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# of required days for a part time snow sports instructor - Page 2

post #31 of 45

Here's a little more salt for the wound:

 

Winter Park's Rocky Mountain Superpass, $529:

 

Unlimited Access: 
Winter Park Resort
Copper Mountain
Eldora Alpine Pass

Restricted Access:
Steamboat (6 days)
Crested Butte (3 Days)
Mt. Ruapehu (7 days)

(No Blackout Dates)

 

(And loads of benefits)

 

Aspen's and Alta's passes are more in line with Mount Sunapee's, though.

post #32 of 45

Winter Park is also a Real Deal resort.   Part-time & full-time employees (not temporaries) get free lift tickets to Aspen/Snowmass mountains, Telluride, Copper, Crested Butte, A-Basin, Steamboat, Loveland, Wolf Creek  (just about any non-Vail Resort).   Winter Park also has some free employee exchanges with Taos and a few ski areas in Wyoming.  You do have to pick up the vouchers at Human Resources and sign for them.

post #33 of 45
rolleyes.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by daysailer1 View Post

Winter Park is also a Real Deal resort.   Part-time & full-time employees (not temporaries) get free lift tickets to Aspen/Snowmass mountains, Telluride, Copper, Crested Butte, A-Basin, Steamboat, Loveland, Wolf Creek  (just about any non-Vail Resort).   Winter Park also has some free employee exchanges with Taos and a few ski areas in Wyoming.  You do have to pick up the vouchers at Human Resources and sign for them.

Well, that's asking a lot.

rolleyes.gif
post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
 

Jackson Hole has five different "Status" levels.  I'm sure I don't have all the details correct but this is close:

 

"A" is full time, minimum of 5 days a week, essentially 7 days a week during holidays. You get a full uniform, locker, season passes for the family, etc.  A higher base pay rate and you qualify for a bonus at the end of the season based on hours worked.  "A" is partly based on seniority.  Some level of health insurance.

 

"B" is full time.  Most of the same requirements and benefits as above, probably with a slightly lower base pay and a little less seniority.

 

"C" is pretty much full time.  Still (I believe) a family season pass.  A bit lower in base pay.  Less in seniority.

 

"D" is part-time.  Must be available Christmas through New Year's, President's week, and a week during spring break.  I think D's only get a season pass for themselves and maybe a discount on family passes.  Full uniform. No locker.  No insurance.

 

"E" is REALLY part time (that's me).  Only have to be available from Christmas Day through New Year's Day.  You end up with about the equivalent of ten days of "pass" tickets that you use on days when you're not working.  Lower base pay and, for the most part less seniority (although a few of us have 10 or 20 years of seniority).  Full uniform.  No locker.  No insurance.

 

The mountain sports school actually loves having D and E status instructors because of the enormous waves of lesson-buyers during Christmas, President's, and Spring Break.

 

Bob is almost right...  I think I might have it from memory, but could be wrong without checking.

 

A status has a commitment level of 525 hrs/season.  You get an 8% bonus at the end of the season if you make your hours.  You get priority booking over B, C, D, and E status instructors.  You get season passes for you and your entire family.  You get a locker, boot dryer, and a ski slot that holds 3 pairs of skis.  You must be PSIA L3 or higher.

 

B status has a commitment level of 400 hrs/season.  You get a 6% bonus at the end of the season if you make your hours.  You get priority booking over C, D, and E status instructors.  You get season passes for you and your entire family.  You get a locker, boot dryer, and a ski slot that holds 3 pairs of skis.  You must be PSIA L2 or higher.

 

C status has a commitment level of 300 hrs/season.  You get a 4% bonus at the end of the season if you make your hours.  You get priority booking over D & E status instructors.  You get a season pass for yourself and one other family member.  You get a locker, boot dryer, and a ski slot that holds three pairs of skis.  You probably have to share the locker, ski slot, and boot dryer with another C level instructor.

 

D status gets you a season pass for yourself.

 

E status gets you a 10 day pass.

 

I can't remember what the commitment level is for D & E status.  It is pretty low.  All status levels require you to work everyday during the rush periods.  None of the levels have a "set" number of days that you work a week.  Most A status guys have to work 5 or more to make their hours.  The good news is that if you are A status you work every day you show up.  

 

I am B status.  I was scheduled an average 5 days/week and worked almost every day I showed up.  There were three periods during the season that I worked 21 days in a row or better.  I fell just short of 600 hours last season with about half of them being request private.  I keep 2 pairs of alpine skis and a pair of teles in my ski slot.  Because I work in all three disciplines, I also share a snowboard slot with another snowboard instructor.  I keep all three pairs of boots and a prepped BC pack in my locker at all times.  

 

The way the bonus works is that you get a percentage of your earnings as a bonus if you make your hours, you get no bonus at all if you don't.  JHMR gave every employee a few percentage points (4?) as an unexpected bonus this season in addition to our existing bonuses this year!  Thank You very much!  

 

Every employee gets a 40% discount on food and a 20%? discount on gear.  Every employee gets a uniform.  Everyone has access to reciprocal passes at Grand Targhee with a supervisors letter.  Both resorts must be open to take advantage of this.  All employees get a Promotive.com access code.  We get free admission to Classical music performances at the Grand Teton Music Festival.  There are a bunch of other benefits that I can't remember right now.   I don't remember the gear discount, because I have a better deal than most as part of my ambassador position with JH Sports. 

 

A status and supervisors get an extra soft-shell piece that the rest of us don't.  Health insurance is provided for full time year round or dual season employees, not for any winter employees.  A & B status instructors can get a health insurance reimbursement with proof of insurance after 3 years of employment at B status or above.  I think mine was $160/month.

 

Base pay has nothing at all to do with status level.  Your base pay is determined by certification level, years of experience teaching at JHMR and other resorts. Your previous years performance in hours taught, training, group lesson students taught, and private request hours.  You also get credit for certifications from organizations other than PSIA, for example Avy certification, AMGA, and others.  I would make the same base rate if I was to move up to A status or down to C, D, or E status

post #35 of 45

At Seven Springs in PA where I teach we have to commit to at least 20 teaching days per season.  Those days need to include the majority of the Christmas through New Years busy period, as well as Presidents Weekend.

 

Benefits include a private locker room with ski and boot storage, season pass, three cheap season passes for family (includes extended family) and discounted day tickets and rentals for family and friends.  A variety of other discounts at the resort are also included (cheap rooms, reduced prices for off snow activities).

 

Mike

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeC View Post
 

At Seven Springs in PA where I teach we have to commit to at least 20 teaching days per season.  Those days need to include the majority of the Christmas through New Years busy period, as well as Presidents Weekend.

 

Benefits include a private locker room with ski and boot storage, season pass, three cheap season passes for family (includes extended family) and discounted day tickets and rentals for family and friends.  A variety of other discounts at the resort are also included (cheap rooms, reduced prices for off snow activities).

 

Mike

How many hours in a "teaching day"?  Meaning what is the minimum number of hours you have to be on mountain and available for lineups on a given day?

 

I know instructors at Massanutten who teach one weekday a week or a couple weekdays during the night session after working a day job.  Plus of course as many hours during the holidays as the SSD can get from them.  I'm thinking of people who live less than an hour away.  There are also a few experienced part-timers who are driving 3+ hours to teach on weekends, so they have to have a place to stay overnight.

 

Massanutten is building a new building to be completed for the 2014-15 season.  That will give the instructors a nice large room with storage for gear.  There's been a room in the lodge, but they outgrew it quite a while ago.

post #37 of 45

This thread is very timely for me. I've been considering starting as a ski instructor this coming season, but am having a hard time coming to terms with the required commitment. I've discovered that the commitment requirement can actually vary within a resort.

 

Wildcat is asking 28 days, while Attitash asks a few less than that. The two mountains are 20 minutes apart and operated as a single resort on the same lift ticket and passes. The benefits are the same: pass for you the first year, 2nd pass the following year, 50% off food, locker in the ski school building.

 

In contrast, Black Mt in NH does not have any minimum requirement. I don't know if I can foresee myself committing 28 days at one mountain, especially when we are talking about a mountain that can be brutally cold and very prone to wind holds.

post #38 of 45

@bliz1978, where do you usually ski?   Are you based in North Conway (or Mt. Washington)?   Ski club member?

 

Knowing how much of the day you want to spend teaching is an important part of picking where you want to work.  Also it's good to know who you want to teach and how much training you want to get when you go shopping for that job.  Some mountains get lots of walk-up lessons and will keep you busier than others.  Cranmore will keep you very busy.  Wildcat, not so much.  Attitash, not so much unless you are teaching in the kids' program, in which case you'll stay very busy.  I don't know about Black.  Bretton Woods will keep you VERY busy whether you teach kids or adults.  

 

Are you willing to teach little kids all day long and do lunch with them?  This will net you the most consistent hours and $$ earned, but it's still paltry pay.  Often teaching kids gets in the way of doing training with the staff, but you may not care about that.  At some mountains it can be a burn-out job.  Ask around.

 

Or do you want to stand at line-up and teach adults who show up, maybe mostly groups of never-evers who can't find their feet?  Those are my favorite people to teach, by the way.  If the mountain has lots of Level IIs and IIIs, they will get the intermediates/advanced lessons and you as the rookie may get only the beginners at first.  This option involves less consistent work at some mountains, thus more free time to go ski, and it also offers more ability to participate in the training sessions.  Ask when you go to the hiring fair about who has the time to go to the training sessions, kids' program teachers or adult line-up instructors, and how often these sessions occur.  Also ask who does the training, on-mountain staff or folks they pay and bring in once a month.  This will be especially important if you are interested in doing training to build your skiing skills, attain Level II or III PSIA certification, so you can teach intermediate or higher adults at some point.

 

If you are a strong backcountry skier who knows gear and tactics, or someone who got race training as a junior, or something along those lines that puts you in the expert category, you may be seen as a strong asset rather than just a warm body that hopefully will show up.  If you can't make the required commitment you may be able to bargain with the SSD.  Just sayin'.  Bargaining is best done behind closed doors before the hiring fair, not in front of the hopefuls at a big table in a crowded room.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 9/4/14 at 11:18am
post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

@bliz1978, where do you usually ski?   Are you based in North Conway?   Ski club member?

 

Knowing how much of the day you want to spend teaching is an important part of picking where you want to work.  Also it's good to know who you want to teach, and how much training you want to get, when you go shopping for that job.  Some mountains get lots of walk-up lessons and will keep you busier than others.  Cranmore will keep you very busy.  Wildcat, not so much.  Attitash, not so much unless you are teaching in the kids' program, in which case you'll stay very busy.  I don't know about Black.  Bretton Woods will keep you VERY busy whether you teach kids or adults.  

 

Are you willing to teach little kids all day long and do lunch with them?  This will net you the most consistent hours and $$ earned, but it's still paltry pay.  Often teaching kids gets in the way of doing training with the staff, but you may not care about that. 

 

Or do you want to stand at line-up and teach adults who show up, maybe mostly groups of never-evers who can't find their feet (my favorite people to teach, by the way)?  If the mountain has lots of Level IIs and IIIs, they will get the intermediates/advanced lessons and you will get the beginners.  This option involves less consistent work at some mountains, thus more free time to go ski, and it also offers more ability to go on the training sessions.  Ask when you go to the hiring fair about who has the time to go to the training sessions, kids' program teachers or adult line-up.  This will be especially important if you are interested in doing training to build your skiing skills and one day teaching intermediate or higher adults.

I am an active member of one of the EICSL ski clubs in North Conway. I am based out of there on the weekends, and live in Chelmsford, MA.

 

Last year I skied a total of 68 days. I usually try for Wildcat if possible, knowing that weather will dictate that it's a bad idea about 50% of the time due to poor snow, brutal cold, or wind holds. Those days I'll go to Cranmore, Attitash, or Bretton Woods. If I have to stay home for the weekend, I'll go to Crotched. Last year's counts:

Attitash - 9
Bretton Woods -  10
Black - 1
Burke - 1
Cannon - 4
Cranmore - 6
Crotched - 9
Jay Peak - 5
Sunday River - 3
Wachusett - 2
Wildcat - 19

 

Your advice is helpful. I am interested in teaching largely to 1) dial-in my skiing and take my skill to the next level and 2) reduce the cost of skiing for me and my better half. For that reason I'd like to teach less and train more, at least initially. I don't mind teaching kids, but don't want to play babysitter over lunch. Ideally I'd like to teach the beginner adults. The actual hourly pay is nearly irrelevant to me since I know it will be peanuts no matter where I go.

 

I know a few instructors at Wildcat, one at Attitash, and one adaptive instructor at Bretton Woods that I could contact.

post #40 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

So it's considered a "benefit" that you get a uniform? Isn't that just something you need for your job? The computer on my desk in my office isn't a "benefit". Its a tool I need for my work. Isn't an instructor uniform the same thing? 

A good many ski areas require that instructors purchase the "uniform", which frequently is just a jacket. I bought a lot of coats the first 33 years of my instructor career. Areas that provide a uniform ask that you turn it in at the end of the season. The current Vail uniform is almost a punishment.

To the OP, Vail resorts currently allow experienced part timers (even though the experience was elsewhere) to pick as few as seven days. We need lots of extra folks at extra busy times.
post #41 of 45

Berkshire East in Charlemont, MA is a good option for you if you want to get a lot of skiing in, not too many lessons - and have some excellent other instructors to ski with.

post #42 of 45

SMJ, this skier is a mountain meteorologist.  I'm betting he's based at the Mt. Washington Observatory.  He belongs to a ski club in North Conway.   Attitash, Wildcat, Cranmore, Black, and maybe Bretton Woods are the mountains within a decent drive of his club.  

post #43 of 45
Y'all need to form some kind of EpicSki instructor pod that floats around New England like a group of rare Right Whales. Areas should welcome you for one or two days a year because of the ticket sales you will attract from people like me.
post #44 of 45

I know I'd be up for that too.

post #45 of 45
Count me in.
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