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~100 under foot advice: Sick Day, Armada, Solomon

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi folks,

First time poster -- new member. Terrific site with really impressive knowledge base. I've combed and searched but wanted a bit more specific advice...

 

I own a four year old pair of Line Prophet 100s at 172 long but am looking to upgrade to some newer technology. I purchased the Rossi Super 7s last season at 180 long and just love them! Terrific for those rare POW days up here in the Pacific NW or when I'm at Big White in Kelowna, BC enjoying the actual real thing(!) -- they work so well on the softer, heaveir snow as well as in the obvious steeper and deeper yet still carve incredibly well when laid over. The Rossi's cover ~70% of what I need... what I'd like to find is not necessarily a carver, but a 95-100 under foot that will hammer up the groomers and steep slopes.

 

I'm 45, 5'-10" at an athletic 195 lbs.

Pacific NW mountains

Groomers, steeps, and POW (limited bumps and glades).

60% front side, 30% side country, 10% backcountry -- somewhere in there.

Level: strong 7-8 -- always looking to improve my ability without ending up in traction. :)

 

I've been looking at the Line Sick Day 95s, Armada TSTs, and the Solomon q98s. Anything else I should consider or drop from this narrow list???

 

Any input would be much apprecaited.

:beercheer:


Edited by TBuck - 8/19/14 at 4:59pm
post #2 of 22

First of all, welcome!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TBuck View Post
 

Terrific for those rare POW days up here in the Pacific NW

 

Second of all, we're clearly skiing in a different PNW from each other.  Rare powder days?

 

Finally, to your question, I'm not sure I get what your looking for to be honest.  You say you ski 60% frontside but your super 7's cover 70% of what you need, except apparently groomers and steeps.  Well, normally people use the term frontside to refer to groomers, so perhaps we have a difference in terminology here?  Second, you say you don't want a carver, but you say you want a ski that will "hammer up the groomers"?  Well, what do you want to do on them if you don't want to carve?  Also, if you love the way the super 7 carves when laid over, what is it you *don't* love about them that you're trying to find.  Finally, you state that you're looking for a more groomer oriented ski in the upper 90's, but all 3 of the skis you picked tend to be more focused on the soft snow side of things.  Sure you can ski them on groomers just fine, but I doubt anyone will try to claim that that's what they're best at.

 

So, my initial take is that your desires are a little scattered.  I get that you want a narrower ski to pair with your super 7's, which makes total sense.  I'm just not sure I understand what you want your narrow ski to be good at, at least not well enough to have any idea where to steer you.

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 

Apologies... hate wasting people's time and I think I may have done that in my previous post. After re-reading my question, you are right... it was a bit scattered. It's probably more terminology miscue -- on me.

 

I love my Rossi's... but I wouldn't say it's a one ski quiver -- at least not for me / my ability -- very close, however. You are correct, I want a narrower ski than the Super 7s... a set up that will allow a great day on the hard pack but still enable me to run off piste a bit with my kids or manage some fresh snow if the day presents itself... a predominantly (not exclusively) front side ski with some ability to take off piste during the day -- which is why I was in the 95-100 under foot range vs a more traditional, narrower carving width. Nothing too hooky or grabby... some forgiveness. Which, again, is how I ended up looking at the three mentioned in those widths.

 

Or, how about this... on a scale of 1-10 (1 groomers only and 10 POW only) --  I would say the the Super 7s cover 4-10. I'm looking for something on the other end -- knowing there will be a fair amount of overlap... looking for something to cover the 1-6 range... does that help any?

 

My comment about "rare powder days in Pacific NW"... as compared to the lighter stuff up in the Okanagan. But yes, they certainly exist up here -- in plenty -- but my point was it's a bit heavier, denser as compared to other parts of the country. IMHO.

 

I'm willing to drop in width to high 80s or low 90s... but always thought of widths in the 80s and below as true carvers(?).

 

I hope that helps some... it's sometimes tough to express into words what one is looking for when so much of this sport is both very technical and also very personal / feel related -- which has its own set of definitions!

 

Anyway... thanks again... I might just end up with some 2 x 4s, wing nuts, and some duct tape and call it good. :rotflmao: 

post #4 of 22

Don't demo a pair of 176 Kastle FX94's.

Not if you like 2x4's.

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
Oohhh... Aaahhh... THAT is a great suggestion. The Kastle... not my 2x4s. Thank you!
post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBuck View Post
 

it's sometimes tough to express into words what one is looking for when so much of this sport is both very technical and also very personal / feel related -- which has its own set of definitions!

 

I totally agree with you, I often find myself feeling the exact same way.  Part of the problem with looking for suggestions with stuff like this is your definition of a ski "that will allow a great day on the hard pack" is going to be very different from someone else's.

 

There are a whole lot of good skis to pick from in the 90's, that will (IMO) do great as the narrower ski in a 2 ski quiver for the PNW.  Which one, well, that's gonna come down to what kind of feel you like.

 

So you know where I'm coming from... I don't like overly stiff, demanding skis, and definitely prefer soft snow, bump and crud performance (yes I know that stiff, damp skis tend to make better crud skis, but this is all a set of compromises you need to work out).  I'm not terribly interested at all in pure hard pack carving performance, but that's me.  My daily driver is 98mm with a touch of tip and tail rocker.  My powder ski is 117mm with more rocker but still with some camber under foot.  That's what I like, which you need to know when listening to what I have to say.

 

All that said, I've skied 2 of the 3 on your list, the TST and the Q98.  The Q98 is a hoot in soft snow, bumps, trees, etc.  In crud, it definitely has a speed limit.  The TST is a little better in crud but not quite as mindless to flick around in softer conditions.  Both sound like they would do the trick for what you're looking for, but personally I like the Q98 better.  There are plenty of other good suggestion out there, depending on what kind of feel you like.  Damp and heavy and stable, light and playful and poppy, etc.

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Well said and terrific input. Much appreciated! I think we are actually on a very similar page... question: when you say that the, 'Q98s have a speed limit in the crud... can you elaborate a bit?

post #8 of 22

IMO, they don't quite have the stability to handle heavier or refrozen crud.  So if you're skiing that kind of snow, and you try to go too fast, the skis start to get knocked around in a disconcerting manner.  Enough that you feel like you need to slow down to maintain control of the skis.  Hence, speed limit.  A beefier ski with more stability will absorb more of the irregularities in the snow rather than transmitting them to you.  A ski like that can be skied faster in chunky, cruddy snow.

 

That said though, I did absolutely love the Q98 in soft snow and bumps.

post #9 of 22
Have you skied the Bonafides?
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBuck View Post
What I'd like to find is not necessarily a carver, but a 95-100 under foot that will hammer up the groomers and steep slopes.

I've been looking at the Line Sick Day 95s, Armada TSTs, and the Solomon q98s. Anything else I should consider or drop from this narrow list???

 

Any input would be much apprecaited.

:beercheer:

Can you find a pair of Movement Source or the new model is called the Chill out?  They are both 135-94-121.  Really a great all around ski that fits your needs.  I also have a pair of Elan Amphibio 88xti's that are 136-88-116 that don't float as well as the Movements, but are a much better ski to hammer the groomers and steeps.  They are a bunch of skis like the 2 I mentioned.  Just do your homework, buy and enjoy.  BTW, I have 192 TST's and they are really more of a soft snow biased ski, that are not in the same league as the Elan's or Movements.

   
   
   
post #11 of 22
Given your requirements, consider Volkl Mantras. Ok on ice, Ok in powder, awesome at everything in between. They do however require a strong pilot. At least The older models did but I'm not sure about the latest versions.
post #12 of 22

http://starthaus.com/2014-nordica-steadfast-ski-blem.html great, great price!

 

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/nordica-steadfast-alpine-skis~p~7053y/?filterString=s~steadfast%2F&colorFamily=01 also great price if paired with a good coupon say 45% or 50% (hard to come by)

 

Steadfast would be an excelent choice! Size 178 cm seems to be what you would be looking for! @mtcyclist will have good things to say about the steadfast!

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
All great ideas. Many thanks!
post #14 of 22
For $439 and at 195, you could get a pair of 184 Faction Prodigys: http://www.backcountryfreeskier.com/faction-prodigy-freeride-ski.html

Tip and tail rocker = ski shorter, quicker on groomers but give float in pow.
Stiffer mid-body = support your weight and hold an edge in groomers.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Factions... Didn't cross my mind. I've heard of them, just don't see them on the slopes too often -- I'll do some more homework. Thx!
post #16 of 22

I'd be looking at more of a hard snow ski to compliment a Super 7.

post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
Agree. Any suggestions? smile.gif
post #18 of 22
post #19 of 22
I'll go outside your box. Volkl Kendo. At least demo it, you may be surprised. From what your saying, I think you should try it.

I have the first year Kendo and still love it. Friends have gone to the upper 90's waist...but I have wider skis for the days when the snow is deep or heavy. The Kendo will still rip on a groomer. With a light binding the combo feels like feathers on your feet.
post #20 of 22
Not so much outside the box. A good recommendation actually. A skinny Mantra to compliment his wider soft skis
post #21 of 22
post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

All great stuff... I couldn't find anything on Epic regarding 4FRNT Gaucho... anyone taken these for a spin?

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