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Do ski instructors hate the way ski racerrs (and ex-ski racers) ski? - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Also I suspect they might give one answer if the skier was Herman Maier and another if it was Ingemar Stenamrk.

 

OK OK I know this dates me.

 

 

post #32 of 41

What does an instructor do when someone cuts a Reuel past the ski school class while he is explaining to his young charges why one shouldn't put too much weight on the inside ski?

post #33 of 41

Actually I can use racers to point out the good things they do through a series of turns to students. I stress that the "bad" things are not really bad just something that usually will not improve their skiing at this time. Good racers have great BERP skills, just they spend more time in and out of the circle so to speak.

 

Nothing wrong with skiing groomers a lot, good place to work on skills. If you  wish you can make a run down a green trail and still work yourself into a sweat and improve skills, sometimes better improvement there than on a black diamond run. All depends on how much you wish to work at it. Also remember it costs an instructor money (Auger Jar) if they crash so we always stay out of sight when having more fun, why you never see us.

 

I know that the student asking to go to the bump run really is not up to running the bumps. More often work on steep or bump or powder or ice skills on a more mellow terrain, then go over to the mild bumps as last lesson run. If a student really wants to go then fine, their dollar. If you are a good bump skier then fine I can give you some tips but they are mainly practice for you, not likely to see major difference, and this sometimes makes an un-happy customer although they brought it on themselves.

post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrison Claystone View Post
 

What does an instructor do when someone cuts a Reuel past the ski school class while he is explaining to his young charges why one shouldn't put too much weight on the inside ski?


I say that is a great exercise to teach them balance and improve their skiing, also mention that the ability to step over to the other ski sometimes could save them from a crash.

post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post
 

My highly opinionated $0.02 worth....

 

 

So tell me why do some instructors stop pushing themselves to get better?

 

Rick G

When teaching in my 20's kind of expected to have an injury or two every season caused by pushing the emvalope. In my 60's it has been dialed back a few notches, and have not had to wear plaster for a while.  Still ski steeps, wild snow and drill some every day on snow, just not with the same gusto. 

 

Rick, you will probably follow a similar pattern. Have you noticed that the younger racers are willing to push it a little harder than you yet? No, you will soon.

post #36 of 41

Racers race. Teachers teach. The rest of us ski, well or badly. Who cares what anyone thinks of anyone else?

post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

My highly opinionated $0.02 worth....

So tell me why do some instructors stop pushing themselves to get better?

Rick G

For the same reason anyone else stops pushing themselves or are pushing in a different direction. I started skiing late in life and still push myself technique wise because it's still new to me. I would rather spend my time training than just free skiing. I think some might think "Good enough!". Some just don't care and others just lack the desire as it isn't why they are here. I'm here to learn to ski better.

I work with instructors that have been skiing 30+ years and have come to realize, perfecting their technique is not why they are here. We have instructors that can't ski blacks well and still a bit defensively (my opinion). SAM absolutely loves them because the kids they teach love them. They are work horses, say yes to every class assignment and are willing to deal with the most unruly kids.

Their "pushing themselves", is learning more tricks of the trade on dealing with unruly kids. More than 50% of their time is on the beginners slope and they are happy. They never get a bump class.

Quite frankly, I don't know I would stay if I had to deal with what they take in stride. One or two "Operation Yellow Snow" or even worse, the dreaded "Code Brown" is asking too much of some people (i.e. me). They deal with it on a weekly basis.

We all have different goals.

JMO,

Ken
Edited by L&AirC - 7/20/14 at 3:30pm
post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post
 

When teaching in my 20's kind of expected to have an injury or two every season caused by pushing the emvalope. In my 60's it has been dialed back a few notches, and have not had to wear plaster for a while.  Still ski steeps, wild snow and drill some every day on snow, just not with the same gusto.

 

Rick, you will probably follow a similar pattern. Have you noticed that the younger racers are willing to push it a little harder than you yet? No, you will soon.

The good young racers crush me on the course.  I race in the old man's division but I can still hang with them just about everywhere else, and depending on who it is, will crush them in bumps or trees. Though I keep myself in pretty good shape, I know my days of pushing myself are slowly coming to an end.  But until that time manifests itself, I plan on skiing like an idiot as long as I can!

 

Rick G

post #39 of 41

Not sure about WC racers, but probably the most hate as mogul pro ski.

At least it's very different from PSIA demo.

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzolot View Post
 

Not sure about WC racers, but probably the most hate as mogul pro ski.

At least it's very different from PSIA demo.

 

Again, why would instructors hate how mogul skiers ski? As I said before, skiing is a functional activity. The function in a mogul skier's technique is to ski with a specific form that will score well, and do it very quickly. To that end, they're skiing very functionally. Is PSIA's preferred mogul technique different than the zipper line a pro uses? Darn skippy it is. Why? Because despite what many believe, skiing in a zipper is hard. Like, wicked hahd, as my Bostonian mother would say. Also, the zipper works best for a very specific purpose. Regularly shaped moguls with the line going straight down the fall line. The vast majority of moguls you'll happen upon in the real world are anything but regular or straight down the fall line. Even seeded bumps get oddities and irregularities in them as they grow and develop. So PSIA doesn't teach a zipper form, they teach a form that will be more functional for recreational skiers skiing in a real world environment. Doesn't mean instructors hate mogul skiers' zipper form. In fact, doesn't even mean that sometimes some of us PSIA instructors won't blast out a zipper line ourselves.

post #41 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

Again, why would instructors hate how mogul skiers ski? As I said before, skiing is a functional activity. The function in a mogul skier's technique is to ski with a specific form that will score well, and do it very quickly. To that end, they're skiing very functionally. Is PSIA's preferred mogul technique different than the zipper line a pro uses? Darn skippy it is. Why? Because despite what many believe, skiing in a zipper is hard. Like, wicked hahd, as my Bostonian mother would say. Also, the zipper works best for a very specific purpose. Regularly shaped moguls with the line going straight down the fall line. The vast majority of moguls you'll happen upon in the real world are anything but regular or straight down the fall line. Even seeded bumps get oddities and irregularities in them as they grow and develop. So PSIA doesn't teach a zipper form, they teach a form that will be more functional for recreational skiers skiing in a real world environment. Doesn't mean instructors hate mogul skiers' zipper form. In fact, doesn't even mean that sometimes some of us PSIA instructors won't blast out a zipper line ourselves.

Hate's a strong word, but "believe to be without merit for average recreational skiers" takes too long to type.

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