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Automotive earworm

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

A couple of weeks ago, instead of getting a song stuck in my head, a piece of automotive information that I haven't needed for 20 years just popped into my head and stayed there for about three days. Couldn't get rid of it.

 

18436572

 

Over and over and over.

post #2 of 10

Okay MC, what was it.

 

It is not nice to tease the old people. :hopmad:

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Firing order for a Chevy V-8. Most old mechanics know this. It's the young ones who haven't a clue, cuz cars don't have distributors any more.

post #4 of 10

It is the reason why it is best to change out your spark plug wires one at a time when performing a DIY tune up..  Perhaps we can hijack this thread to DIY Redneck Maintenance Tricks?

 

Couple of useful things to know..

 

You can often get ONE more start out of a fried starter by whacking it with a hammer to free it from the flywheel.

 

You can check to see if you alternator is charging by touching the belt wheel with a screwdriver while it is running. It creates a magnetic field when charging and the screwdriver will stick to the wheel when that is happening. 

post #5 of 10

It was cast right on the intake manifold!!  :D 

 

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrison Claystone View Post
 

A couple of weeks ago, instead of getting a song stuck in my head, a piece of automotive information that I haven't needed for 20 years just popped into my head and stayed there for about three days. Couldn't get rid of it.

 

18436572

 

Over and over and over.


Believe it or not, my Chevy Dealer got the firing order wrong on my 305 c.i.d. Chevy V-8.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

It is the reason why it is best to change out your spark plug wires one at a time when performing a DIY tune up..  

When the distributor remains in the engine, that works. When the distributor is out, it's a whole new ball game. Factory manifolds might have the firing order stamped on them, but if it's an aftermarket one, which it was for me, it might not be.

 

There are two ways to put a distributor into a Chevy small block - correctly, plus or minus a tooth, and 180° out, plus or minus a tooth. I was always lucky enough to get mine in straight, the first time.

 

I went to a Buick dealer once to ask for some advice on getting the distributor back into a Buick V-6 after replacing a timing gear. No one in the entire shop had a clue. They only knew how to work on computerized electronic ignition systems. I flew that one by the seat of my pants also, and got it in straight on the first try. 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Morrison Claystone View Post
 

There are two ways to put a distributor into a Chevy small block - correctly, plus or minus a tooth, and 180° out, plus or minus a tooth. I was always lucky enough to get mine in straight, the first time.

When I was 16 I had a 70 Impala with a 350 small block.  I had a friend that worked at auto parts stores at the time.  He changed the distributor cap for me.  He put it on and just cranked it back and forth until he found the sweet spot where the timing was good.  No timing light or anything, totally freehand.  I knew never to mess with that on my own hahaha.. But changing plugs and wires one by one is pretty safe and easy..

post #9 of 10

What do you do when you spend 2 years off and on rebuilding a 6 cylinder Corvair engine and when you finally get it in the car the distributor doesn't move when you crank the engine?

 

(why don't we have a Homer Simpson forehead slap smiley thing?)

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuller View Post
 

What do you do when you spend 2 years off and on rebuilding a 6 cylinder Corvair engine and when you finally get it in the car the distributor doesn't move when you crank the engine?

 

(why don't we have a Homer Simpson forehead slap smiley thing?)


Don't panic?  :-)  Pull it and make sure the gear is still attached to the shaft and the pin didn't break.  If the oil pump seized during the period of inactivity it may be able to break the gear off or, worse, snap the shaft.  Hopefully you can get that out again.  OR, it may simply not have dropped down into the oil pump slot.  Good luck!

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