differently (fast, slow, zipper, round turns, etc), and even similar skiers will likely have different preferences in stiffness, length, etc.

 

A couple fairly affordable ways to demo:  1) the jane ski shop has a pretty decent selection and it's only about $30/day with a pass discount, and you can switch skis all day.  2) Breeze sells a demo pass for about $225 to demo all you want all season.   Neither will have all the skis you might consider, but there is a good chance you'll find a ski you love, or at least be a much more informed buyer of some other skis.

post #10 of 11

If you're still determined to get a pure bump ski, IDOneski makes several models, and you should still be able to find the venerable Dynastar Twister for about the same price as an F-17 classic.

 

The F17 and Twisters are pretty darn narrow at 64 and 66mm respectively. The IDOneskis come in a variety of builds, but all with a 61mm waist. The Fatypus B-Nasty is one of the widest bump-specific skis at 72mm waist, and I think the only one with any early rise. It only comes in 175cm, so if you think you need something longer and narrower, look elsewhere.

 

To me, at least on paper, the B-Nasty should offer a nice compromise between mogul specific edge to edge quickness, and all-mountain versatility. Of course it's not going to be as versatile as a twin tip or all-mountain ski might be, but should be very good for its intended use. The B-Nasty was designed for, and with input from former World Cupper David Babic. The owner of Fatypus, Jared Maslish is a former Pro Tour bumper. That should give some indication of this ski's heritage and intended audience. I've seen Jared Shred on the B-Nastys in some pretty unforgiving bumps on Nix Nox at the Luv, and while he's a fairly large mammal, (over 6 foot), he didn't appear to be over skiing or over-powering the 175cm length. I don't think Babic is as tall, and this is a narrow target audience indeed, which might explain the single, intermediate length. At 5'-7", I think the 175cm will be just about perfect for me.

 

I'm still a little torn about the wisdom of this purchase. I doubt the ski will be very versatile, but am hoping that it will be better enough for a specific application, and ok enough for a few others (more snow, trees, groomers) that I won't regret the purchase. To be honest, I don't really care how it performs on groomers. I don't ski to ski groomers. I didn't move to Colorado to ski groomers, but sometimes they're unavoidable, sort of like how people sometimes think of moguls.

post #11 of 11

Couple more honorable mentions.. if you can find a pair in decent shape..

 

Moment Mowgli

 

K2 Cabrawler.  I have a pair of these.. Thumbs Up

 

K2 244  -these should be pretty easy to get a hold of. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion