or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Avalanche Training - Page 2

post #31 of 45
It might have been me, but I didn't intend to turn it into an E v W discussion if it was.

Ski wherever you can. Have fun!
post #32 of 45

Ya ya, it’s all good. Smart of the OP to seek out backcountry wisdom early.

post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by COBillsFan View Post
 

Not really. It's a fracture, but it didn't move. Avalanches have to "flow" downhill rapidly.

Man, this thread is teetering on a E/W pissing match....

 

I don't think so, at least that wasn't my intent. Obviously the West has a lot more avalanche risk.

 

With the OP's clarifying posts, I understand that he isn't so much concerned with inbounds risk in the East (no documentation of any fatalities leads me to think that is not the most pressing concern), and I've stated on this board several times that I know there is some inbounds risk in the West.

 

I absolutely think it is worthwhile, West or East, for somebody leaving boundaries to take a class.

post #34 of 45
post #35 of 45

Read the books, get the equipment, take some classes, follow a guide. Just get out there. Anybody new with no experience needs to build some. So stay away from avalanche slopes, and get the shovel in the snow. Especially when risk is raised. Dig snow pits. Make some cuts. Trigger sluffs and small slabs. Like too small to bury a man. These things will build experience, and confidence. And as those things grow, you can start increasing your exposure. Patients and some luck and you'll have great life in the mountains. 

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post
 

Read the books, get the equipment, take some classes, follow a guide. Just get out there. Anybody new with no experience needs to build some. So stay away from avalanche slopes, and get the shovel in the snow. Especially when risk is raised. Dig snow pits. Make some cuts. Trigger sluffs and small slabs. Like too small to bury a man. These things will build experience, and confidence. And as those things grow, you can start increasing your exposure. Patients and some luck and you'll have great life in the mountains. 

 

Not too many patients, I hope.

post #37 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post
 

Read the books, get the equipment, take some classes, follow a guide. Just get out there. Anybody new with no experience needs to build some. So stay away from avalanche slopes, and get the shovel in the snow. Especially when risk is raised. Dig snow pits. Make some cuts. Trigger sluffs and small slabs. Like too small to bury a man. These things will build experience, and confidence. And as those things grow, you can start increasing your exposure. Patients and some bad luck and you'll have short life in the mountains. 

FIFY. There is no evidence that increased experience decreases risk. The number of very experienced skiers who have died in avalanches in recent years would suggest the opposite--surviving less dangerous conditions seems to give a false sense of security as risk increases.

post #38 of 45

That's how it works. As you gain experience and confidence you also gain exposure. 

post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

FIFY. There is no evidence that increased experience decreases risk. The number of very experienced skiers who have died in avalanches in recent years would suggest the opposite--surviving less dangerous conditions seems to give a false sense of security as risk increases.

It doesn't help when those surviving less dangerous conditions start seeking out more challenging lines, or ski the same lines in more dangerous conditions. 

 

I know at least a few experienced BC skiers who manage to keep their terrain choices fairly conservative, but even those more conservative lines carry risk, and the more frequently they're skied, the more the skier exposes themselves to risk. Anyway, the dragon doesn't care if you were being conservative or not. Risk can be mitigated to some extent, but never eliminated; something that everyone entering the BC needs to remember, whatever their level of experience.

 

As with many outdoor activities, the safest bet is to stay at home, but then you could still die or heart attack, stroke, boredom, or something else, so there's that... 

post #40 of 45

Take an avalanche course!!!!!  You will not regret it.  It won't necessarily save you from dying in a slide, but it may help to mitigate some of the risk of skiing out of bounds and it may help you to save someone else's life. 

 

A lot of people have a beacon, shovel, and probe and have absolutely no idea how to use them.  Take a course and learn how these tools can be used effectively.  And never blindly follow the "avalanche expert."  Trust me, all of the experts are dead. 

post #41 of 45

What are the differences between the Avalanche course levels?  Anyone care to explain? I definitely want to take a class, looks like fun and good info.

post #42 of 45
Rather than type it all out, read these from the Silverton Avalanche School:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/level-i-decision-making-in-avalanche-terrain-january-10-12-2013-tickets-8263882495
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/moved-to-march-20-23rd-hut-based-lev-2-tickets-8264135251

Level 1 - backcountry decision making. Level 2 - higher level science, analysis, and rescue.
post #43 of 45

Re L2, for any recreationalist potentially interested in pursuing avy education beyond L1, for the 2015-16 season (or perhaps, more realistically, the 2016-17 season), avy education beyond L1 will be split between a recreational vs pro track, very similar to Canada.

That means that a new post-L1 course will focus on skills of far more use to the recreational public, as opposed to the current L2 focus on snow science and formal observations (with the new post-L1 education for pros going way beyond the current L2 & L3).

post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Have there been any avalanches on the east coast??? Looking back thru the reports, the only ones that jump out are two in Quebec, and a few in New Hampshire. Only 3 skier-related, so I don't if anyone has courses there. There are books you can read.

One is: Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain

 

Thanks for the recommendation - about 1/2 way through - great book.

 

As a side effect, all I can see when I'm watching ski films now is a running refrain of "terrain trap, terrain trap, avalanche, avalanche, unstable, idiot, idiot, idiot"...

post #45 of 45

That is the level ski films have pushed things to.  Quite amazing there have not been more fatalities when filming

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion