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Skis for Coloradan moving to Quebec - Page 2

post #31 of 52

Given your light weight and your preference for bumps, you might also enjoy the Kästle LX 72 (in a 154 length).

post #32 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

Cannot believe some of the recommendations. Icelantic? Samba? Worth?

 

The Worth was to tch (hence the quoting of his post and my use of the word 'you').    My thoughts to brford are on record, witness:

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

I read this and I thought Head iRally or similar for the carver + something comparable to a K2 Sight for an icy bump/ icy tree ski : cheap 'coz the tree roots will show, as damp as possible 'coz the rain turns to coral, and no metal 'coz bumps are all over.

 

And a warmer coat than for Colorado.   And some boot gloves.  :)

post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

 

Hey now. The Icelantic Pilgrim is 90, so not much more than the 88 in your range. The Pilgrim SKNY is 75, even less than your suggested range. And it would be a comfort taking some Colorado homegrown stoke with her, I get it. I still think it's a great idea. (I also think the 75 would be what I would buy)

 

 

Ditto this -- the SKNY is an appealing ski.  Edges underfoot, a carver, good in bumps.  And a lot cheaper than Kästles.  What's not to like?

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
 

 

So you mirrored my post above and then say we all have no clue? :nono:

 

He didn't say that. And I'm guessing he's not talking to you.

 

And, seg, that's interesting about the SKNY. I'll have to look at that sometime. It's so narrow they had to take some of the letters out? Is that it?

post #35 of 52

Broke you all out of the summer doldrums, huh? :D Letsee:

 

Seg, didn't know that Icelantic was making skis under 90. Devil's Advocate: not clear to me that any narrow ski is automatically good on ice. I can think of some real messes, made by major companies with lotsa experience in carving. Indies are newer at the project. Which entails more than just having edges or wood cores; resonance damping and torsional flex patterns, for instance, can be key. Finally, give that typical Montreal firm is not the same as Colorado firm, also far more common. So in the absence of any reviews - Lakespapa have you skied it? -  I'll withhold fireworks, but keep open mind. 

 

Rossi Smash, qcanoe is right, not talking to you, and didn't say that. Did say that racing skis are not a good choice for someone who seeks out bumps. I'll leave space here for your obligatory paen to how any skier worth his/her salt can and should use racing skis in icy small bumps: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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Cantunamunch, sorry, misread your syntax. And yep, from what I hear back here, Worths rock in trees, taking a hard look meself. 

post #36 of 52
Never have suggested SL or other "racing" skis were good in bumps. That's why they make bump skis.
post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Broke you all out of the summer doldrums, huh? biggrin.gif  Letsee:

So in the absence of any reviews - Lakespapa have you skied it?

Nope -- good point. Seg's suggestion followed the OP's question re: Icelantic, her local brand. Could very well suck, though the limited research I did made it sound promising. I suggested MX83s, which is what I'm skiing this season.
post #38 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post


Nope -- good point. Seg's suggestion followed the OP's question re: Icelantic, her local brand. Could very well suck, though the limited research I did made it sound promising. I suggested MX83s, which is what I'm skiing this season.

Don't see too many students on Kästles, though.

 

I have not skied the Pilgrims, so I can't say, but Icelantic does indicate that they were responding to not only CO's low snow years, but requests from Easterners as well. 

post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Don't see too many students on Kästles, though.

I have not skied the Pilgrims, so I can't say, but Icelantic does indicate that they were responding to not only CO's low snow years, but requests from Easterners as well. 

You're right, although the demos I bought were less than the SKNYs new.
post #40 of 52

I'd look at a 90mm all-rounder like the Nordica Helle's Belles. QC may be icy from time to time, but Montrealers don't ski there, they ski at Jay.

post #41 of 52

She's already got a nice pair of 94 mm soft snow skis (albeit a little worn).  She needs to expand, explore new territory and get some narrow high performance skis for 80% of the conditions she is going to see. 

post #42 of 52

^^^^^ +1,000

post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

I'd look at a 90mm all-rounder like the Nordica Helle's Belles. QC may be icy from time to time, but Montrealers don't ski there, they ski at Jay.

 

...but she won't be a Montrealer, she'll be a Coloradan in Montreal ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

She's already got a nice pair of 94 mm soft snow skis (albeit a little worn).  She needs to expand, explore new territory and get some narrow high performance skis for 80% of the conditions she is going to see. 

 

...and, further,  *no one* has recommended a >20m carver, in spite of knowing that the overwhelming majority of surfaces that are going to be unmogulled enough for carving will be groomed boulevards.    Interesting.

post #44 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Don't see too many students on Kästles, though.

 

I have not skied the Pilgrims, so I can't say, but Icelantic does indicate that they were responding to not only CO's low snow years, but requests from Easterners as well. 

 

I agree on the Kastles.  Probably would have recommended LX92 if she can find a good used pair or something on close out.   Icelantic has some good stuff with a ton of versatility.

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

She's already got a nice pair of 94 mm soft snow skis (albeit a little worn).  She needs to expand, explore new territory and get some narrow high performance skis for 80% of the conditions she is going to see. 

Her desire to replace her current 94mm waist ski because they're beat.  Since she got those skis a lot of the 94-98mm waisted skis have made vast improvements on versatility. 

If a one ski quiver is a must, I'd still go with the 90-98mm waist. 

 

A really great option would be the Helles Belles if she can find one in the right length since they won't be made going forward. 

Start Haus had a ton of them but they're sold out. 

http://starthaus.com/2014-nordica-hells-belles-ski-blem.html

post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by brford9 View Post

Hi! I have grown up absolutely love skiing in Colorado. I, however, am moving to Montreal this fall for school and am looking for a pair of skis that will suit the conditions in that area. I am an expert skier and female (though I don't necessarily need a woman's ski). Right now, I have a pair of 2007 Salomon Scarlets. I bought them new and have loved them so much that I haven't got a new pair since, but they've gotten a little worn out, and I am hoping to find a new pair that is better suited for the conditions. Thank!s in advance for your help!

It's the OP's repetition of "better suited for the conditions" that gives me pause re: a 90+ waist ski.
post #46 of 52
Originally Posted by Pacobillie View Post
 

If I may chime in.

 

I have been skiing in Quebec for the past 40 years, being born and having always lived here.  Conditions here vary quite a bit, especially around Montreal, because of occasional winter rain and thaw cycles.  On weekends, conditions tend to get somewhat icier, due to higher skier traffic.  However, that is mostly true of blue runs at busy resorts (such as Tremblant and Bromont) that see the most traffic on weekends.  On weekdays, conditions are generally very good.  

 

If you are going to use only one pair of skis, my recommendation is to stick with an all mountain ski in the 85-90 mm waist width range. I have been skiing on 88mm wide skis for the past 5 seasons and there is not one day that I can remember where I would have wished for something narrower.  As to the recommendation of 115 mm powder skis made above, forget about them.  We do get powder from time to time, but it usually gets skied out by 10 AM, unless its a weekday, a really good storm and the roads are really really bad, so that nobody can get to the goods.

 

A final word of wisdom:  avoid Tremblant on weekends!   It is way overcrowded, unless you ski mostly weekdays.  The most interesting ski area for an advanced skier within 75 minutes of Montreal is Mont Sutton.  The best deal for a weekday skier is Bromont ($119 weekdays only season pass).  

 

Welcome to Quebec!

 

@brford9,

 

Your skiing experience is going to be very different this upcoming winter from what you're used to.  Most or all of your days on snow are going to be on hard snow, what you call ice, and you may find that groomer skiing is all that's available for a good part of your season (I hope I'm wrong about that; perhaps @Pacobillie can provide more infor on the frequency and quality of tree skiing near you).  Your current twin tip skis have a 96mm waist.  They keep you very happy off piste in CO.   Should you catch a powder day in your new location, you can use your old skis.

 

But you need a daily driver that will keep you happy on hard-snow groomers, week-old compressed bumps, and often the same kind of bumps in trees.  Maybe answering the questions below will help people make specific suggestions.  Do pay attention to what Pacobillie says above, especially the red and blue.  

 

When you find yourself skiing in Colorado on a day when the groomers are icy, REALLY icy, and you have to spend some time skiing that hard snow....

--Do you like skiing your current skis down those groomers, and find this part of your skiing delightful?  Or do you just endure until you get to the lift?  

--Have you been staying home when there is only hard, icy snow out there?

--Do you stay home when there is only groomer skiing available?

--Do you have a racing background? 

 

 

 

post #47 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post


It's the OP's repetition of "better suited for the conditions" that gives me pause re: a 90+ waist ski.

This is an area where I think the ski industry has not kept up with demand.  

There are some amazing carving skis that hold up to an expert skier and incredible 90+ skis that hold up to an expert skier but the skis (for the most part) in the mid fat (think 80's) range are either build for a bull or for the consummate intermediate. 

The Helles Belles is a great example of that 90mm waisted ski that answers the question but with the #90 it got a bad rap and is no longer in the line up. If it were an 89mm waisted ski, it would have sold like hot cakes. 

 

Most folks walking into a ski shop get hung up on the #'s, which are only a tiny part of the performance factor. 

 

The 96mm waisted Salomon Lumen is a better, more versatile ski than the 94mm waisted Scarlett, because construction materials have changed.  

 

The ideal suggestion for the OP would be Salomon W24 for front side carving, and something wider for soft snow days. 

post #48 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

 

I agree on the Kastles.  Probably would have recommended LX92 if she can find a good used pair or something on close out.   Icelantic has some good stuff with a ton of versatility.

Her desire to replace her current 94mm waist ski because they're beat.  Since she got those skis a lot of the 94-98mm waisted skis have made vast improvements on versatility. 

If a one ski quiver is a must, I'd still go with the 90-98mm waist. 

 

A really great option would be the Helles Belles if she can find one in the right length since they won't be made going forward. 

Start Haus had a ton of them but they're sold out. 

http://starthaus.com/2014-nordica-hells-belles-ski-blem.html

 

The LX92 is a nice ski BUT not close to a hardsnow mainstay. A CO daily driver? Absolutely. Quebec? Na... she can do much better!

post #49 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

 

 

When you find yourself skiing in Colorado on a day when the groomers are icy, REALLY icy, and you have to spend some time skiing that hard snow....

--Do you like skiing your current skis down those groomers, and find this part of your skiing delightful?  Or do you just endure until you get to the lift?  

--Have you been staying home when there is only hard, icy snow out there?

--Do you stay home when there is only groomer skiing available?

--Do you have a racing background? 

 

 

 

 

Where is all this CO "icy snow" you speak of? I can barely think of the last time I skied that in central VT. The snow making/grooming give me great skiable snow every trip up, without almost any exception. Now Quebec is maybe slightly more known for it but still..

post #50 of 52

Having skied a fair bit in the East and also the West (Alta, Snowbird, Snowbasin, Brighton, Steamboat, Vail, Snowmass, Mt. Hood in a wide variety of conditions) I feel comfortable saying this: conditions on a mediocre groomer day in the west are about the same as a really good day in the East.  Yes, you can get terrible conditions and great conditions in both places, but the East is just that more groomed, packed, frozen....whatever.  If you ski a lot in the East (and at a reasonable skill level), you get very comfortable edging hard snow, and don't see what's so special about it.  But if your frame of reference is the west....most folks will be really surprised.  If you plan on carving, you need the right tools.  

 

And....I will say this also.  Trekchick is right that construction, etc. trumps absolute reliance on numbers.  But as a guy who has owned both 75mm carvers and 95mm carve-oriented skis, narrower is almost always better than wider on overly-groomed hard snow back here.  Yes, wide skis can grip and carve.  But they take just that much more effort and angulation to get there, and that can get problematic. Even for designed carvers (I'm looking at you Firearrow84). If I were buying skis for skiing 85% of the East, I would look for the right ones, but I would not go over  80mm.  

post #51 of 52

It's like this: most days skiing in Quebec, skiing on a 94 mm wide ski would be like lapping this race track

 

http://www.fastridingschool.com/michelnfast.php

 

on a

2013-Harley-Davidson-Sportster-XL883NIron883c.jpg

Sure, you can do it, and it would be fun, but it would be a lot more fun with this

post #52 of 52
Which school are you going to?

There are a few Montreal locals on the forum, you might even bump into one. Personally I'm happy with my 67mm ski most of the time in local hills around Montreal, and on a good soft snow day my 85mm ski works fine as well. Forget about powder, you won't be able to do any storm chasing. But unless the weather really doesn't cooperate you probably won't deal with icy slope either since you'll go with a club.

Take it slow in bumps the first time, what we have here might be a little different from the bumps you are used to. And get a pocket sharpener to touch up the edge, slipping on ice is very hard on edge.
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