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Go Pro Video - Road Cyclist is Clipped by PickUp Truck

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 20

I'm sure the driver will be prosecuted to the full - wait.... what? Failure to stay in lane? That's it?

post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

I'm sure the driver will be prosecuted to the full - wait.... what? Failure to stay in lane? That's it?

:nono:No sh*t!  

 

Maybe drivers will pay attention when there is a law that makes it illegal to run bicycles down :dunno

post #4 of 20

You'd think they could at least call it hit and run. They would have if the cyclist had caused a dent in someone else's car.

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

This probably isn't going to come out right, but at least the driver of the truck stopped to assist the cyclist.  

 

Sounds silly to commend someone who does what he/she should do, but it seems that we usually hear about the hit and runs. 

post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

This probably isn't going to come out right, but at least the driver of the truck stopped to assist the cyclist.  

 

Sounds silly to commend someone who does what he/she should do, but it seems that we usually hear about the hit and runs. 

 

He did? Looked like a sedan that pulled over and helped. There sure were a lot of cars that couldn't be bothered.

post #7 of 20

Yeah -- I feel sorry for both of them, really.  The cyclist, obviously, but also the guy in the truck, who suffered a momentary lapse that turned ugly.  We've all done it, found ourselves slipping over the line.  Lucky the cyclist wasn't killed.

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post
 

Yeah -- I feel sorry for both of them, really.  The cyclist, obviously, but also the guy in the truck, who suffered a momentary lapse that turned ugly.  We've all done it, found ourselves slipping over the line.  Lucky the cyclist wasn't killed.

 

I'd like tio hope it was a momentary lapse. Sometimes it's for fun "let's give this asshole on the bike a scare!".

post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

 

I'd like tio hope it was a momentary lapse. Sometimes it's for fun "let's give this asshole on the bike a scare!".

 

 

I've seen videos of that.  I don't feel sorry for those guys.

post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

 

He did? Looked like a sedan that pulled over and helped. There sure were a lot of cars that couldn't be bothered.

From the news report 

Quote:
 BULLARD, TX (KLTV) -

A bicyclist was clipped by a vehicle while going over an overpass on Highway 69 in Bullard on Monday.

Bullard police say Mark Cathey, 57, of California, was riding on the northbound shoulder when a white Ford truck driven by 52-year-old Samuel Vercher, a Bullard resident, clipped Cathey. Vercher stopped and called 911. Cathey was taken to the hospital.

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

This probably isn't going to come out right, but at least the driver of the truck stopped to assist the cyclist.  

 

Sounds silly to commend someone who does what he/she should do, but it seems that we usually hear about the hit and runs. 

Yes, obviously an accident in this instance.  Sad for all involved.

 

If bicycles are going to share the road with motor vehicles, drivers need to be educated to their fragility before being licensed.

 

I have only ridden my roadbike twice this summer & am very selective of where & when.  There have just been too many of these instances in recent years.  I have also been victim to some of the behavior that epic cites.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

Phil and I only had our road bikes for one summer out here. Road riding scares the crap out of us.

 

 

On the other hand, there are some road cyclists who don't practice good road riding habits.  

 

The harshest reality is-

Drivers have too many distractions and wander a bit too much.  as @lakespapa said, we've all been guilty of it, whether its kids, food, radio or cell phone.  Operating the vehicle is responsibility #1. 

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

You'd think they could at least call it hit and run. They would have if the cyclist had caused a dent in someone else's car.
They could only call it hit and run if the person ran. He stopped and helped the guy. From the video it seems like a classic case of "you go where you look". The guy was driving down the highway and started looking over at the cyclist. Next thing he knew he was crossing over the line right at the bike.

Just because all they fined him for was failure to maintain doesn't mean he got off easy. There is always the civil side where that cyclist is bound to get a very nice cash payment.
post #14 of 20

If you think road riding in the US is bad you should try road riding here in Costa Rica. It's a combination of cycling being the second biggest sport so a lot of people are used to riders and generally give you room, combined with their less than sane driving habits of just passing and such whenever they feel like making it hairy at times. Always fun when a bus decides to buzz you (frequently). Nearly went over the back of an SUV Thursday when it stopped suddenly in the pouring rain and had no brake lights. 

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

You'd think they could at least call it hit and run. They would have if the cyclist had caused a dent in someone else's car.


Not a hit and run, but here he would be found guilty of  a "careless driving" charge for sure.  ($400 to $2000 dollar fine and/or up to 6 months in jail).  The cops would also charge him with "Dangerous driving causing bodily harm."  Whether or not that would stick depends on the guy's lawyer.

post #16 of 20

Whilst the truck was clearly over the line, the cyclist was also very close to it. It's always hard to tell from camera angles, but the cyclist appears to be in the nearest quarter of his lane to the traffic. I'm sure conditions closer to the hard shoulder are not as smooth and maybe even have debris, but he was still overly close to the line for safety in my opinion.

 

In busy/fast road conditions like that, I get as far away from the traffic as possible. Vehicles do drift and cause wind artifact. Being technically right doesn't matter when you get hurt, so use the whole lane and give you and them a little cushion. Glad to see he is still standing.

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrGolfAnalogy View Post
 

Whilst the truck was clearly over the line, the cyclist was also very close to it. It's always hard to tell from camera angles, but the cyclist appears to be in the nearest quarter of his lane to the traffic. I'm sure conditions closer to the hard shoulder are not as smooth and maybe even have debris, but he was still overly close to the line for safety in my opinion.

 

In busy/fast road conditions like that, I get as far away from the traffic as possible. Vehicles do drift and cause wind artifact. Being technically right doesn't matter when you get hurt, so use the whole lane and give you and them a little cushion. Glad to see he is still standing.

 

You're kidding? right! 

 

I understand self preservation & all but that is not even a bike lane as far as I can tell...   It is the shoulder.  Do you have any idea what kind of crud, junk & obstacles are on the shoulder of a road like that.  The biker has every right to ride IN the traffic lane, it is the responsibility of the driver to pass the bike as if he was passing a car, turn indicators, safe lane changes etc.

 

The fact that some of the posters on here think that is acceptable or normal to have momentary lapses while operating a motor vehicle is worrisome to me :nono: .

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 

The fact that some of the posters on here think that is acceptable or normal to have momentary lapses while operating a motor vehicle is worrisome to me :nono: .

 

Lapses aren't acceptable, as you say; if a persons screws up at the wrong time, he or she is liable -- but lapses happen, because we're human.  To deny that is unrealistic (modern highway design reflects realism of that sort -- when it catches up to the real).  

 

Moral responsibility demands that the driver prevent lapses, though.  So it ought to be a project of self-analysis (which is really what it takes) to make lapses as infrequent as possible.  That's hard to encourage with the blunt instrument of policy, other than to exact a financial or social cost.  

 

Driver education is too lax and abbreviated here, I think, but who's going to pay the costs of longer, more exacting training?  

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 

 

You're kidding? right! 

 

I understand self preservation & all but that is not even a bike lane as far as I can tell...   It is the shoulder.  Do you have any idea what kind of crud, junk & obstacles are on the shoulder of a road like that.  The biker has every right to ride IN the traffic lane, it is the responsibility of the driver to pass the bike as if he was passing a car, turn indicators, safe lane changes etc.

 

The fact that some of the posters on here think that is acceptable or normal to have momentary lapses while operating a motor vehicle is worrisome to me :nono: .

Not arguing that a biker has a right to be in a driving lane, but, if you bike,  always be aware, that in a collision with a moving vehicle, the biker looses. Said another way, never feel entitled on a roadbike. Cyclist loose focus of where we ride, just as the driver of a car. It's a two way street if you want to ride safely. On well traveled roads, I hog the right side of the paved path as best as possible. As a driver, I'm always amazed about the poor choices cyclist make. This weekend, I took my 7 year old grandson on a couple of miles ride. My sole focus was to teach him how to ride on the right side, and, always look ahead, especially when intersections are coming up. I would offer the observation that younger people who ride bikes never had the experiences that I had when I was there age and rode a bike almost everywhere. They are dangerous to themselves, and, to all in the roadway. Stay on the far right side, never ride side by side.

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post
 

 

You're kidding? right! 

 

I understand self preservation & all but that is not even a bike lane as far as I can tell...   It is the shoulder.  Do you have any idea what kind of crud, junk & obstacles are on the shoulder of a road like that.  The biker has every right to ride IN the traffic lane, it is the responsibility of the driver to pass the bike as if he was passing a car, turn indicators, safe lane changes etc.

 

The fact that some of the posters on here think that is acceptable or normal to have momentary lapses while operating a motor vehicle is worrisome to me :nono: .

 

Again, not really being able to tell from the video; but by choosing the left side of the hard shoulder, as opposed to the right side of the actual road, or the right side of the hard shoulder, he was increasing his risk, not decreasing it. Sorry to point all this out in light of his injury, but we live and learn. Maybe his contributing factor was riding on a road with no safe lane options for cyclists?

 

This discussion becomes incredibly complicated because there are no universal rules for bicycle use in the US. Each state had it's own set of regulations as to how and where you can ride. Four states have a mandatory shoulder use rules, whilst most states expect use of the roadway with restrictions as to lane use (far right) and to slow moving vehicles and impeding traffic. The majority of states treat cyclists as motor vehicles, unless you get off to push, then you are treated as a pedestrian.

 

Here is a link to the endless variations in law.

 

The basic constant is that the cyclist has the right to establish a lane of travel, with regard to other users of the road. The general rule is that the cyclist is to stay to the right of the lane. We have to remember that the hard shoulder is primarily there for emergency use and not for travel. It is in fact often a safety outlet for obstructions in your lane of travel. I don't think this was the case in the video, but the truck could have easily been forced onto the hard shoulder by oncoming traffic. 

 

Being right or wrong becomes moot once you are hit. My rule of riding is self preservation.

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