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Need new Skis - confused on widths

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

I am need of a new pair of skis (boots also, but I can figure that out I believe) and am confused on which width I should go with.

 

A little about me:

 

        6'1" 185lb male.  Advanced Intermediate to Advanced skier.  48 years old.

 

I enjoy skiing groomers, some moguls and powder when it is fresh.  My current skis are probably 75mm or so wide 181cm long.  I am scared of getting something too narrow for powder but also too wide for moguls / groomers.

 

 

Time spent on terrain: Groomers 60%, Moguls 20%, Powder 20%.  (On fresh Powder days probably Powder 50%, Moguls 30%, groomers 20%)

 

 

Many reviews I read are pointing me towards 98mm (like the Bonafide) but I am concerned it might be too wide for my use?

 

Help!

 

 

Thanks,

 

Jonathan

post #2 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
 

I am need of a new pair of skis (boots also, but I can figure that out I believe) and am confused on which width I should go with.

 

A little about me:

 

        6'1" 185lb male.  Advanced Intermediate to Advanced skier.  48 years old.

 

I enjoy skiing groomers, some moguls and powder when it is fresh.  My current skis are probably 75mm or so wide 181cm long.  I am scared of getting something too narrow for powder but also too wide for moguls / groomers.

 

 

Time spent on terrain: Groomers 60%, Moguls 20%, Powder 20%.  (On fresh Powder days probably Powder 50%, Moguls 30%, groomers 20%)

 

 

Many reviews I read are pointing me towards 98mm (like the Bonafide) but I am concerned it might be too wide for my use?

 

Help!

 

 

Thanks,

 

Jonathan

If you search through the threads you will find that now a days a 90-100mm ski is typically used for a single quiver all mountain ski. The Bonafide would be an excellent ski for what you are seeking.

 

There is nothing wrong with going smaller if you really feel a need to but skis in that range will perform very well for what you want.

post #3 of 29

Don't get too hung up on the width.  There is much more about how the ski performs based on a combination of materials, construction, and dimensions. 

For the conditions you're describing, you don't need to be scared to get something like the Bonafide, but you may want to go a bit narrower, depending on the build of the ski.   This is based on your comments about the terrain you ski. 

 

Quote:
Time spent on terrain: Groomers 60%, Moguls 20%, Powder 20%.  (On fresh Powder days probably Powder 50%, Moguls 30%, groomers 20%)

 

You may like the Brahma a little better than the Bonafide based on this... ^^^

post #4 of 29

I'd stay with the 80 range myself, maybe even low 80's. groomer and bumps are going to be more fun with the narrower width and that is where you, and actually most of us, spend most of the time. My favorite would be the rossi experience 88 or even the 84, more carvie, less mass to move around in the bumps, faster edge change. the 88 especially is a one ski quiver in it's own, floats powder and carves like a rocket  :)

post #5 of 29

Welcome Jonathan. 

 

If you want more specific ski recommendations (beyond just width), many here are happy to help. 

 

You gave some good info but there are some missing key ingredients.  This part of the review template is helpful:

 

Ski Days/Season:

Years Skiing:

Aggressiveness: (select one, delete the rest): Conservative / Moderate(Finesse) / Aggressive(Driver) / Competitor

Current skis:

Home Area:

Preferred Terrain (select one/all, delete the rest): race course, groomers, terrain park, bumps, off-piste, trees

 

You may want to think about a few other nuances...  How fit and strong are you?  Are you a strong carver or do you mostly "skid around" and like a ski that is forgiving enough for that?  Do you usually make short turns and ski at slower speeds or are do you mostly haul ass and need a damp ski that needs speed to perform?  Would you consider owning two new skis or adding a powder day ski to the pair you own now or is a Jack-of-all-trades / one-ski quiver type of ski the only option?

post #6 of 29

Welcome to Epic.  nwjg nailed it with the information we really need to make any sort of informed recommendation.  What works for me as daily driver in Montana won't work nearly as well in someplace like Minnesota or for someone in Montana who only likes to putz around on the groomers.  How you ski and where you ski are all important in making recommendations.

post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies so far.  As nwjg requests here is more information:

 

I ski between 15-20 days per year and have been skiing off and on for 35 years.

 

Aggressiveness: I would like to say an aggressive skier, but probably 1/2 way between moderate and agressive

Current skis:K2 Axis (181cm?) ~10 years old

 

Home Area: I ski two main areas - Copper Mountain and Steamboat (of course both in Colorado)

 

I prefer groomers and fresh powder.  Bumps when I have powder.

 

I am pretty fit - work out an average of 3 times per week.

 

I am a carver - not sure if strong or not.  I skid around usually late in the day as I get a little tired.

 

I do a cross of making short slalom type turns and more of long sweeping (Super G type) turns.  

 

I prefer to get a jack-of-all-trades ski / one ski quiver.

 

 

Thanks again for the thoughts so far.

 

Jonathan

post #8 of 29

I can't really offer any advice on specific men's skis, but I can share my experience with fatter skis.  My current favorite ski is the Volkl Aura (2012) which has a 96 waist.  I ski it on everything - groomers, crud, some powder, small bumps (I don't like big bumps) and widely spaced glades.  It really can handle anything - even slick morning hardback and patches of ice.  I've never taken them on boilerplate because I would go home on those days.  A friend skis the Kiku (105 waist) and pretty much has the same experience. My point is ... don't fear the wider waisted skis, especially in Colorado where ice is a rare occurrence.  The combination of camber and early rise tip has really made these skis versatile!   if you particularly enjoy skiing glades and bumps, something with an 88 waist and a shorter turn radius would probably serve you better.  If there is a ton of powder, you can always rent for the day.

post #9 of 29

Bonafide would be an excellent ski. I'm about your size--I ski the 180. Fine on the groomers, fine in the pow, ok in the bumps. Given that you live in CO I think you'll find that with a ski like the Bonafide you'll be skiing off piste a lot more than you are now because you'll be enjoying it a lot more. And what a wider ski does for you is to expand the definition of powder to include stuff you might have called cement in the past (more of an issue here in CA.) Bonafide is also a good crud buster--and these days powder turns to crud in a hurry--because of skis like the Bonafide. And no matter what you get there will be days you'll wish you had bought something else, so don't lose sleep over it. 

post #10 of 29

The Bonafide is my daily driver.  I'll echo what oldgoat says.  It works in the bumps, but it requires a bit more work.  The other thing I'll suggest is that because it's such a versatile and forgiving ski, it lets you cheat.  So, it may not be ideal for improving one's form.

post #11 of 29

While it's the OP's wish to have a one ski quiver HE LIVES in COLORADO.  I think that's a mistake.  

 

Why not get a daily driver that's specificially designed for what he does 80% of the time ?  That would be bumps and groomers. Then grab a powder specific ski.  There are typically all sorts of sales on last years models somewhere if you look around and you can certainly find a deal on something to help with the significant expense of buying two pairs at once.  I think that's a better way to go.

 

Jonathan, with respect to your boots.  If you are anywhere near Denver or Summit County, CO and need a good bootfitter contact Jeff Bergeron at www.bootfixation.com  He'll get you on the right track offering what are a great match for your feet and your skiing style, and give you a superb fit. Tell him I sent you.

post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
 

While it's the OP's wish to have a one ski quiver HE LIVES in COLORADO.  I think that's a mistake.  

 

Why not get a daily driver that's specificially designed for what he does 80% of the time ?  That would be bumps and groomers. Then grab a powder specific ski.  There are typically all sorts of sales on last years models somewhere if you look around and you can certainly find a deal on something to help with the significant expense of buying two pairs at once.  I think that's a better way to go.

 

Jonathan, with respect to your boots.  If you are anywhere near Denver or Summit County, CO and need a good bootfitter contact Jeff Bergeron at www.bootfixation.com  He'll get you on the right track offering what are a great match for your feet and your skiing style, and give you a superb fit. Tell him I sent you.

 

I agree especially with the upcoming labor day sales OP could very likely find two pairs of skis for the cost of one especially if he's willing to buy old demos. Right now Christy Sports has all kinds of skis for around $400 on sale online and in store labor day sales will likely be even better. I personally like to hit up the Summit County sales but I'm sure there will be lots of good sales all over the state. 

post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post
 

 

I agree especially with the upcoming labor day sales OP could very likely find two pairs of skis for the cost of one especially if he's willing to buy old demos. Right now Christy Sports has all kinds of skis for around $400 on sale online and in store labor day sales will likely be even better. I personally like to hit up the Summit County sales but I'm sure there will be lots of good sales all over the state. 


another option is to hit the "blem" sale or just browse at starthaus.com   Worked w/Sierra Jim a number of years ago on an excellent deal on my Nordicas...price every bit as good as I have seen at Denver Labor Day sales.  Great customer service too!

post #14 of 29

I owned a pair of Bones and I don't really see them as an 80/20 ski.  For me, I'd want more of a full camber type of ski that is just wide enough for powder days but some skis with rocker carve pretty nicely.  Keeping in mind we are talking CO powder (6-12" and light), I'm thinking skis in the 70-90mm width range would be ideal.

 

Skies that pop into mind:

Kastle MX series (78-83 or 88)

Rossignol E88

Blizzard Brahma

etc...

post #15 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwjg View Post
 

I owned a pair of Bones and I don't really see them as an 80/20 ski.  For me, I'd want more of a full camber type of ski that is just wide enough for powder days but some skis with rocker carve pretty nicely.  Keeping in mind we are talking CO powder (6-12" and light), I'm thinking skis in the 70-90mm width range would be ideal.

 

Skies that pop into mind:

Kastle MX series (78-83 or 88)

Rossignol E88

Blizzard Brahma

etc...

I was thinking those 3 also.

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwjg View Post
 

I owned a pair of Bones and I don't really see them as an 80/20 ski.  For me, I'd want more of a full camber type of ski that is just wide enough for powder days but some skis with rocker carve pretty nicely.  Keeping in mind we are talking CO powder (6-12" and light), I'm thinking skis in the 70-90mm width range would be ideal.

 

Skies that pop into mind:

Kastle MX series (78-83 or 88)

Rossignol E88

Blizzard Brahma

etc...

MX88-He is between sizes there, the 178 will be too short, the 188 too big. Maybe the 186 FX94

E88-178, the longest length will be too short

Brahma- I think a better Bonafide for what he wants

 

Winner...

The SKi 185


Edited by Philpug - 8/23/14 at 11:05am
post #17 of 29

If you like to do bumps too, I would suggest that you stay under 90 mm width... But if you only ski bumps when it has just snowed, you can go for a wider ski in bumps and it wil not make a difference...

 

At 185 pounds, I think like Trekchick that you would like the Brahma; but you should maybe try also the bushwaker... ( same skis but with no metal)

 

You could also like the Kastle fx 84

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies.  My wife and I spent all day (ok - 5 hours) at the Christy Sports Powder Daze in Littleton.  Some good deals (but not great in my mind on skis.)  We both did end up with new boots, jackets and pants for the wife.  After dropping that coin, I definitely will end up with just one ski this year.

 

I did have the opportunity to talk to the Rossignol rep and Blizzard rep.  After discussing my skiing habits they both thought something in the 88mm range would be what I should go with.

 

This kind of breaks my thought process because I found a screaming deal on the Rossignol Experience 98.  Not so much of a screaming deal on Brahmas though.

 

One of the mfg reps (forgot which one) said that since my current skis are 70mm moving all the way to a 98 right away might have me struggling a little more as I get used to the new width.  Thoughts?

 

Thanks again,

 

Jonathan 

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
 

Thanks for all the replies.  My wife and I spent all day (ok - 5 hours) at the Christy Sports Powder Daze in Littleton.  Some good deals (but not great in my mind on skis.)  We both did end up with new boots, jackets and pants for the wife.  After dropping that coin, I definitely will end up with just one ski this year.

 

I did have the opportunity to talk to the Rossignol rep and Blizzard rep.  After discussing my skiing habits they both thought something in the 88mm range would be what I should go with.

 

This kind of breaks my thought process because I found a screaming deal on the Rossignol Experience 98.  Not so much of a screaming deal on Brahmas though.

 

One of the mfg reps (forgot which one) said that since my current skis are 70mm moving all the way to a 98 right away might have me struggling a little more as I get used to the new width.  Thoughts?

 

Thanks again,

 

Jonathan 

The E98 is not the ski you want, no matter what the "screaming deal" you think it is. Inexpensive ski can end up being vey expensive because you will either have a bad skiing experience or end up buying skis again, hence doubling the money you put out. Remember there are more wrong skis than there are bad skis, the E98 is the wrong ski for what you are looking for. 

post #20 of 29

Yeah, I'd definitely go right around 90mm with some tip rocker - something like the Volkl Kendo comes to mind.  I've never skied the Kendo, but I really liked the Mantra and the Kendo is constructed similarly, just narrower.

post #21 of 29

For the skiing you're doing you don't need wide skis. It's a big thing I know for people to advocate wide skis and claim they're just as good on piste. It reminds me of back in the 70s and 80s where everyone wanted the longest skis they could get their hands on and convinced themselves they were better for it. Learn to ski well and a ski of 85mm will take you almost anywhere. For those deep days which are not that common, hire a wide pair if you want to feel some real float but don't get them as your one ski. This is my opinion anyway.

 

Also there is some evidence that wide skis are not good for your knees when skied on piste due to the increased forces generated as compared with narrower skis.

 

I'm now braced for the fat ski mafia!

post #22 of 29

A few other ideas in the "90" range:

 

K2 Rev 90

K2 AMP Rictor 90 XTi

Line Supernatural 90

Head Rev 90

 

I've not skied any of these but the reviews I've read seem to point to the OP.

post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
 

Thanks for all the replies.  My wife and I spent all day (ok - 5 hours) at the Christy Sports Powder Daze in Littleton.  Some good deals (but not great in my mind on skis.)  We both did end up with new boots, jackets and pants for the wife.  After dropping that coin, I definitely will end up with just one ski this year.

 

I did have the opportunity to talk to the Rossignol rep and Blizzard rep.  After discussing my skiing habits they both thought something in the 88mm range would be what I should go with.

 

This kind of breaks my thought process because I found a screaming deal on the Rossignol Experience 98.  Not so much of a screaming deal on Brahmas though.

 

One of the mfg reps (forgot which one) said that since my current skis are 70mm moving all the way to a 98 right away might have me struggling a little more as I get used to the new width.  Thoughts?

 

Thanks again,

 

Jonathan 

What he meant was skiing the 98 after skiing a 70 mm wide ski will allow even you to see how much the 98 suck on hardpack, compared to a decent 70 mm ski.

 

If you know how to put a ski up on edge and bend it, then you are better off with a narrower ski for most of the skiing you do, and that narrow ski will be ok in deep snow (if you have skills and experience).  

 

If money is a concern, your best bet might be to buy used.

post #24 of 29

There are great deals on demos all over the place these days -- though it's getting later and later.

post #25 of 29

Sorry, forgot to make recommendation.  Kästle MX83, if you insist on one ski for the east and value deeper snow performance more than  race-like performance on hard pack.

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 

I have settled on the 88mm width.  Thanks for all the comments and suggestions. (Especially Philpug who gave me a little tough love...correct observation on that I should not go with a 98mm no matter how good the deal sounds.)

 

I like the reviews I am reading on the Brahma and the Bushwacker - just not sure if I need the "stronger" Brahma or not?

 

Thanks again.

 

Jonathan

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
 

I have settled on the 88mm width.  Thanks for all the comments and suggestions. (Especially Philpug who gave me a little tough love...correct observation on that I should not go with a 98mm no matter how good the deal sounds.)

 

I like the reviews I am reading on the Brahma and the Bushwacker - just not sure if I need the "stronger" Brahma or not?

 

Thanks again.

 

Jonathan

Not so much you shouldn't go with a 98MM, but the E98 is about the worst of the 98's..for what you want.  Brahma is a great 88 for what you are talking about but I still think The Ski in the 185, it is 93mm underfoot, is the best choice all. 

post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 

Just picked up 180cm Brahmas.

 

Thanks for the help.

 

Jonathan

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
 

Just picked up 180cm Brahmas.

 

Thanks for the help.

 

Jonathan

Congrats, not a bad call at all. 

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