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Twin tip skis for Utah

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hello,

I just moved to Utah and am in the market for some new skis for this coming winter - I am especially interested in a twin tip that I can use as a one ski quiver until the day I have the funds for a larger arsenal - I am 5' 8" and ~145 lbs - I am not interested in a ski for the park and would mostly like the twin tips for powder. I will ski pretty much any blue run out here, and this year I want to move up to skiing more blacks, trees, bumps etc. Thank you!

post #2 of 8
What skis do you have right now? Are they in need of replacement or will you still use them? If you already have on-piste oriented skis I would recommend keeping those for the days when the conditions suck and getting some big pow skis for the good days.

Snowbird is my home ski area and my daily drivers are 117mm. I use them pretty much always, I only take out my narrower skis if it's been hot and no snow for a long time. That said, a lot of people prefer something a bit narrower for a daily driver. I tend to like wide skis.

If you really are looking for a ski primarily for powder and off-piste in general, I would recommend getting something about that size, just know that they will be far from ideal when the conditions suck. It also depends on how good of a skier you are. While big pow skis are not ideal for anyone when the conditions suck, expert skiers will have no problem making do with them, but beginners and intermediates will find them next to impossible to control on the worst days.

If you don't mind having less than ideal skis when the conditions suck, or if you already have a pair of narrower skis you can continue to use, I would recommend going around 115mm-120mm+ waist. Some models to consider are the Pettitor, Bent Chetler, Shiro, New Life, JJ, etc. If you want to spend a lot of time in the trees you'll probably want something with a relatively short turn radius such as the JJ, if you mostly want to ski more open areas and charge hard through pow and chop you'll want something more like the Pettitor or Bent Chetler.

That said, all of those skis (really pretty much any ski you'll find that's that wide and pow oriented) are designed for advanced and expert skiers. If you want something a bit more intermediate-oriented, and better on groomed runs and bad snow conditions, look more at skis in the low 100s (100mm-112mm). I am not as knowledgable in that area as I almost always ride fatter skis, so others could probably make better suggestions in this area, but some I would recommend looking into are the Atomic Vantage Ritual and Shreditor 102 or 112. While these skis will be easier to handle and better for variable conditions and groomers, they will not have as much float in pow as the wider skis I recommended and won't be as good for charging hard off-piste when the conditions are good.

Give us a little more info on you--whether you have on piste skis you can continue to use, whether or not on-piste performance matters to you, how much you'll be skiing trees and bumps versus more open areas, how agressively you ski, etc. Also, where did you ski in the past? When you said you ski pretty much any blue run, you mean in Utah or where you used to ski? It makes a big difference, I have skied double blacks that were easier than one of Snowbird's greens.
post #3 of 8

Hey

 

What kinda skis are you coming from? What have you been skiing in the past? I fill that I can think of that could work as an everyday ski for Utah

 

Blizzard Gunsmoke

Line SFB

ON3P Jeffrey (current year or next year 114)

2015 Line Supernatural 108

Praxis MVP (not realy a twin tip but good amount of tip and tail rocker)

Salomon Rocker2 108

 

You can go wider, but I wouldn't go narrower than 1-0-something underfoot as your only ski in Utah.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 

Guys this is great advice! Thank you so much - my old pair of skis are pretty much toast, so I will just have one pair. When I say blue runs, I have skied the big cottonwood resorts so I suppose something at snowbird would be a different story (though I hope I can get there this year! I really want to push myself) - I think I enjoy tighter runs in general rather than bowl skiing.  And yes, having something that can manage ok on-piste would be nice so I can do runs with my wife, who primarily stays on groomers.

post #5 of 8

Line SFB. 

 

 

 

 

 

Hands down.

 

 

 

 

 

Stop your search there.

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by byssinosis View Post

Guys this is great advice! Thank you so much - my old pair of skis are pretty much toast, so I will just have one pair. When I say blue runs, I have skied the big cottonwood resorts so I suppose something at snowbird would be a different story (though I hope I can get there this year! I really want to push myself) - I think I enjoy tighter runs in general rather than bowl skiing. And yes, having something that can manage ok on-piste would be nice so I can do runs with my wife, who primarily stays on groomers.
You might want to consider the Armada JJ, as it has a shorter turn radius which will help in trees and maybe on-piste, but I only skied them for a run or two and it's been a while, I don't remember them very well. They might be a little wider than you want, and more advanced/expert-oriented than you want. Given your last post, I would probably go around 110mm underfoot. You probably want around 170-175 length. Some people might tell you to go longer, but given that you still ski a lot of blues and are just getting to blacks, and also that you want to ski tight spaces (such as trees) a lot, I would advise against going too much longer, though it does partly depend on brand (K2 skis run longer, a "169" K2 ski is something like a "175cm" ski from other companies, so if you get K2 I would go around 169).

If off-piste is your focus, you could always consider getting a wider pair for off-piste, and getting a cheap beat up used pair for on-piste.
post #7 of 8
You should give the Rossi Soul 7 a look too.
post #8 of 8

I'm going to second the SFB suggestion. The ski is forgiving and very stable in soft snow (even miniscule amounts of it) and will make absolutely any turn shape through the tightest tree stands. If you like to hit kickers or launch off things, including moguls, this ski absolutely loves to be in the air. Very quick edge to edge in the bumps too btw.  I'd say the one thing you might need to get used to with this ski is the center mount position that requires a more neutral stance. You can drive the tips of the skis too, but really to get the most out of these skis you have to stay centered.

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