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Do hardtails lead to bad habits? - Page 3

post #61 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post
 
 

The easiest way to keep it single is to rip out the roots or make the line the most favorable way.

 

 

 

Like most New Englanders, I live where there is nothing but roots as far as eye can see or bike can ride. Story about this. A few years ago we had one of the traveling trail building evangelist couples from IMBA come to town for a weekend in their emblazoned Subaru wagon. They were from Colorado, as I recall. Bunch of people showed up to help build a section of trail. (Disclaimer: I wasn't present that weekend, but worked on the same trail a couple of weeks later.) Their whole schtick was to remove ALL organic matter - notably including all roots - down to the mineral layer. This was very avant garde as far as our local folks were concerned. They were learning a lot about the way proper trails were built. Two days later, a VERY short section of trail had been completed, despite plenty of hands, backs, tools, and bug dope. Allegedly the IMBA couple stood up at the end of all this and confessed, "Yeah, I guess maybe we didn't really quite understand what we were getting into when we said 'remove all the roots'."

post #62 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

Like most New Englanders, I live where there is nothing but roots as far as eye can see or bike can ride. Story about this. A few years ago we had one of the traveling trail building evangelist couples from IMBA come to town for a weekend in their emblazoned Subaru wagon. They were from Colorado, as I recall. Bunch of people showed up to help build a section of trail. (Disclaimer: I wasn't present that weekend, but worked on the same trail a couple of weeks later.) Their whole schtick was to remove ALL organic matter - notably including all roots - down to the mineral layer. This was very avant garde as far as our local folks were concerned. They were learning a lot about the way proper trails were built. Two days later, a VERY short section of trail had been completed, despite plenty of hands, backs, tools, and bug dope. Allegedly the IMBA couple stood up at the end of all this and confessed, "Yeah, I guess maybe we didn't really quite understand what we were getting into when we said 'remove all the roots'."

 

 

I think you missed the second part of that sentence.

 

either rip out the roots which is what should be done if the trails was originally not rooty. Or make the roots the most favorable way. which means that you make the roots the most favroable way.

 

I hear a ton comments from both sides. "I love the smooth flowly trails and hate roots" or "smooth flowly trails lead to bad riders" . Quite honestly I like almost all trails. My biggest pet peaves are recently built trails that have really fast sections that go into to speed choking decreasing radius turns. Flow or no flow trail that may be my biggest pet peave of them all. I can ride this stuff faster than 99 percent of the local riders but its just never leaves me satisfied. 

 

One such trail is Kimmer's Trail. You have these long straight sections that lead into guide stone chocked decreasing radius turns that have caused the trail to get rutted right down the middle from people braking hard and skidding to get around "kinky" turns. 

 

http://www.strava.com/segments/772053?filter=overall 

post #63 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

Or make the roots the most favorable way. which means that you make the roots the most favroable way.

Insightful.

How do you make roots the most favorable way? I thought the tree did that?
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