or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Denver to Vail drive - Page 4

post #91 of 109

For what it is worth, I found the stock geolanders just fine in the snow on my 2010 Forester XT.

 

Ditto for the Uniroyal Tiger Paws that replaced them.

 

More often than not, Wolf Creek Pass is hardpack/ice from the base of the pass to the Summit. More often than not, there is a flatlander/rental/CMV stuck on the upgrade just past the overlook hairpin on the West side, from where they slowed down to negotiate the hairpin and lacked momentum to carry themselves up the steeper portion just past the turn.

 

"Just fine" also includes the performance of these tires living in our house at 7500 feet that normally gets 100-150" of snow a year.  Our driveway is 15' below the road, is quite steep, and the first winter in the house we did not have a snowblower.  Our method of clearing the driveway was charging the drifts with the family Subarus (2005 Forester is my wife's car). The AWD and no season tires would keep the car moving forward in snow deep enough where the front bumper was acting as a plow.

 

Are snow tires better? Yep.  But I wouldn't be "plowing" my driveway with a FWD car equipped with snows. AWD offers an enormous advantage as long as one drives with a brain (not exceeding the capability of your tires to stop the car/negotiate the turn).

post #92 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

I don't think anyone answered you yet; I don't really know "how widespread" anything is, but those things do exist. I have no clue how they affect traffic; Friday morning ski traffic is definitely greater than it used to be, but I don't know if it's lessened weekend traffic. I kind of doubt it.

 

I think this is one of these ideas that would be sensible, but because skiers are a minority population even in Denver, the only businesses that practice something like this are ones run by a skier (that cares about their employees enough to bother to give them a way to not be a weekend warrior instead of just ditching themselves.

 

The practice seems a lot more prevalent down in my neck of the woods than anything I ran into on the front range.

post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

I think this is one of these ideas that would be sensible, but because skiers are a minority population even in Denver, the only businesses that practice something like this are ones run by a skier (that cares about their employees enough to bother to give them a way to not be a weekend warrior instead of just ditching themselves.

 

The practice seems a lot more prevalent down in my neck of the woods than anything I ran into on the front range.

Well, I don't think that is entirely true. I believe it is becoming more common in many areas but not because of skiers ("it" being flexibility in work arrangements). My husband has been telecommuting for some years, 6 or 7? His ea lives in Ft Collins, and his associate splits time between Denver and Chicago. This is an international firm, not a CO-skier-run-business. In fact, because I can ski weekdays, many of the people I ski with are on flexible schedules, for one reason or the other. But not because their bosses are skiers. Mostly because their fields need to operate 7 days a week, so someone has to work weekends, and thus get weekdays off. 

post #94 of 109
I work virtually 100% of the time. My team is spread around the country. My upline management is in NJ.

That is the difference between 15 days a year and almost 40. Plenty of family days can be had on weekday teacher workdays, and it takes the pressure off of weekends.

Working skiers should be pursuing flexible work. It is the model of the future and getting good at it breeds success in many areas of life.
post #95 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

I think this is one of these ideas that would be sensible, but because skiers are a minority population even in Denver, the only businesses that practice something like this are ones run by a skier (that cares about their employees enough to bother to give them a way to not be a weekend warrior instead of just ditching themselves.

The practice seems a lot more prevalent down in my neck of the woods than anything I ran into on the front range.
I work in a 24/7 911 dispatch center. To keep things fair, everyone works one weekend day, and has two midweek days off.

I can't imagine a better schedule except maybe working both weekend days for three midweek days off.

Businesses that are open 7 days and skiers that work for them should be all over this.
post #96 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by UGASkiDawg View Post

There is next to no traffic on Friday nights or Monday mornings.....baring extreme weather or major accidents.  The I70 congestion is not like DC weekend traffic.  Almost all of the I 70 traffic in winter is based on people driving up in the morning to ski and returning home that afternoon.  Sat morning and Sunday evening are busier than Sat evening and Sunday morning but not by much.


 


Interesting. So, the vast majority of Denver area skiers/boarders are day tripping to Front Range ski areas on Saturdays or Sundays rather than going up Fri night and returning Sun afternnoon? Are all those condos around Frisco/Silverthorne/Dillon filled mostly with non-Denverites?

Regardless, something like compressed work schedule allowing for a regular day off every, or every other, Monday or Friday would allow for many to day trip to skiing on those days instead of Sat or Sun.
post #97 of 109
You have both. Lots of people stay over and plenty don't. I have four kids and two large dogs - cheap lodging does not come easy. I'd ultimately be better off buying a place, which I will do once my lodging money is not being eaten by teenage boys.
post #98 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 
 

 

  Are all those condos around Frisco/Silverthorne/Dillon filled mostly with non-Denverites?

 

 

I'm sure there is a significant number of 2nd home owners from Denver.  I know several in Aspen.  One guy has Sunday dinner in Aspen and says he rarely runs into heavy traffic driving back to Boulder.    Friday night traffic is a lot worse than it was in the 80's, but the key is still to just avoid the peak travel times.

post #99 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
 
Are all those condos around Frisco/Silverthorne/Dillon filled mostly with non-Denverites?
 

 

Short answer is yes. A fair bit are owned by people on the front range, but most of those are also in the rental pool.

 

Because of traffic, it seems more common for front range people to get into seasonal rentals with their friends and co-workers, but that seems to me to be a pretty recent phenomenon.

post #100 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

Interesting. So, the vast majority of Denver area skiers/boarders are day tripping to Front Range ski areas on Saturdays or Sundays rather than going up Fri night and returning Sun afternnoon? 

 

Yes, I'd agree the huge majority of folks are up and back in the same day.   While it's a pain in the butt, it's by far the cheapest way to ski.   I think most front range folks are also good with just skiing one day a weekend (or even a month), then maybe planning one or two long ski weekends per year to get away.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

Are all those condos around Frisco/Silverthorne/Dillon filled mostly with non-Denverites?
 
 

Well, they mostly are sitting empty!   Two thirds of the housing stock are second homes and utilization is only about 25%, even combining rental and owner use.  I'd guess about half are owned by Coloradans and half folks from out of state, but can't recall seeing firm stats on that.  

 

A couple articles I had bookmarked about second home ownership in the CO highcountry:

http://www.nwccog.org/docs/NWCCOG%202ndHome%20Study%20Binder_2004.pdf

http://www.vailhomeowners.com/NWCOG2ndhoastudy0404.pdf

 

About a third of my ski group has bought second homes.  It really helps get more days in, but with family life, activities, work, school, child care, etc, it's still really difficult for most folks to get up more than a couple times per month.   Putting the kiddos in a weekend race program is the best motivator I've seen to get up all the time... so that's my not so secret plan :D

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

Regardless, something like compressed work schedule allowing for a regular day off every, or every other, Monday or Friday would allow for many to day trip to skiing on those days instead of Sat or Sun.
 

I think Denver probably has one of the highest combinations of both flexible schedules and folks working from home.  Lots of folks like me and others here try to use that flexibility to hit powder days.  The volume of weekday traffic on a powder day is pretty remarkable, but fortunately not enough to overload the highway... yet.  What's also nice about working from home is you generally can work from your second home too!

 

One thing not mentioned yet is the benefit of cheap passes on spreading out traffic.  Before the cheap passes most folks would try to get their money's worth of a day ticket and wouldn't be willing to come late and/or leave early.  I think traffic would be much worse now if not for the flexibility allowed by cheap passes.

post #101 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

You have both. Lots of people stay over and plenty don't. I have four kids and two large dogs - cheap lodging does not come easy. I'd ultimately be better off buying a place, which I will do once my lodging money is not being eaten by teenage boys.

 

Not if your boys weekend activity is ski racing every weekend from Nov to April then it's a necessity;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

 

I'm sure there is a significant number of 2nd home owners from Denver.  I know several in Aspen.  One guy has Sunday dinner in Aspen and says he rarely runs into heavy traffic driving back to Boulder.    Friday night traffic is a lot worse than it was in the 80's, but the key is still to just avoid the peak travel times.

 

I'm a second home owner and know many others...a majority besides me and my kids ski team families are lucky to get up 5-8 weekends in a 6 month season.  Many of those condos sit empty the rest of the time and others are rented out.

 

We drive up on Friday night and drive home on Monday morning throughout Jan-Mar.  The rest of the season which for us starts early Nov and runs to mid April we drive up Friday night and come home after dinner on Sunday night.   A big storm can change those plans in an instant though and we can drive up Thursday night or come home Monday night.  Powder days are more important than school or work:D

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

 

Yes, I'd agree the huge majority of folks are up and back in the same day.   While it's a pain in the butt, it's by far the cheapest way to ski.   I think most front range folks are also good with just skiing one day a weekend (or even a month), then maybe planning one or two long ski weekends per year to get away.

 

Well, they mostly are sitting empty!   Two thirds of the housing stock are second homes and utilization is only about 25%, even combining rental and owner use.  I'd guess about half are owned by Coloradans and half folks from out of state, but can't recall seeing firm stats on that.  

 

A couple articles I had bookmarked about second home ownership in the CO highcountry:

http://www.nwccog.org/docs/NWCCOG%202ndHome%20Study%20Binder_2004.pdf

http://www.vailhomeowners.com/NWCOG2ndhoastudy0404.pdf

 

About a third of my ski group has bought second homes.  It really helps get more days in, but with family life, activities, work, school, child care, etc, it's still really difficult for most folks to get up more than a couple times per month.   Putting the kiddos in a weekend race program is the best motivator I've seen to get up all the time... so that's my not so secret plan :D

 

I think Denver probably has one of the highest combinations of both flexible schedules and folks working from home.  Lots of folks like me and others here try to use that flexibility to hit powder days.  The volume of weekday traffic on a powder day is pretty remarkable, but fortunately not enough to overload the highway... yet.  What's also nice about working from home is you generally can work from your second home too!

 

One thing not mentioned yet is the benefit of cheap passes on spreading out traffic.  Before the cheap passes most folks would try to get their money's worth of a day ticket and wouldn't be willing to come late and/or leave early.  I think traffic would be much worse now if not for the flexibility allowed by cheap passes.

 

 

box checked...... but be careful what you wish for as you may get it in spades............it costs a mint to ski race a couple of kids that are 11 and 9 jand ust gets exponentially more expensive as they get older and more competitive.  You also may spend some powder days working as volunteer at your kids race day scraping the glorious powder off the course so the knuckleheads can race:eek 

post #102 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

 

I have to disagree with you on the A/4wd.  I rarely ever need it on I-70 and it's typically much more expensive.

Kim may want to reserve both and then pickup the appropriate model,  based on current road conditions.


I agree. I drive Denver to Vail 5-6 times each winter and never rent an AWD vehicle.

 

The CDOT does an incredible job on keeping the roads clear during snowstorms .I have driven

a front wheel drive car with traction control many times during some whiteout conditions without

issue. You just need to drive cautiously.

 

Denver FWD weekly rental-180-280 bucks

Denver AWD or Suv- 800-1500 bucks!

 

Sometimes you can just rent a FWD car and negotiate with them at the counter. If there is a huge storm ,you may be able

to get an SUV with a small increase.

post #103 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

^^^It will happen when the state implements equipment checkpoints. It is beyond me how we have a 100% failure rate model on a route with no bypass that is deemed acceptable.

 

Then people would be bitching and whining that chain control causes them to be backed up when they're all virtuous with their AWD etc etc and should have a priority lane.  Plus I don't see lots of great chain up spots on I70 that could cope with lots of passenger vehicles.

 

Some simple things that could possibly done - mandate that rental car agencies at DIA supply chains rather than just trying to lamely upsell full size SUVs until they run out.  Fact is the price differential between a mid or full size and an SUV is huge. 

 

Meter big rigs at peak flows between Vail pass and Georgetown and mandate inside lane only on upgrades? Introduce chain lanes where the road isn't fully plowed and encourage 2wd to use them? 

post #104 of 109

The next time I-70 is closed Westbound from Georgetown on a powder day, I'm totally skinning the frontage road/bike path to Loveland!:bs:

 

Seriously though; touring Berthoud Pass is almost always an option for me if I-70 traffic sucks too bad. The biggest challenge is finding a last minute touring partner.

post #105 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post

The next time I-70 is closed Westbound from Georgetown on a powder day, I'm totally skinning the frontage road/bike path to Loveland!BSmeter.gif

Seriously though; touring Berthoud Pass is almost always an option for me if I-70 traffic sucks too bad. The biggest challenge is finding a last minute touring partner.

I've debated that as well. As the crow flies I live 7 miles from winter park. If US40 were closed I would seriously consider skinning over James peak.

Send me a PM if you're ever looking for a last minute touring partner.
post #106 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiNEwhere View Post


I've debated that as well. As the crow flies I live 7 miles from winter park. If US40 were closed I would seriously consider skinning over James peak.

Send me a PM if you're ever looking for a last minute touring partner.

Will do. I've done some mellow stuff in the James Peak area with a buddy of mine who just relocated down to Denver, so might be looking for a new or additional touring partner in this neck of the woods anyway.

 

Fair warning: I'm slow and pretty damn conservative.

post #107 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post

Will do. I've done some mellow stuff in the James Peak area with a buddy of mine who just relocated down to Denver, so might be looking for a new or additional touring partner in this neck of the woods anyway.

Fair warning: I'm slow and pretty damn conservative.

Got no problem with that. I prefer slow and conservative at first in the BC anyways
post #108 of 109

^Right on. I'll be in touch.

 

Loveland Pass gave up some pretty good turns for a short distance before the ski area even opened last year. Don't want to jinx us, but I think we might be in for a similar situation this year.

post #109 of 109
I skied the pass on May 11th of last season when we had that 2 foot storm. It was epic, and I don't use that word lightly. Hoping for some more days like that this season
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Resorts, Conditions & Travel